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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Are the indigenous people of Canada called Indians ? What are some of the remaining tribes ?

Were the French the first Europeans to settle in Canada ?

What about other European Emigrates English, Dutch, other ?

How did Canada become part of the British Empire ?

Do Canadians pay a TV Tax like the Brits ?

Can a Canadian just move to England ?

Is the Canadian Currency Gold Backed or the same as US currency ?

Have you ever made Maple Syrup ? Tasted Birch Syrup ?

Have you ever hunted Birch Fungus ? Chaga Tea ?

Have you ever had Spruce Tip Beer or Tea ?

Is Hockey the national sport ?

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police are they like our FBI ?

Other neat and amazing things about Canada ?
 

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Most of Canada came under Brit control at the same way as the much of the US states all the way down to Florida (included)
Won in the Seven Years War against Spain and France ending in the Treaty of Paris 1763
(Americans tend to call it The French and Indian War) and added to existing territories.

US War of independence revolutionary forces later tried to take Quebec but didn鈥檛 manage it.

US and Britain/Canada fought War of 1812 over Canadian territory - We see that as part of the larger Napoleonic Wars we were fighting at the time (and being overstretched was probably part of why US saw an opportunity)

So, War.


Europeans appeared to arrived in very early times, specifically Vikings and the Viking outlaw/banished via Iceland and Greenland, Britain and Scottish Isles.

I鈥榣l butt out now as I鈥檓 not Canadian
(apologies for smushing a complex history into a few lines, I know it was much more complex)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Bluebottle, that was a heck of a start.... Is Canada considered part of the British Empire and can Canadians just move to England ?
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)

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There is no longer a British Empire, just some British Overseas Territories such as Gibraltar, Bermuda, Falklands (Canada isn鈥檛 one of them) and the Commonwealth which is largely ex-empire countries, voluntary and does include Canada.

In 1931 the Statute of Westminster gave most domains freedom of legislation and made them effectively independent but still had to ratify changes through Britain.
Then in 1982 The Canada Act got rid of the outdated historical paperwork anomaly of Canada asking permission from UK every time they wanted to do something (reflected in Canada鈥檚 1982 Constitution Act).

Part of my family is from Gibraltar and have Gibraltar passports, which is a british passport, but a Canadian one isn鈥檛.
 

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I forgot a bit-
Canadians can鈥檛 just move to UK but it鈥檚 complicated - some can claim 鈥渞ight of abode鈥 if they were commonwealth citizens before 鈥82/83 and/or ancestral claim and work/live as they wish (I think) but mostly not and they鈥檇 have to apply first.
It needs specialised knowledge that I don鈥檛 have.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks again Bluebottle, you are a Rolling Encyclopedia.
I finished your superb movie recommendation 71 do you know of
any other works by that director ?
 

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I think he was involved in 鈥淭op Boy鈥 a TV series about drug dealers in London but I鈥檝e never seen it, didn鈥檛 interest me.
 

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Fascinating questions @DarisPakar
During my career of being in the military and now the corporate world, I have flown around the world many times and lived in foreign countries for five years through all of that, the country I could easily spend my retirement years in would be Canada. I'm glad you asked here. Looking forward to learning more.
 

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Fascinating questions @DarisPakar
During my career of being in the military and now the corporate world, I have flown around the world many times and lived in foreign countries for five years through all of that, the country I could easily spend my retirement years in would be Canada. I'm glad you asked here. Looking forward to learning more.

We have a lot of sharp Canadians here that could really help a Yankee out. I should have asked this question back in November ....now all our good northern friends are taking advantage of their 100 days of summer.
 
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We have a lot of sharp Canadians here that could really help a Yankee out. I should have asked this question back in November ....now all our good northern friends are taking advantage of their 100 days of summer.
I've flown across and stopped in several places of the frozen north but never once been there on two wheels. I'm not sure I could put up with the abbreviated riding season but I do enjoy Tim Hortons coffee when I can get it. :coffee:
 

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I'm not sure I could put up with the abbreviated riding season ..
:) My first trip to Canada during the fall I used to drive to the airport each day past a bike shop and thought I must pop in and have a look round there. One morning all the bikes had gone and it was full of snowmobiles, I clearly wasn鈥檛 thinking like a local :)
 

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Yea, I think that is part of it. They just roll with the seasons up there. At my home in Illinois (almost embarrassed to say but we do make a lot of inmates out of governors) I live far enough north to have a good long riding season and only being off the bike for 2-3 months. Also just far enough south to not get regular enough snows to own a snowmobile so I never pursued another motor sport while the bike was parked.
 

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Illinois is somewhere I know nothing about - beyond Chicago.
My neighbour crossed US East-West twice on a pedal bike and his pics of off-the-beaten-track Illinois countryside looked really interesting.
(sorry for wandering off topic)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yea, I think that is part of it. They just roll with the seasons up there. At my home in Illinois (almost embarrassed to say but we do make a lot of inmates out of governors) I live far enough north to have a good long riding season and only being off the bike for 2-3 months. Also just far enough south to not get regular enough snows to own a snowmobile so I never pursued another motor sport while the bike was parked.
Where is Blacktruck and the Motorhome now ?
 

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Where is Blacktruck and the Motorhome now ?
Just here in Illinois for a few days to see my daughter off for her deployment to the Ukraine for a year. I am usually back and forth more times but this year has been a bit different for all of the obvious reasons. The motorhome is still in Texas. The weather window was good and it was another good reason to ride the Burgman back. Also it was time to do my switch of bikes for a few months. I will be going back on the Triumph when I leave on Sunday. As much as I enjoy the Burgman, I also enjoy the Triumph but for other reasons and that's a topic for another thread so I don't hijack this thread.
 

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Geez - I go out for a ride and come back and am shocked to be asked to recall my many years of Canadian history. I beg to be allowed to do so in bits and pieces as my memory for dates and treaties and such has been waning. I have to say I was very impressed with bluebottles quick and dirty survey of the subject.

In Canada we used have Indians, Eskimos and half breeds. Our constitution now recognizes First Nations, Inuit, and M茅tis - all are Aboriginals and the previous terms are now unwelcome and dated - like referring to girls/women as birds. Passee and even offensive; however tone is everything.

Most of the province I live in was given by King Charles II to the Hudson鈥檚 Bay Company Under the Governorship of Prince Rupert (1763) The company was created to trade in beaver pelts and other furs. All the lands that drain into the Hudson鈥檚 Bay became Rupertsland with the stroke of a pen and went from the Rockies to the northern Prairies U.S. states, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba and a good part of Ontario and Quebec. Colonialism as its finest. All the early staff of the Hudson鈥檚 Bay posts were from Britain especially Scots and especially Orkney Islanders. These gentlemen, not being able to overlook the beauty and talent of the local aboriginal women often took country wives and their children were called country-borns and were the western genesis of the people - of which I am one. The Metis had to kick Canadian ass to make sure Manitoba got full provincial rights when the Hudson鈥檚 Bay Company GAVE us to Canada (1870) - which in those days was mainly Quebec and Ontario, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and PEI. The M茅tis won that battle but lost a second 鈥渁rmed resistance鈥 to Canada at Batoche in Saskatchewan (1885).

Until later, from Rupertsland and the heart of Turtle Island, signing off.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
A big THANKS Ducati14, you told it like you were siting on a cabin front porch wrapped in a nice woolen blanket watching it all while a country wife was making you a nice warm sandwich. What鈥檚 the stripes mean on you Hudson Bay Blanket ?
 

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The most iconic Hudson's Bay Point Blanket colours 鈥 white with red, indigo, green and yellow stripes 鈥 have no specific meaning. The colours were popular when the blankets were first produced, and are sometimes known as Queen Anne's colours, as they were favoured during her reign (1702鈥14).Dec 18, 2018
 
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Discussion Starter #20
I鈥檓 sorry I was guilty of this misconception about the small lines called points :

Wikipedia :

Point systemEdit
Points are short black lines woven into the selvage of the blanket along the edge just above the bottom set of stripes. About four inches in length (except in the case of half points, which are two inches), they indicate the finished overall size (area) of a blanket and allow a blanket's size to be easily determined even when folded. The point system was invented by French weavers in the mid-1700s since then, as now, blankets were shrunk as part of the manufacturing process. The word point derives from the French empointer, meaning "to make threaded stitches on cloth."

Over the centuries the sizes of blankets have shifted, particularly during the 1900s as beds became larger. Blankets of 2.5, 3, 3.5 and 4 point were most common during the fur trade era. Today Hudson's Bay blankets are commonly found in point sizes of 3.5 (twin bed), 4 (double), 6 (queen) and 8 (king).[1]

The misconception persists that originally the points were an indication of the blanket price in beaver pelts or even its weight. Thickness and quality are the same blanket to blanket, and a larger blanket will naturally weigh more.[1]
 
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