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I really like riding this scooter, but had I known what a PITA it is to remove bodywork on this scooter, I may not have bought one.
How about you?

Admittedly, this is my first time removing bodywork to get to the sidestand switch connector, so it's p;robably not surprising to some of you that it took me 2 hours to get the switch connector exp;osed.
 

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I can compare it to my other sym scooter. the plastic quality is far better on the burg for sure, but whats annoying is why the heck did they feel they need so many different fasteners for one plastic. just use 1 size screws or bolts and be done with it. the side leg shields is really annoying to remove. those push pins are a nightmare. and the bottom connecting plastic is annoying to deal with.

biggest annoyance is the cvt box. why couldnt they use just one one size bolt for the plastic cover and one for the metal shield all around? how ridiculous that all of the 10 bolts all around are different sized. the sym has 4 bolts for the plastic cover and all the same size, and the metal cover is with 13 bolts all the same except the middle which is long. air filter box is also another thing. not easy to close the cover. its a battle.

and why they couldnt design the gear oil drain out of the cover for easy maintenance. and that annoying cvt gasket. it never stays in place. glad the sym doesnt have one. also the spedometer cable..cmon now.

but there are smarter designs they did with the burg then the sym.
 

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I agree with the front leg shield being a PITA. Removing the rear side panels and passenger foot rests is a nightmare. Using screws to hold these parts together would've been easier to work on. The look of the burg is clean due to no visible screws. It's a mess but I'd still get a newer version of the big bad Burg if Suzy puts out a modern one. Maybe! 🤔
 

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I really like riding this scooter, but had I known what a PITA it is to remove bodywork on this scooter, I may not have bought one.
How about you?

Admittedly, this is my first time removing bodywork to get to the sidestand switch connector, so it's p;robably not surprising to some of you that it took me 2 hours to get the switch connector exp;osed.
Pick one or more answers or comments:

1) Well, you get used to it after a while, learn to be very careful and patient, try not to work in very cold garages, and to buy a box of extra pop-pin-rivet things on Amazon.

After owning an Exec for five years, and then taking a break for four years from Burgs, I did, in fact, still buy a second one. So I knew what I was getting into, in terms of bodywork, to directly answer your question. But I also knew what I was getting back into in terms of handling, storage, weather protection, and other fun things.

2) It seems to be the nature of scooters, making them look streamlined, or car-like, or non-threatening, or something. One of my tupperware-related gripes along those lines has always been that they all seem to come with handlebar covers, and it must be for one or more of those it's-the-nature-of-scooter reasons. But it makes adding bar-back/risers and RAM-balls frustratingly complex; non-scooter motorcycles don't seem to need handlebar covers.

So the answer here is to buy a non-scooter, i.e., a "standard" or "naked" bike (or even some baggers and cruisers). I had a Victory for five years, and -- get this! -- an oil and filter change required removal of nothing -- no screws, no bolts, no rivets, no plastic, no chrome, nada, zilch -- except the filter itself, the drain plug, and the dipstick.

Of course, with the standards -- say, a Royal Enfield 650 instead of the Exec, and you'd have no extra tupperware, certainly -- you get a lot less storage (although a lot less weight, too).

3) Back to the realm of scooters, @s-steel points out that the Burgs seem to be better -- less frustrating -- in the tupperware dept. than the Syms. I'll point out that my new Beemer is better in that respect than the two Big Burgers I've owned. If you have a minute, check out the image and, especially, the caption of this particular pic in my BMW gallery:

 
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The bodywork fun is probably one of the last reasons I'd avoid buying a Burgman for. Heck it even has it's merits.
I've been looking longingly at but avoiding 650s lately due to having to take the whole thing apart to change the belt. If that weren't the case I'd still have one.
 

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2) It seems to be the nature of scooters, making them look streamlined, or car-like, or non-threatening, or something. One of my tupperware-related gripes along those lines has always been that they all seem to come with handlebar covers, and it must be for one or more of those it's-the-nature-of-scooter reasons. But it makes adding bar-back/risers and RAM-balls frustratingly complex; non-scooter motorcycles don't seem to need handlebar covers.

So the answer here is to buy a non-scooter, i.e., a "standard" or "naked" bike (or even some baggers and cruisers). I had a Victory for five years, and -- get this! -- an oil and filter change required removal of nothing -- no screws, no bolts, no rivets, no plastic, no chrome, nada, zilch -- except the filter itself and the dipstick.

Of course, with the standards -- say, a Royal Enfield 650 instead of the Exec, and you'd have no extra tupperware, certainly -- you get a lot less storage (although a lot less weight, too).
Did that. It's really hard to go back to not having storage once you've gotten used to it.

Also bought a second Burgman (a 200, to go with my 650).
 

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For body panels most of the bikes I've owned are very similar. So when I bought a Burgman 650 I was accustomed to working with interlocking body panels and getting to hard to access areas of a bike. Try separating the top case from the tail of a Gold Wing! And just changing the air filter on a CTX1300 is almost major surgery to get the top shelter (false tank) off to get to it. It was no big deal to me. The kinds of bikes I prefer all have body panels that are sometimes easier or sometimes harder to work with. I also learned early on how to work with those plastic rivets so I didn't need a dozen extras, though I did have a half dozen extra pins for just in case. I do agree that getting the CVT off the 650 is really bad. I believe there definitely could have been a minor change to the frame to make it a lot easier and to avoid dropping the entire engine to get to it.
 

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You ain't seen nuthun until you work with Yamaha maxi scooter Tupperware.

After a Yamaha TMAX 500 and a Yamaha Majesty 400 (both totaled in traffic wrecks) my Burgman 400 Tupperware is a breeze to work with. After a year and a half of ownership I haven't broken any tabs yet, and no gaps between the panels after I'm done either. :giggle:
 

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Not tried any tupperware removal and I have to say looking at it, it is also something that would fill me with dread but it certainly wouldn’t put me off buying one.
Spannering as you guys call it, is now a distant memory due to my ailments, I now let my local shop take care of all the stress although I did manage to change the front brake pads and swore then that it was the last mechanical job I did on a bike an easy job but the after effects on me weren’t worth it I struggle putting air in the tyres these days.
 

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Yes, I bought one after knowing.
I think it was fear from people that have never done maintenance. It's not that bad.
I prefer two phases. I remove the plastics needed one day and clean inside. Perform the maintenance another day. Gives you time to remain calm and work with a cool head. Not hard once you've done it. I don't like it but love my bike. In my opinion the 650 is by far the easiest Burgman to maintain and the later model years with all the improvements are pretty much trouble free. Fluids and filters...brakes and tires, the easiest of the 650's.
 

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I worked on several different scooters and actually find the Burgman 400 plastics, etc. fairly easy to remove. I mean you can remove front cover/fairing and windshield in less than 10 minutes !!. On the CVT area, once you get the aluminum cover off, clean/lightly coat bolts, dowel pins and bearing boss on clutch with some "Anti-Seize" is also very easy. I agree that the gearbox oil drain "may be" a bad location, but is it ?:unsure:, if you follow the maintenance schedule you should have the cvt cover off about mid-life point of belt, gives you a chance to look around/blow/clean dust out, etc. Plus removing cover more regularly, lessens the chances of rusting in place.

Most of " Mitch's Scooter Stuff " videos are fairly clear on body panels, etc.

I have timed myself om my B400 on CVT servicing, starting with a closed toolbox and undisturbed scooter, I'm able to remove front and rear pulleys, inspect/check/replace belt + sliders, blow out filter and cavity, change gearbox oil, check/lube bearings, Torque to specs, remove/reinstall all access panels (including LH skirt), wipe down scooter, etc., etc., and store all tools in about 2 hrs. when using hand tools, slightly faster with power tools. Not rushing.

Can speak much on Burgman 650, but know enough to understand that the "CVT" air filter is the only "normal" service item on the CVT, the other issues are not normal and or should not happen :unsure: . Yes, sometimes manufacturers drop the ball on access to wear parts, a few months ago, friend referred/sent a co-worker to for a starter change on his 15 yrs. old/ 4.7 Tundra, because dealer quoted $1100 to replace it :unsure:, well it sits under the intake manifold and fuel lines, wiring, etc., a lot of things that could go wrong, etc., I said $300 + parts, he never called back :unsure:
 

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friend referred/sent a co-worker to for a starter change on his 15 yrs. old/ 4.7 Tundra, because dealer quoted $1100 to replace it :unsure:, well it sits under the intake manifold and fuel lines, wiring, etc., a lot of things that could go wrong, etc., I said $300 + parts, he never called back :unsure:
Friend of a friend..... He expected a freeby, mate. :rolleyes:
 

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Friend of a friend..... He expected a freeby, mate. :rolleyes:
Only people that get mechanical repair "Freebies" are "Some" Family members and " Real Friends" (IOW, people that will help you bury the ... :censored:)

Really hated (Not Really :sleep:) deflating his expectations :rolleyes:, heard that truck been sitting for a while :unsure: :whistle:
 

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I tellem I'll do it free, they provide parts an all the refreshin beverages, I only had one taker, back in 01, still workin on it, need more beverages
 
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Back on topic, the other issue with the Burgman bodywork is the push to release plastic pins, they are really nice until they age and break very easily, they are also fit very loose/sloppy and occasionally you push the center piece thru into the scooter abyss, never to be found :mad:, been buying some push pins at auto parts as needed, but it's $$$. I don't ever see myself buying Suzuki oem or similar, don't really like them. (n), last month I picked up Automotive Plastic Fastener Kit, 240 Piece (harborfreight.com) which should cover my plastic fasteners needs for all vehicles for a while :rolleyes:

I replaced most commonly removed and external push pins with # 1+2 in picture, #3 are slightly larger than 6mm ones on scooter, but I may drill out the frame holes to 6.3 (1/4 in.) as needed and use them. These pins fit and lock better in holes, material seems more flexible, in any case issue resolved (y)

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