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I heard on the news today that gas prices have dropped approx. 12 cents recently . They said it was mainly due to changing from summer gas to winter gas and winter gas was cheaper to produce . My question is what is the difference and why is it cheaper to produce?

Bob
 

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mainly cheaper add-on product = cheaper price. Gas in winter are more lighter, have a lower boiling-point.

if you live in a sub-zero state or province, probability than you gas will freeze in your tank is reduce or at a minimum of zero.

the summer gas is the opposite.
 

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Additional chemicals are added to summer gas to make it less likely to evaporate into the atmosphere during warm weather. This evaporation adds to ozone pollution and summer smog. These chemicals make it more expensive and make it a bit harder to ignite as the temperatures drop.

So when the weather turns cold in parts of the US and gas doesn't evaporate as readily, these chemicals can be removed to make the gas easier to ignite in cold temperatures.

New England, California and many major cities are also required to sell only "reformulated" gas that contains substances called "oxygenates" to further reduce pollutants.
 

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Eating more Chilli and Stews give me Winter Gas. :oops:
 

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DL-11 said:
Additional chemicals are added to summer gas to make it less likely to evaporate into the atmosphere during warm weather. This evaporation adds to ozone pollution and summer smog. These chemicals make it more expensive and make it a bit harder to ignite as the temperatures drop.

So when the weather turns cold in parts of the US and gas doesn't evaporate as readily, these chemicals can be removed to make the gas easier to ignite in cold temperatures.

New England, California and many major cities are also required to sell only "reformulated" gas that contains substances called "oxygenates" to further reduce pollutants.
And further reduce gas mileage. Damned tree huggers. Last week the price difference along the Colorado River between Arizona & the PDRK (People's Demokratik Republik of Kalifornia) reached as high as $2.00/gal.
 

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From http://auto.howstuffworks.com/fuel-effi ... -fuel1.htm:

Summer-grade fuel has a different Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) than winter-grade fuel, which contributes to its being (marginally) more eco-friendly. RVP is the vapor pressure of gasoline measured at 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Fuels with higher RVP evaporate more easily than those with lower RVP. A particular fuel blend's RVP is based on the combined RVP of the ingredients that make up the blend. Regulators worry about this evaporation because it contributes to ozone formation.

Gasoline must have an RVP below 14.7 PSI (pounds per square inch), which is normal atmospheric pressure; if a fuel's RVP were greater than 14.7 PSI, excess pressure would build up in the gas tank, and the fuel could boil and evaporate. Depending on the part of the country, the EPA's standards mandate an RVP below 9.0 PSI or 7.8 PSI for summer-grade fuel. Some local regulations call for stricter standards. Because of these varying RVP standards, up to 20 different types of boutique fuel blends are sold throughout the U.S. during the summer [Source: Slate].

Because RVP standards are higher during the winter, winter-grade fuel uses more butane, with its high RVP of 52 PSI, as an additive. Butane is inexpensive and plentiful, contributing to lower prices. Summer-grade fuel might still use butane, but in lower quantities -- around 2 percent of a blend.


gruntled: I hear ya. Here in Kalifornia North (Washington State) we've taken to emulating the Kalifornia smog laws - passing damned near verbatim your CARB laws here about 4-5 years ago. Result? New car prices rose about 7%. Lives saved? Probably zero. But you just can't put a pricetag on feel-good nanny state crap can you? I'm just glad they didn't force vintage car owners such as myself (71 Karmann Ghia) to toe the emissions line from back in the 1970s. I'd have a hell of a time getting a pair of 44mm Weber IDF carbs to 'emit' properly.
 
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