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I don't know why not. It's the same size of tire I'm running on the rear of mine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not being a tire expert I thought wise to ask the group. Did not know if there might be differences on the seating part of the tire.
 

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No all brands of tires will seat the same on any given wheel size. Now a car tire will seat on a motorcycle rim as all of us that have gone to the darkside can attest. Isn't easy though. ;)
 

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I had my nephew mount the CT on my 650. He used some silicone gel that is very slippery. It worked very well. That tire size is the same as what I've got. Should mount with no interference. It corrected my speedometer by a bit - at 70 indicated GPS shows me doing 66 IIRC - it was ~64 with the stock tire. A 65 height tire would put the speedometer almost dead on from what Dave J says. I opted for the lower profile to avoid any interference issues. I did stiffen the shock setting.
 

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I'm no expert on darksiding, perhaps someone can chime in here. But that particular tire tread doesn't look even on both sides of the tire; the tread on the left looks bigger than the one right of center.

On a car this would be no big deal because you have a tire on either side of the car; there is balance. But on a bike, perhaps while riding on wet roads, would that be enough to cause an imbalance? I've no idea, just saying.
 

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The fact that the word BLEM is included in the description doesn't exactly fill me with confidence either. With four wheels, I'd probably take the chance on buying a blemished tire; with two wheels, not so much.
 

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I'm no expert on darksiding, perhaps someone can chime in here. But that particular tire tread doesn't look even on both sides of the tire; the tread on the left looks bigger than the one right of center.

On a car this would be no big deal because you have a tire on either side of the car; there is balance. But on a bike, perhaps while riding on wet roads, would that be enough to cause an imbalance? I've no idea, just saying.
From what I've read, you can't feel any difference in practice, but it looks wrong/ unaesthetic.
 

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I agree with Erik, I have had a tire on that had two different halfs tread pattern and it rode OK. But I try to get a pattern that is kind of even.
 

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Most of the tires that I've seen that have an asymmetrical tread pattern are USUALLY UNIDIRECTIONAL. That is they are made to roll in ONE direction only and as such there are tires for the left side and the opposite tread design for the right side.
I wouldn't use that if it was free, including mounting.
But then again, that's just me.
 

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Most of the tires that I've seen that have an asymmetrical tread pattern are USUALLY UNIDIRECTIONAL. That is they are made to roll in ONE direction only and as such there are tires for the left side and the opposite tread design for the right side.
I wouldn't use that if it was free, including mounting.
But then again, that's just me.
That might be true for tires for Ferraris and Corvettes, but in the sizes relevant to us, the asymmetrical tires are marked with "outside", so they rotate clockwise on the right side wheels and counterclockwise on the left side wheels.

The right hand turns are sharper in right-hand traffic, so I'd mount an asymmetrical tire with "outside" facing left.
 
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