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Dang Skyway, great guess.
You forgot to mention that would be in Europe only, and that tickets would be raffled for the rights to buy one.
 

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Having never driven one of these or a Piaggio, what benefit does having three wheels on a leaning scooter confer? The only one that I can see is if you hit a patch of sketchy pavement under one of the front wheels, the other might take up the slack and keep you upright for a bit and prevent a spill. Besides that, am I missing something obvious here?
 

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In some 'other' countries...( not the US)
riders on 3 wheels do not need the same
drivers license that is needed on 2 wheels.
Some places they don't need any license at all.
 

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I could see that for a Can-Am or Polaris Spyder where the tri characteristic is rigid. On leaning three wheelers it would seem a specious distinction for that purpose.
 

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It looks to me like there are a lot of people living in the past. The only constant about life is change. Come on folks we are 15 years into the new millennium. Why do motor cycles still have 2 brake levers when ABS brakes have been the norm for almost 25 years. Why do people insist on a manual transmission with a clutch lever when on DCT bikes all you have to do is push a button. Old habits die hard.
 

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I see no reason for 3 wheels other than helping to keep the tire manufacturers in business. These scoots will not stand up on their own any better than my scooter with 2 wheels will. Just a gimmick, IMO. I watched a youtube video where a guy new to his 3 wheeled scooter came to a stop and didn't put his foot down fell right over. He looked absolutely shocked.
Lots more parts to maintain and break also. Not for me,,,,,,,,
 

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Having never driven one of these or a Piaggio, what benefit does having three wheels on a leaning scooter confer? The only one that I can see is if you hit a patch of sketchy pavement under one of the front wheels, the other might take up the slack and keep you upright for a bit and prevent a spill. Besides that, am I missing something obvious here?
I have ridden with a guy who has one. He has MS and his weakened legs cannot hold a bike up. The Piaggio's front suspension can be locked at low speed, allowing a full stop without having to place a foot down. It automatically unlocks after reaching a few mph.
 

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The local dealer has a used Piaggio MP3{with a batman logo on it!}. Anyway according to my uncle who is one of the sales guys the front suspension does lock at low or no speed and means you don't have to put a foot down at stops. He also said it makes turning at slow speeds idiot proof. However, at higher speeds it feels about the same as a regular bike according to my uncle.
 

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Personally, I want one! At age 73, I need every advantage!
 

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Mp3 400

Since my wife owns an MP3 400 and I've ridden it just a bit I can speak from some actual experience.

- Cornering stability is impressive.
I've seen some video of folks riding these in the snow in France, and also read an article that mentioned that one (with a better rider than I am) made it around an oil covered oval track.)

- That said I feel they are less flick-able than comparable bikes. The trike felt like it fell into the lean a bit slower, but that may just be my perception.

- Yup can you stop and not put your feet down.
There's a button that will let ya do that.
If ya get it wrong, it'll tip over.

- Storage on the older 250/400 is great, on the older 500 get a top box.
The newer 500 (not in N America last I heard) has good storage.

- They are kinda heavy for what they are as you'd expect. ~500lb's.

- Yes there is a special wide track variant for areas where three wheels with a specific minimum of separation means no need for a motorcycle license. England is one of those I believe. The "normal" one's a bit too narrow for that.
On a side note, you can indeed ride a CanAm Spyder on just your regular automobile license in California, USA.

- The newer ones that they keep waffling about releasing in the U.S. have larger front wheels than the older ones which are 12". I forget the spec off the top of my head. You can google it I'm sure. I think that'd improve the already surprisingly decent handling.

Overall, I could live with it, but not my cup of tea.
I recommend you try one before ya judge it. At worst it's kinda a neat change of pace for a ride or two.

If you're in the Seattle area and want to check one out, PM me and I'll check with the wife and see if she's OK with me showing off her toy.
 
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It looks to me like there are a lot of people living in the past. The only constant about life is change. Come on folks we are 15 years into the new millennium. Why do motor cycles still have 2 brake levers when ABS brakes have been the norm for almost 25 years. Why do people insist on a manual transmission with a clutch lever when on DCT bikes all you have to do is push a button. Old habits die hard.
I think not having full independent control of the front and rear brakes would lead to many riders "dying hard".
 

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I definitely understand the need for those who are physically challenged (or whatever this week's PC term for same is) to enjoy open air riding--however other than that I would be very surprised if Yamaha would sell more then 3 a year, if that, here in the Daytona area...
 

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From all I've read the Yamaha Tri-City 125 cannot be locked in the upright position. There is even a warning to place it on the side or setup stand when parked or it will fall over. I just see no point to a Tri-City 125 when my 125 scooter is a lot lighter, seat lower, way less complicated, only 2 tires to maintain and gets 84 mpg US. However I'd really like to ride one sometime!
 

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Same question... I find the current model under power I just hope that they would produce a larger displacement motor for it.
 

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I saw a fair few Tricity's in northern Thailand this past Jan & Feb '15 (rode: 8 weeks 22500km China-Laos-Thailand & return). Myself I was not interested in the Tricity in the slightest despite being somewhat interested in the MP3-500 for a number of years. For me the wee 125cc engine is just too under-powered to push along the increased weight of the scoot. IMO the Tricity would do better with a 300cc+.

I did however have a blast riding a PCX150 for a couple of weeks in a previous 7 week trip to northern Thailand (Jan & Feb '14) with the auto-engine stop. Fantastic little scoot, and very frugal on the gas. The Honda Forza 300 is also quite popular in Thailand too, especially with some of the expats.
 

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:shock:

Say it ain't so
 
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