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Discussion Starter #1
How should the rear passenger dress differently from the driver? (if at all)
I would think the feet are more exposed to the wind on the rear seat.

How about the head, hands, eyes, and torso etc.

Let's hear some opinions, tips, suggestions.

I'm curious, and I have to outfit my wife soon :)
 

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Passenger should wear the same protective gear as the rider. This really has nothing to do about wind. Wind may annoy, but it is falls that can hurt you.

Ironically, the passenger seat is a windy place to be on almost any motorcycle with a windscreen or fairing. The windscreen is designed to push the air aside for the rider - but that air has to collapse back at some point. And usually it collapses back right about where the passenger sits. This is also "rough" air, since it has been disturbed by the windscreen.

I owned a Goldwing once. Beautiful protective air envelope for the rider, but my wife assured me it was not the same on the passenger seat.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Paul.
So I'm thinking that her boots should be able to accomodate extra socks etc., etc.
 

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Rick,

Boots should fit snugly. You don't want them coming off in a fall, and a sloppy fit will cause discomfort when walking in them. I don't think she is going to want to ride with you in extremely cold temperatures anyway. My wife picks the 3 or 4 most perfect Summer weather days to go riding with me. If there is a cloud in the sky, or temps are chilly - I am on my own! In years past she was more adventurous - even riding her own motorcycle in mixed rain and snow for about 200 miles as we struggled to get home from a trip. If your wife does wish to ride in cold weather, then you'll probably need a bit of additional gear - but I'd buy comfortable & safe warm weather gear first.
 

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Your scooter should differ from a Big road bike in one way, Your passenger will be up close to you, this will help there comfort a little because the turbulence coming off the windshield will almost make it behind them - the key word is almost - but really it should be better then on a larger bike.
There is really no reason for your rider to need any more protection then you from the elements.
You may want to take a few short trips and get feed back from your wife before going for any super expense or special gear you may not need.
 

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I know my lady friend passenger compains that her legs and feet get cold on those cooler days.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
allwalk said:
I know my lady friend passenger compains that her legs and feet get cold on those cooler days.
Maybe gators or chaps then?
 

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The wind definitely gets my little boy's legs and feet way more than they do mine when I ride him around on the 650. Other than that though he's pretty well blocked from any other air, but he's a lot smaller than me in the saddle as well. In a nut shell, the driver's feet and legs are much better protected than the passenger.
 

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lilleyen said:
Maybe gators or chaps then?
I see a lot of "bikers" and riders who wear leather chaps whenever the temperature gets even moderately chilly, to combat the wind-chill factor. I think that would be a great way to make the rear passenger more comfortable even on a fully-faired scooter.

I see a lot of "Goldwing Couples" out this time of year wearing matching "snowmobile suits." That's a possibility you might want to look at as well.

The few times I've been caught out in cool & damp conditions, my legs got cold despite the fairing. I pulled over and put on my rain pants (and rain jacket once on the Oregon coast when it got really cool and damp), and I felt much more comfortable. Since I always carry my rain suit anyway this isn't something I have to remember to bring. Although rain suits aren't designed for insulation, they are pretty wind-resistant and provide an extra air-trapping layer over whatever you're wearing under them. Considering the relatively low cost of a good motorcycle rain suit (my is a Nelson-Rigg brand), I recommend that as the first step.

HTH.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Randy said:
snipped
You may want to take a few short trips and get feed back from your wife before going for any super expense or special gear you may not need.
Good advice!
I'll take it thanks, Randy
 

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Wind

There's a lot of wind coming down around the passenger's feet and lower legs. Make sure they're wearing high boots or nylon wind pants to prevent exposure down low.
 
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