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Is skawbey a translation of “fire keeper“ role?
Yeah it’s pronounced here as skaw - bay’ and I believe it is an Ojibway word (Ojibway is also called Saulteaux and I don’t know why.). That person is responsible for arranging the rocks in a pile that will be covered in wood and set alight. The skabey brings the hot rocks (grandfathers) into the centre pit with a shovel or pitch fork once all the participants are inside surrounding the pit. Then the skabey closes the tent and the sweat formally begins with the conductor inside labeling hot water onto the rocks and steams the place - it’s totally dark except for the dull glow coming from the rocks, and it becomes hotter each time the steam rises from freshly labeled water. We did gentle sweats - because we were working with immuno-compromised individuals - so maybe only 13 rocks. Still it is quite intense and one must stand-by attentively for the conducted will call fro the door to be opened and this is done in haste as the heat is physically harder on some then on others. This closing and opening is done 4 times. There are often prayer offerings of cedar or tobacco some sprinkled on the hot rocks. Prayers may be said, songs may be sung accompanied by drums and rattles, stories may be shared - especially in the way of teachings. There is commonly food and drink after people emerge from the lodge - often fruit. And water for sure.

Some people liken the sweat lodge to the womb. And some refer to it as their version of what white people call “going to church”.
 

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Yes it's paved all the way except for the ferry crossings. At to time of year, July would be best. By Sept it's already cooling off.
As to a Moose Whistle, don't need one. All I have to do is stay far enough behind you that I can stop before the wreckage! 🤣🤣🤣
Yes, well I can see from the graphs that warm clothing would be essential and rain gear as well. That north point is very close to Labrador - does one (can one) ride up the Labrador coast and ferry over or does one ferry over from Cape Breton to St Johns and then ride the length of the province? The latter I presume.

Regarding Moose, I would think those mothers are tall enough that passing under them would be a more likely scenario than nailing them solidly.
 
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Ojibway is also called Saulteaux and I don’t know why.
When I read up on your earlier information about Cheif Peguis it said he was born near Sault Sainte Marie and lead his band from there to settle on the Red River

Sault is French for “rapids”, Sault Ste. Marie = St. Mary’s Rapids

so Saulteaux = either “People of the rapids” or “Sault Ste. Marie clan” for the Anishinaabe?
and for Saulteaux language their dialect of Ojibwa Algonquin?
 

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Anishinaabek - is the plural term - is more of general term like Aboriginal (to my understanding) and used by a lot of Aboriginal people to refer to themselves (ourselves). their kind or “their people”. Peguis did move his people into this area from what is now Ontario. Sault Ste Marie is pronounced: soo saint marie; whereas Saulteaux is pronounced: so - toe (rhyming syllables). There was a land swindle related to the belief that Selkirk was going to be the transportation hub because it was below the rapids and the rail would connect with water transport on Lake Winnipeg. But the city of Winnipeg out manoevred Selkirk for the prize and a set of locks was built to get boats from above the rapids (I.e. Winnipeg) to below the rapids (Selkirk). Peguis’s people got moved to less productive lands further north as their land was going to rapidly increase in value around Selkirk in anticipation of Selkirk winning the bid to be the mid continental trans Canadian rail hub. I think swindle is the right term. But that rip-off pales in comparison to the 600 million acre swindle perpetrated on the Métis by our 1st Prime Minister John A MacDonald & company. Research Métis “scrip” for that story,
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Having Smart Drinking Buddies is always the best ! and a wife that loves making breakfast at 3 a.m........ Those were the days my friend .....We’d thought they’d never end
 
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I’ve never made it as far as Newfoundland -
Nearest I got was Bay of Fundy which was spectacular, especially with the setting sun lighting up the red cliffs after walking on the shore In the fall.

Beautiful and well worth a detour.

..and I remember passing a giant lobster sculpture by the road somewhere near Moncton a few times :)
 

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Yes, well I can see from the graphs that warm clothing would be essential and rain gear as well. That north point is very close to Labrador - does one (can one) ride up the Labrador coast and ferry over or does one ferry over from Cape Breton to St Johns and then ride the length of the province? The latter I presume.

Regarding Moose, I would think those mothers are tall enough that passing under them would be a more likely scenario than nailing them solidly.
There are two ferry crossings to Newfoundland during the summer, Port aux Basques and Argentia. The Argentia ferry is the run to the eastern side of the island and is a 14 hour trip. A lot of tourists come to Argentia and then exit at Pot aux Basques. There is a ferry that runs to Labrador from the Northern Peninsula. There are a lot of videos on You Tube that show motorcycle tours in Newfoundland and Labrador.
 

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Yes, well I can see from the graphs that warm clothing would be essential and rain gear as well. That north point is very close to Labrador - does one (can one) ride up the Labrador coast and ferry over or does one ferry over from Cape Breton to St Johns and then ride the length of the province? The latter I presume.

Regarding Moose, I would think those mothers are tall enough that passing under them would be a more likely scenario than nailing them solidly.
Actually, you could ride all the way to Labrador, but it's not a trip for the faint-hearted. From Baie Comeau in Quebec, it's hwy 389, 500, & 510. However, it's about 2,400 km (1,500 miles) from Montreal with the last 1,700 km (1,070 miles) being less than ideal gravel road!!! From Baie Comeau you've also only got two possible places to get gas, and services are NONE!!! Oh, and the locals describe the mosquitos as more like small helicopters! It's pure bush riding in the extreme.

So best to take the ferries over from Nova Scotia. Besides, then you can also ride the famous Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island.

Oh, and FYI, the Province of Newfoundland logs some 600 moose collisions per year.
 

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I thought Lacrosse was Canada’s National Sport but I am only half right according to Wikipedia: In 1994 Parliament passed the National Sports of Canada Act which declared lacrosse to be "Canada's National Summer Sport", with ice hockey as the National Winter Sport.

Neither of these games is for sissies. I was in Toronto with a friend. We cam upon a lacrosse game. There were no people watching, just the coaches and the players. The coaches were urging their players on with calls for mayhem and disabling. When I joined the demands for blood and brutality with my calls for the same, my satire went unappreciated. The coaches turned such evil eyes in our direction that we felt threatened and decided that - discretion being the better part of valour - we should depart before we were made the object of the mayhem.

And you know what they say about our winter sport: I went to the fights last night and a hockey game broke out.
 
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And of course lacrosse is also broken down into Field Lacrosse and Box Lacrosse. The former played on a field about the size of a football field, the latter played indoors in an arena with the ice out.
 

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