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Discussion Starter #1
In July 2012, I bought a 2008 Burgman 400. Despite it having shim valves, which I hate. What a stupid system. My old Rabbit had shim valves, but they were at least shim-over-bucket.

I was wondering, what you owners think of the early model, such as:

Simpler valve adjustment (my first gen Concours had 16 valves, with screw and nut adjusters, I didn't mind working on it, even at 5,000 mile intervals :))
Do you think the 2-valve motor has adequate power
Is the single-sided rear swing arm a real advantage
Lower drive belt cost (mine was $164 on-line) :(

I like my 2008. And the engine just screams with its 4 valves. But I was just looking for opinions, especially from those of you who have experience with both models.

Really, I could have gone with the earlier model, it's just that I found this 2008. And it's red. :rolleyes:
 

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I love my K05, I have done one valve adjustment science I purchased it with 7,000 miles. I set them loose so I could barely hear them, that way I know when they need attention. 10,000 miles science the last adjustment with no problems. Just the stock exhaust inside welds rusting out and I upgraded it to a Leo Vince SBK muffler. Two thumbs up on the Pre-K07 Burgers!
:)
 

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In July 2012, I bought a 2008 Burgman 400. Despite it having shim valves, which I hate. What a stupid system. My old Rabbit had shim valves, but they were at least shim-over-bucket.

I was wondering, what you owners think of the early model, such as:

Simpler valve adjustment (my first gen Concours had 16 valves, with screw and nut adjusters, I didn't mind working on it, even at 5,000 mile intervals :))
I agree with you on the ease of adjusting the screw type adjusters.

Do you think the 2-valve motor has adequate power
In riding with other riders on 07+ 400s I don't have any problems keeping up with them in any real world situation. Stop light to stop light, going up an access ramp or riding the twisties I stay right with them. They might could beat me in top end but I've never raced anyone to as fast as they will go. When I road an 08 400 it did not feel any quicker than my 06 400.

Is the single-sided rear swing arm a real advantage
The advantage of a single-sided swing arm is reduced unsprung weight. Since the engine is carried on the swing arm of both bikes as unsprung weight that kind of becomes a mote point. The weight of the engine greatly exceeds the weight of a second swing arm. It is a little easier to remove the rear wheel with the single sided swing arm.
 

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I have ridden both the newer 2007+ models and the older 03-06 models, and can tell you I definitely prefer the older model due to its passenger backrest, ease of working with, cheaper price, and more storage space. The newer models almost have no storage at all in the left and right pocket stashes, whereas the older models can fit a pair of sunglasses. Really bad design when Suzuki made the newer models with less storage than the older ones and also took off the OEM included passenger backrests. The advantage with the newer models are there, but I still like the older ones better.
 

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I am really liking my new to me 2006 but I am moving up from a 50cc so it seems like a rocket to me. I also have not had it long enough to have worked on the valves. However I do agree that screw adjustment is far better than shims.
 

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Of the nine bikes on this year's Big Ass Scooter Ride The Rockies tour, one was an older 400 and was the one that was most challanged. Two later model 400's faired better. The older bike was being ridden by one of the co-leaders and, that bike frequently set the pace by necessity, whether in front or the rear. Still, it did great on the trip overall.
 

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The '03 to '06 400 is a 4V engine:



The '07+ engine does provide slightly higher output:

'03 to '06: 32.0 HP (7600 RPM) and 23.6 lb·ft (6000 RPM);

'07+: 34.0 HP (7300 RPM) and 26.8 lb·ft (5800 RPM);

The '07+ weighs 34 pounds (7.9%) more than the earlier models, and has taller (higher ratio) overall gearing both of which serve to negate any dramatic benefit from the power increase...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks! For some reason I thought it was a 2V. Great photo.
The view of the locknut valves makes me miss my 85 Toyota pick up truck (and 73 VW Bug)....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
From the Concours forum... "Slappy valves are happy valves" :)
 

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Isn't it also true that while the earlier models have easier to adjust valves, the later models don't often need adjusting?
 

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Isn't it also true that while the earlier models have easier to adjust valves, the later models don't often need adjusting?
That is true but the amount of work to adjust them when they do get out of spec more than makes up for having to adjust the earlier model ones more often. On top of that you still have to check if they are in adjustment periodically and that alone is just about as much work as actually adjusting the ones on the early 400.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
What a stupid design. Removing the camshaft to adjust valves. Really :hmph:
As was said before, screw and nut adjusters are a piece of cake AND it is entirely a DIY project.
Even if I adjust my shim valves at home, I STILL have to make a trip to the dealer, for shims.

Maybe I'll find a low mileage pre-2007. There's still room in the garage :)
 

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Having to remove the cams to change the shims is a common valve adjustment method on a lot of motorcycles. That is the way the valves on the 650 adjust. More work than the screw and nut adjusters but still a valid DIY project.

Your can buy a whole set of shims of different sizes on the after market for not a lot more than it would cost you to buy the individual shims for a single adjustment at the dealer. That is what I did and now when I do an adjustment I can just go to the box and pull the size I need for each valve.
 

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It's not a 650 shim set. It's just a generic set of 7.48 mm shims. A mechanic friend of mine ordered the set I have from his supplier along with a bunch of other stuff he was ordering. It is a Wiseco ASK7 kit. you can find them online. Here is a link to the same kit on Amazon. Amazon.com: Wiseco VSK7 Premium 7.48mm OD Valve Shim kit: Automotive

Lots of other people make and sell them though. Just Google 7.48 shims and you will find lots of links.
 
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