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Outside of the Aboriginal peoples in “Canada”, the Vikings appear to have had the first permanent settlements but they died out or retreated to Greenland or Iceland. The Portuguese had summer fishing stations but the French made permanent sttlements in Nova Scotia where they were dying of rickets/scurvy until the Aboriginals showed them a winter recipe of boiled bark from the appropriate trees and plants. These settlements in Prince Edward Island, Cape Breton, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and northern Maine became to be called Acadia. Bluebottle referred to the 7 Years War in which Acadia was lost to Britain in 1713. Because many Acadians refused to make an oath of allegiance to Britain, the English started an expulsion. They rounded up the French speaking people and started deporting them down the coast of the 13 colonies and later to Britain and France. Many exportees made their way to Louisiana and the bayou country where Acadians became ‘Cajuns. For a fictional account of two lovers separated in Le Grand Derangement, see Henry Wadsorth Longfellow’s poem “Evangeline”.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Another big THANKS ducati14,

I was never taught or heard of this ....What the New World could have been.

Read the comment section:

 

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I remember first learning about Cajun culture because of the music:
Balfa Brothers, Lafayette Playboys etc

Ducatiwill know better than I do but the French strength was the voyageurs who learned the trade on the great rivers of France and put those skills to use on the Canadian waterways.
parlez-nous à boire!

Many of the Scots arrived because of ”The Clearances” in Scotland where they were thrown off the land due to new farming practices. They were actively recruited and shipped over. Some of the same people probably took part in Acadian clearances.

I spoke to some historians in Reykjavik and they were saying that the vikings of Iceland and Greenland may have known that lands existed to the west because the Norse sagas mention fighting and trading with what translates to something like “small men from the west”
(drinks were involved so I may have got that translated bit wrong)
 

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Many of the Scots arrived because of ”The Clearances” in Scotland where they were thrown off the land due to new farming practices. They were actively recruited and shipped over. Some of the same people probably took part in Acadian clearances
The expulsion of the Acadians was government sponsored ethnic cleansing. The clearances in Scotland were ethnic cleansing by landowners - get the people off the land and put the land to sheep raising to feed the woolen mills that sprang up everywhere.

So the Scott’s Lord Selkirk, in a bid to help the expelled farmers, bought into the HUDSON’S BAY CO. and got them to grant land in Manitoba to so they could re-settle many north of Winnipeg along the Red River (where there is a small city of Selkirk now). Again the Aboriginal people saved their bacon by supporting them through the bitter winters after seasons of crop failure, mosquitos and locusts. A monument in Winnipeg expresses the “everlasting“ gratitude of these Selkirk Settlers to the Ojibway (Saulteaux) Chief Peguis and his people for their kindness and generosity. My mother’s name was Sim and her Cree speaking mother was a Mackenzie - both names having the Scottish origins.

Lord Selkirk got into legal hassles with the North-West company (the Hudson Bay CO’s chief fur trading rival) that sent traders in canoe brigades out from MONTREAL as soon as the rivers unfroze each spring. The Earl of Selkirk’s good intentions ended up bankrupting him.
 

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interesting detail about Peguis, I’ll look that up.

I was thinking more of the Jocks on the ground - who got strong armed and then had to carry out those same orders themselves, rather than the ones doing the ordering.

We may be related :) part of my family also goes back to the Dalriada kingdom clans too
 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
the French made permanent sttlements in Nova Scotia where they were dying of rickets/scurvy until the Aboriginals showed them a winter recipe of boiled bark from the appropriate trees and plants.”.
Ducati14, you touched on another one of my questions Spruce Tip Beer or Tea where the indigenous tribes of Canada helped the european sailors beat Scurvy .

Also on your rides do you ever encounter Birch Forests ?
There is a fungus that grows on them called Chaga that is proving to be a major medical breakthrough?



 
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interesting detail about Peguis, I’ll look that up.

I was thinking more of the Jocks on the ground - who got strong armed and then had to carry out those same orders themselves, rather than the ones doing the ordering.

We may be related :) part of my family also goes back to the Dalriada kingdom clans too
When Peguis became a Christian, because he was leader of his people he took the name John King and is buried under that name at the old stone church north of Selkirk. His children and their children have the last name of Prince. Sgt. Tommy Prince is a revered and much decorated hero who fought in WWII and in Korea. He is buried next to the airport.

If you fly into Winnipeg for a long weekend I’ll ride you out there - I still have two Burgman currently - a big and a little.

You lost me on the Dalriada bit. Scots ? Druids?
 
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Ducati14, you touched on another one of my questions Spruce Tip Beer or Tea where the indigenous tribes of Canada helped the european sailors beat Scurvy .

Also on your rides do you ever encounter Birch Forests ?
There is a fungus that grows on them called Chaga that is proving to be a major medical breakthrough?
Well I have drunk Muskego tea. The Cree in northern Manitoba are familiar with it. I have never “needed“ anything as medicine (that I knew I needed). But the favored medicine for smudging/cleansing/praying in this neighborhood is sage.

I have yet to try brewIng beer, though I have”made” some decent Riesling a time or two. I did not actually stomp my own grapes; the juice was unfermented in a pail and I just inexpertly coaxed it to winehood.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Yes, I have seen and been blessed with Sage and something called Sweet Grass.

“Many Native tribes in North America use sweetgrass in prayer, smudging or purifying ceremonies and consider it a sacred plant. It is usually braided, dried, and burned. Sweetgrass braids smolder and doesn't produce an open flame when burned. Just as the sweet scent of this natural grass is attractive and pleasing to people, so is it attractive to good spirits. Sweetgrass is often burned at the beginning of a prayer or ceremony to attract positive energies.”

I befriended an amazing guy that followed the Ways and he chose me as one of his two helpers for his Vision Quest. We built a Sweat Lodge on the bank of the Scioto River in Ohio. Once the home of the Shawnee People.



 
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You lost me on the Dalriada bit. Scots ? Druids?
Sorry

The Dalriada (Dal Riata) was an ancient kingdom from NE Ireland.
The Romans called them “Scoti” meaning “raiders”. After the Romans left, the Dalriada invaded western Scotland and became the Scots. After some to and fro the royal families merged and the land of the Picts became Scotland

I think the Makenzie clan were part of the early Dalriada nation

BBC - Legacies - Immigration and Emigration - Scotland - Western Scotland - Dalriada: The Land of the First Scots - Article Page 1

Is it difficult to trace family ancestry generally there?
I’m thinking about lots of movement, (I think) Northern Cree lineage is maternal v European maternal, few written records on either side and conflicts where stories might be shaped be shaped to survive in changing situations.
(A family here were told they descended from an Irish Sea captain who turned out to be a London criminal on the run who needed a cover story :) )


Thank you very much for your kind offer
 

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When speaking about the Norse (Vikings) who arrived in North America, the only confirmed settlement is at L'Anse aux Meadows in northern Newfoundland (circled in red on map). Here's the Wiki information on it.
But basically, the Scandinavian Norse people "discovered" North America long before that Italian guy Christopher Columbus made his voyages some 450 years later. Of course none of this is mentioned in history books who prefer the common Columbus misconception.

Oh, and for sure there is a Burgman trip coming up to L'Anse aux Meadows but that will have to wait a few years until I retire.


90619
 

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There is also work being done by satelite geologists to find other locations - most famously Sarah Parcak (funded by BBC and National Geographic) and her discovery at Point Rosee which is yet to be excavated.

Her Satelite work uncovered previously unknown structures in Egypt and Petra
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Thanks Steve_YYZ,

I was hoping you would add to the Canadian Blarney Stone Soup...for us Southern Crackers .
 
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Steve, Is that trip up to L’Anse aux Meadows pavement all the way? If so I would certainly consider putting that trip on my list. Picking the right season would be crucial. One wouldn’t want to get caught in an ice berg breeze or a snow squall off the North Atlantic in any month - maybe early September would be optimum. And the autumn colours might be the icing on the cake.

Have you installed a Moose whistle on your bike? Que pense-tu?
 
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Yes, I have seen and been blessed with Sage and something called Sweet Grass.

Yes we use 4 ceremonial medicines - sage, sweet grass, tobacco and cedar. Sweet grass is a wiry plant and is braided like one would braid long hair in three strands. It does have a beautiful sweet smell, but is somewhat less user friendly than sage from the point of view keeping it burning as opposed to sage - it is more finicky or takes more skillful technique to use successfully.

We often started meetings in a circle outside with and elder doing a sage smudge. It’s a mostly a silent ceremony - meditative and prayer like. People wash their hands in the incense and the smoke is wafted over their bodies - yes, it is a cleansing or a ritual washing away of bad thoughts and pre-conceptions so that you can bring your best most positive self to start the day. The smoke carries the prayers and whatever is in your heart that is inexpressible, that cannot be put into words.

I have been into a few sweat lodges but I do not prefer that form; though I have assisted as fire keeper/skawbey more often - i.e. the outside person at the sweat lodge. I am more of an igloo type of person. LOL.


 
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Discussion Starter #36
Yes ! we offered tobacco for every willow cut for the lodge, I too have been fireman ...the cannonball size rocks glow so red it’s like you can see into them. The cedar pieces dance and pop upon the rocks. When the conductor ladles the water to those stones it gets Real real fast.... Like I said ours was built on the river bank and after about 20 min of sweat lodge we would jump in the water ....you could hear the river current moving smaller rocks down stream. It was a legal altered state ....

 
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Discussion Starter #38 (Edited)
Another song by the same man .....dedicated to all those that stand in the dark shadows of the New York City Buildings.


 

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Steve, Is that trip up to L’Anse aux Meadows pavement all the way? If so I would certainly consider putting that trip on my list. Picking the right season would be crucial. One wouldn’t want to get caught in an ice berg breeze or a snow squall off the North Atlantic in any month - maybe early September would be optimum. And the autumn colours might be the icing on the cake.

Have you installed a Moose whistle on your bike? Que pense-tu?
Yes it's paved all the way except for the ferry crossings. At to time of year, July would be best. By Sept it's already cooling off.
As to a Moose Whistle, don't need one. All I have to do is stay far enough behind you that I can stop before the wreckage! 🤣🤣🤣

90634
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Of course none of this is mentioned in history books who prefer the common Columbus misconception.
The people are waking up.....next we need to teach them who the Slave Traders were....

 
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