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Nope, too old for that, I'll leave that to the young folks. Looks cool, just not for me these days!
Thanks for the video! :thumbup:
 

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BASIC INFO ON HYDROPLANING.........

What is Hydroplaning?

The term hydroplaning is commonly used to refer to the skidding or sliding of a cars tires across a wet surface. Hydroplaning occurs when a tire encounters more water than it can scatter. Water pressure in the front of the wheel pushes water under the tire, and the tire is then separated from the road surface by a thin film of water and loses traction. The result is loss of steering, braking and power control.

Rubber tires have tread (grooves) that are designed to channel water from beneath the tire. This creates higher friction with the road surface and can help prevent or minimize instances of hydroplaning.

When does Hydroplaning Occur?

Hydroplaning can occur on any wet road surface, however, the first 10 minutes of a light rain can be the most dangerous.

When light rain mixes with oil residue on the road surface, it creates slippery conditions that can cause vehicles, especially those traveling speeds in excess of 35 mph, to hydroplane. This can be a deadly combination for the driver and surrounding motorists.

The chance of being involved in a motor vehicle accident increases during poor weather conditions such as fog, rain, ice and snow. However, it isn’t necessarily the pounding rain and blinding snow that are the most dangerous; it is the slick conditions that drivers aren’t prepared for.
 

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I'd say Hydroplaning is specifically about the volume of water/road-speed.

Rain after a dry spell is slippery because of a different mechanism. It creates a viscous layer by mixing water with dust/salt/tyre debris and oil that acts as a lubricant and breaks adhesion. It doesn't need the high speed or high volumes of water.
 

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Bluebottle said:
I'd say Hydroplaning is specifically about the volume of water/road-speed.

Rain after a dry spell is slippery because of a different mechanism. It creates a viscous layer by mixing water with dust/salt/tyre debris and oil that acts as a lubricant and breaks adhesion. It doesn't need the high speed or high volumes of water.
Isn't that what I just said........??????????????????????????????????????????????????
 

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I don't think we said the same, no.
But its only a technicality of Tribology, nothing to fall out about and a long time since it was on my timetable. The important thing is that rain after a dry spell is dangerously slippy and we both agree on that.
 

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Bluebottle said:
I don't think we said the same, no.
But its only a technicality of Tribology, nothing to fall out about and a long time since it was on my timetable. The important thing is that rain after a dry spell is dangerously slippy and we both agree on that.
YUP............You are 100% correct.......AND I have 10 stitches in my head (in the days before helmets!) to demonstrate that......!!!!!! :( :(
 

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Sorry to hear that.

I think the "rain after a dry spell" is more about dust than oil.
Oil doesn't need water to make it sloppy and tends to float away.

Dust, soil, sloughed tire dust, soot etc mix with water to form a paste or sludge that is just as slippy but harder to wash away.

I'm not saying there is no oil in there, just that dust is the main constituent.
It is strange to think of dust as dangerous but It can even be explosive if there is enough of it in the air - some early factories and mills blew up when dust in the air ignited
 

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Where I live in the desert I'm much more concerned about sand on the road. So would that be called sandplane of gravelplane. :roll: One thing I do know is slow way down on turns when you see it or else your down. :cry: I don't know of any street tire that has good traction in that stuff. Maybe some Burgman size knobbies would work. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
v8eyedoc said:
YUP............You are 100% correct.......AND I have 10 stitches in my head (in the days before helmets!) to demonstrate that......!!!!!! :( :(
You must be much older than I as helmet were invented way before I was born.
I have sewn my face up from when I was young an invincible and went helmetless as a choice.

BUT back the Hydroplaning here! (I miss Daboo for times like these)

There is definitely more water than road in that video and plenty of speed maintained do to the knobbies.
 

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Most of the time when dirt bikes do this they have those big knobbies or those paddle-type sand tires on the back. And it works fine to propel a bike across water.
 

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Scootereno said:
v8eyedoc said:
YUP............You are 100% correct.......AND I have 10 stitches in my head (in the days before helmets!) to demonstrate that......!!!!!! :( :(
You must be much older than I as helmet were invented way before I was born.
I have sewn my face up from when I was young an invincible and went helmetless as a choice.

BUT back the Hydroplaning here! (I miss Daboo for times like these)

There is definitely more water than road in that video and plenty of speed maintained do to the knobbies.
What I meant to say was it was way before there were helmet laws as there are now.....!!!!
 

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Maybe some Burgman size knobbies would work. :lol:
Nope - I ride a KLR 650 and the knobbies on the front skid very easily when there is sand on pavement.......scared the hell out of me on one concrete bridge, downhill, off camber going slow and just about lost it over the edge which has no rail.

VERY experienced dirt rider buddy did the same thing, same bridge a month later.....scared him too and he's a tough bugger.

•••

Early rain is on an oily surface is bad news but it's slippery - not hydroplaning.,,,different mechanisms. I've experienced the former, never the latter tho riding in the torrential downpours in Tropical Queensland I just might sometime.
Bike tires are narrow tho I supposed a flat dark side might be prone to it.
 
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