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Discussion Starter #1
I just traded in my Silverwing with 618 miles on it and picked up my new Burgman 650.


WOW!


What a difference! The Burgman is superior in almost every way. It handles significantly better than the silverwing. The transmission is in a class by itself. There's much more legroom for the driver, and the passenger seat is more comfortable. The headlights are better, the brakes are better.

The only thing is, when idling, the Burgman sounds like a diesel truck. What's the deal with that?

I think the ride was a little smoother on the silverwing, but that is the only place that i think was better, and only slightly.

I'm proud to be an owner of the Burgman. And i guess you are, too!
 

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Hi Dave :wave: and welcome to the board. Congrats on your new 650 and I too think there an awesome machine. The dieseling noise occurs only at idling when the tranny doesnt have any load on it. Others have had there dealers replace a small gear only for the noise to come back. There have been no reported problems yet as a result of this gear noise. I live with mine and have no intentions of giving my bike up for any period of time so they can work on it. I think it adds character to the machine. Funny thing is nobody else in my biking comunity has said a thing about the idle noise. I guess there over come by the machines good looks and dont hear it.

PS: try increasing the spring rate on the rear shock to see if that helps.
 

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dave allen said:
I think the ride was a little smoother on the silverwing, but that is the only place that i think was better, and only slightly.
I recently installed Ikon shocks on mine and the ride was substantially improved.

Contact Chris at Eurotech Motorsports if interested.

http://www.eurotechmotorsports.com/
530-345-7145
[email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks for the tip about the rear shocks. Just curious, are they aftermarket retro-fit fork springs as well available?
 

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dave allen said:
thanks for the tip about the rear shocks. Just curious, are they aftermarket retro-fit fork springs as well available?
I wish there were. Eventually, we will probably see them. However, just doing the shocks is very worthwhile. I might try going to a higher weight fork oil to increase damping effect, but progressive rate springs would be very nice to have.

The Ikons have progressive rate springs, and four position damping adjustment. I found that position 3 on the damping, and the lightest spring preload, works well for solo riding. I'd click the spring preload up a notch for carrying a passenger.

There is also a French company (Fornales) that makes an air shock for the Burgman 650. They don't have a distributor in the USA as far as I know. I mentioned it to Chris at Eurotech Motorsports where I got the Ikons, and he has contacted them. Might be something come of that, but I think they will cost more than the Ikons.
 

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DonRich90 said:
Hey Paul, how difficult is to to install the Ikons? :D
Being first in the USA to try them, I had a problem - I've written it up elsewhere here. Basically, you need a spacer, 20mm in length, to fill in the top hole of the shock. These shocks were made to fit several cycles - not just the Burgman, so the hole at the top is too big for the AN650. Once you have the appropriate spacer, installation is not difficult. Unfortunately the spacers weren't supplied initially.

If you go through Chris at EuroTech Motorsports he knows all about this now - just remind him that you'll need the correct spacers - he machined the ones for me. (The manufacturer had sent me spacers of the proper diameter, but 25mm in length, which is too long. Chris machined them down to 20mm in length, which was perfect.)

Set the damping wheel to 3 before installing the shocks, because it'll be hidden up behind the bodywork after the shocks are installed. You can mount the shocks so that the damping wheel is pointed inward - so technically you could re-adjust the damping after the shocks are installed, but I found it much easier to adjust damping with the shocks off. The instructions suggested a damping setting of 2 for a solo rider, but I found that 3 gives a more controlled ride. Setting 3 should also work well for two up.

Leave the spring preload at the lightest setting for solo riding. The springs are much stronger than the stockers. I weight 225, have a Givi trunk, and always carry some heavy stuff (CruzTool kit, air pump, tire repair kit, etc) under the seat. I tried both the lowest and middle preload settings - the instructions are correct in recommending the first position for solo riding. Jack them to the middle position when you are going to carry a passenger (a tool is provided).

Use the bottom bolts from the stock shocks. They supply a set of bolts with the Ikon shocks, but they are a little shorter, so I didn't use them.

For tools you'll need a metric ratchet set - I think it was a 24mm socket. A rubber mallet also came in handy for tapping the bottom shock bracket into alignment after fastening the top. Do the top first, since you are working by feel - it is hidden from sight by the bodywork. You can see the bottom bracket, so if you need to fuss with bolt hole alignment a bit it is easier. I had to raise the swingarm just a tad to get the bottom bolt holes aligned. I did that by tapping a wood block under the rear wheel with the rubber mallet. Do one side at a time. If you remove both stock shocks first, the rear wheel will drop to the ground, lowering the swingarm with it. It is quite heavy & you might need some help raising it back up (don't ask how I know...).

That's about it. Now you know everything I didn't know when I set about this project, so it will be quite easy.
 

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Burgman vs. Silverwing

dave allen

I did exactly as you by selling my silverwing and buying (ultimately) a Burgman. In the interim I purchased an Atlantic, so I have owned all three. There is no question that the Burgman is far superior to the other two. The comfort of the Burgman is unmatched and it can be ridden all day. Not possible on the other two. Good luck!
 

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ikon shocks

Hi Paul,

Great to hear some good feedback on the Ikons.

Just replaced the rear tyre and it was badly scalloped like the damage caused by worn shock absorbers.

I have very high expectations about these shocks.

Being a long time Koni shock user on most of my race bikes and 4 wheel drives.

They are great.

Should be easy to source for me as they are actually manufactured in Australia.

An Aussie company bought out the design and tooling from Koni, move the "i" and made Ikon.

Gotta love all that legal crap...

nev
 

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Mention made above about the French made Fournale Shocks: can't comment about any made for scoots, but a couple years ago I bought a pair for a light airplane...for $400 usd...and while they performed well, the chrome began to seriously peel in a short time.
 

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Excellent notoriety in France
No spring, only gas compressed, ...
[cite] ... New "Fournalès" system with two fittings which enables the suspension of your motorbike to be instantly adapted, according to its loading.
Suspension shock absorber with built-in solo/dual riding adjustment.
The Dual system, an exclusive innovation from Fournalès, includes an external pressure reserve which enables two gas chambers to be connected. [/cite]




http://www.fournales.fr website in french and english.
catalog Fournales
http://www.fournales.fr/catalogue/Catalogue.xls
follow folio bottom index "BI-AM S->T"

SUZUKI 650 BURGMAN (length between axis 365mm) réf.: MA010284(7,5 pression bar)
I don't know exact price... + 500 euro, and , nor if there are points of foreigner sales .
 
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