Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
OK, I am in Colorado and approaching my first winter and will be putting the Burgman 400 away for a couple months. Any suggestions on things that need to be done to keep it in shape for that first ride in the Spring? I know the manual has some info but I am looking for feedback from the experienced ones out there. Thanks a lot!

:roll:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,296 Posts
Hi Pat

WELCOME to the forum! :hello2:

Never done it myself but by the power of google I bring you this andthis or even that

I can also recommend you invest in a battery conditioner, if you do not already have one. Maybe this sort of investment may be warranted linky - sure there will be something similar on your side of the pond. A useful (funny) related thread here.

A completely alternative and British way to approach the problem can be found here

Hope this has been both helpful and amusing.

PS: Amended the 'that' link - to point directly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
What I do for Winterizing.

1. I put Sta-bil in the gas tank and fill it up. It is best to have the tank full to prevent any condensation or rust from developing. The Sta-bil keeps the gas from going bad over the Winter.

2. I try to change the oil relatively late in the riding season. The fresher oil, the better, because oil tends to build up acids as you put miles on it. I'm not sure if the synthetics are any more or less prone to that than conventional oil - I do use synthetics.

3. I keep the battery on a smart charger. I currently use Battery Tender Jrs, and they work fine. You can get them for about $20 at Arizona Motorsports. I do not remove the battery from the bike since I have a garage with convenient power outlets.

That's about it. I've been doing this for a number of years with good results. One advantage is that the motorcycle or scooter is ready to ride if we catch a few mild days during the Winter. I do normally get a ride or two in. I have electrically heated riding gear, so it is road conditions (snow, ice, sand and salt) that keep my bikes off the road more than the cold. At worst, the bikes sit for 3 months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
NormanB said:
Hi Pat
Never done it myself but by the power of google I bring you this andthis or even that
Well let me say this about that, but coming from the standpoint of a 4-wheeler. I've used the Burgy 650 as my primary source of transportation for many weeks. The next thing I knew, when I needed to fire up the SUV, the battery was dead!! I guess this happened by just letting the SUV sit there all this time while it watched the 650 getting all the attention.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
All of the above, and I guess it goes with out saying, use the center stand to keep the weight off the tires, and go around the bike with a small oil can (3in1) and put a few drops on the hinges, locks, seat latch ect.
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
pek01 said:
OK, I am in Colorado and approaching my first winter and will be putting the Burgman 400 away for a couple months.

:roll:
I live in Colorado (Denver) too....unless you live in the mountains you may want to reconsider putting your bike up. I scoot to work all year 'round....
spring and summer you lose maybe 20% of the days due to rain (at least this year), autumn is usually the best, and most winters I manage to scoot 60-70% of the time....if a prolonged cold stretch occurs, I try to get out to the garage every 3 or 4 days to start my bike (unfortunately not a Burgman...yet) and let it run for a half hour. Layered clothing and a good coat do the trick...for Winter I find leather works the best...great wind breaking and warmth.

Cheers,

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
I had only storage insurance last winter, so I
was riding my bike in the undergroung parking lot
twice a week until the fan kicks in at lease a few times.
Is that good or bad for the bike? Anyone knows?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
793 Posts
My rule of thumb is to not start the engine until I'll be riding at least 30 miles.
To prevent carbon buildup and to get the PCV system to vent crankcase moisture buildup,
I am sure to take it on the highway and let it wind out.

If I can't ride it during the storage period, the first ride is a long one.
Had good luck with putting 92 octane in it before covering it up so
it starts right up in 7 weeks.

Odometer memory is non-volatile so I can disconnect and maintain the battery
indefinitely without losing milage.

On the 400K3, the first time I reconnect the battery, it makes a self-test on the
speedometer panel with both needles briefly swinging half-way to tell me it's
still working.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the winter ideas

:D
As usual you all came through and I appreciate all the input. This Board continues to a very valuable source and everyone who participates gets something out of it. Thanks again... Let's all ride safe!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
ajwood said:
My rule of thumb is to not start the engine until I'll be riding at least 30 miles.
To prevent carbon buildup and to get the PCV system to vent crankcase moisture buildup,
I am sure to take it on the highway and let it wind out.
What if all I do on a given day is a round trip of less than 10 miles. Is that something that should not be done in the winter?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,296 Posts
Bob

We are talking storage here. If you are using your machine regularly (say once a week, then ten miles is fine.

The issue is storing a bike for say 3 or 4 months and keeping the bike in best condition. Running a bike in these circumstances (just to keep it sweet' is doing the opposite and the products of combustion (sulphuric acid) end up in the sump - which is counter to the intent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
NormanB said:
Bob

We are talking storage here. If you are using your machine regularly (say once a week, then ten miles is fine.
Thanks Norman that's good to know! I don't have access to indoor parking therefore, I can't use a battery tender.

I hope to ride much more frequently than once a week. Am I understanding you correctly that it's not a problem if I were to take only one short ride a week during the winter?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,593 Posts
BobG said:
I hope to ride much more frequently than once a week. Am I understanding you correctly that it's not a problem if I were to take only one short ride a week during the winter?
Hey Bob, just a reminder that sometimes it may be impossible to ride safely for several weeks or more. I remember late last winter when we had a good bit of snow followed by a couple of weeks of freezing cold weather. The roads were a real hazard because of patches of ice everywhere. As I remember, I didn't ride for almost a month. Highly unlikely your bike battery will hold a charge for near that long sitting outside in real cold weather.
If at all possible, I'd recommend that you get a Battery Tender Jr. and bring your battery inside when we're expecting extended bad weather and/or spells of below freezing weather. For peace of mind, you could just keep the charger plugged in while you were home and/or just for a few days at a time. The inconvenience of removing and installing sure beats having the battery go dead in the bike (don't ask how I know). :D
Don
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,296 Posts
Bob

Short trips are no good for an IC engine, the measure of which is a trip where the engine does not get up to operating temperature. As i said 10 miles is fine.

I would concur with Don that while it may be a pain in the arse, removing the battery and keeping it hooked up to a battery tender is the best solution, batteries do not like low temperatures. Wiht practice you will be shipping/unshipping in less than 5 minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
Bob,

That is what I use, and I did buy it at AZ Motorsports (good price). I actually bought two of those. I keep the Burgman plugged in to one, and the V-Strom plugged in to the other. You can plug them in and forget it. They are "smart" chargers, so they will not overcharge the battery. A red light glows when they are charging - a green light glows when the battery is fully charged. Simple, inexpensive, and effective.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
Bob,

Since I have two machines, I plug them in everytime they get parked in the garage (Summer, Winter, all the time). It only takes two or three seconds. Sometimes I ride one for a couple of weeks without touching the other one - this way I don't worry about it. Both batteries are always fully charged.

The service advisor at my dealership says that a battery discharges faster in hot weather than in cold weather when it isn't used. I don't know if he's right - I always thought it was the other way around. I also have heard that if a battery is kept fully charged it won't freeze and crack in the Wintertime. I spent a few weeks researching stuff on the internet last year too. There are a lot of battery related articles, many of them don't seem to agree on everything, and some of them are just too technical for me. I soon decided that it was less painfull to spend $19.95 on each bike, than to wade through more of that discussion...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,593 Posts
In mild weather, if your battery is in good condition, it should hold a charge for more than 2 weeks. I've had bikes sit longer than that and didn't have any problems.
Yuasa sells a battery charger under their name that is about the size of the Battery Tender Jr. But, I read an article recently (Motorcycle Consumer News, I think) where they have had problems with the Yuasa chargers. From what I've seen in recent years, the Battery Tender brand has always been highly rated.

Don
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top