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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Still looking over my newly arrived left-over stock 2013 2-color 400.
Noticed no oil light....why is that? Even my cheap Kymco LIKE has an oil light. What is the thinking on this?

Also, is there any reason NOT to install a battery tender quick connect for my Beltran tender.

Did the first oil & filter change of that 27 month old oil at 45 miles.
MAN do those factory techs shoot these fasteners on t i g h t !! Even the filter's 8mm bolts nearly lifted me off of the floor!
Every time I remove a factory-shot nut, bolt or screw on one of my scooters - it is the same issue! Have learned to use the proper Japanese phillips screw drivers to keep from stripping things.

And I'll stick this on here: After 20 mins of riding at very moderate speeds I see why so many hate the stock screen. Is there a quick answer to a shorty/sport screen that fits a 2013 AN400 - that is not out-of-stock? (like the ermax)

Thanks in advance....
Stig
 

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Hi stig, you are right. There is no oil/pressure warning light on these bikes. The reason for that is...the bike uses needle roller and ball bearings on the crankshaft. These operate at very low oil pressure of around 15psi. Some of the bearings also just receive their lubrication from 'splashed or squirted' oil. The oil pressure at the crank journals/bearings cannot be maintained due to the nature/design of the bearings, they leach oil pressure. These cannot seal the pressure in like plain bearings and so a pressure gauge is useless and will not work. So, it's simply not required. All bikes using this type of crank bearing arrangement is the same. The most important thing is to check the oil often as it will use some oil in the early days of riding until it has a few thousand miles on the clock. And don't forget to check the oil the way it says in the owners manual, NOT the workshop manual. Enjoy!
 

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I have used Battery Tender Jr.'s for years. When I park my bike in the motorcycle shed, I put it on the tender. Batteries last a lot longer that way. I feel that stators and rectifier/regulators last longer when a battery tender is used regularly also.

Doug
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi stig, you are right. There is no oil/pressure warning light on these bikes. The reason for that is...the bike uses needle roller and ball bearings on the crankshaft. These operate at very low oil pressure of around 15psi. Some of the bearings also just receive their lubrication from 'splashed or squirted' oil. The oil pressure at the crank journals/bearings cannot be maintained due to the nature/design of the bearings, they leach oil pressure. These cannot seal the pressure in like plain bearings and so a pressure gauge is useless and will not work. So, it's simply not required. All bikes using this type of crank bearing arrangement is the same. The most important thing is to check the oil often as it will use some oil in the early days of riding until it has a few thousand miles on the clock. And don't forget to check the oil the way it says in the owners manual, NOT the workshop manual. Enjoy!
Thank you Quantum!
OK, so I can quit worrying about that oil light!
And, yes will keep an eye on the oil level.
Did the 1st oil & filter change at around 45 miles.
Will do the gear oil when my service manual gets here in a few days....though I really doubt that Suzuki used inferior oils off the assembly line.
Have never ridden a scoot with a wind screen before - so maybe all that engine clatter is expected....and assume it is harder to smoothly spin a 400cc single compared to my smoother 287cc Forza? Maybe it smooths out at higher revs....which I can't do, yet.

Thanks again, Stig
 

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Yes, your engine will get quieter and smoother as you do more miles. It's very tight at the moment which does cause some extra vibes and noise. Enjoy!
 

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I'd bet one (non-existent) pay check that the factory assemblers torqued all the fasteners to spec, it was the original dealer who charged $$$ for "dealer prep" that ham-fisted the h**l out of the bolts and plugs.

MAN do those factory techs shoot these fasteners on t i g h t !! Even the filter's 8mm bolts nearly lifted me off of the floor!
Stig
 

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Strangely no. The dealers don't need to actually do that during the pre-delivery inspection and checks. They just assemble the machine and check everything is to spec and safe and running fine. Checking the spark plug and the oil filter cover bolts for example is not needed or done at pre-delivery of the machine. The oil filter cover nuts for example at the factory only get torqued to 8 or 10 nm's (can't remember which it is right now!) and the spark plug to 11nm. That's not much more than finger tight! But the thing that makes nuts and bolts on new machines "seem" tight is "stiction" caused by a number of factors such as rough new threads, dry threads and bolt head seating etc etc. Although the bolts and nuts are self lubricating with zinc or zinc chromate finishes, they are a bit stiff the first time or two they are undone. If techs did the nuts and bolts up as tight as the op indicated the threads would have stripped right out. They haven't and they are fine. Its just the newness. Mine was the same. It's normal.
 

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No kidding. I assumed "dealer prep" included filling all the fluids, i.e. the bike arrives dry from the factory.
 

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Not unless things have changed in the last couple of years. All bikes arrive with the engines buttoned up, oil in, coolant in etc. They don't want corrosion or too much condensation forming in the engine, which would happen otherwise. Don't forget the bikes are all tested at the factory on the dyno to make sure they output the correct level of power. They hook them up to the computers and run the bikes briefly up to 3/4, then briefly, full throttle to make sure the bike is running correctly and smoothly throughout the rev range. It must meet certain criteria to be released for shipment. The operative doing the test can make electronic adjustments to the ecu as needed from the saddle as he tests, controlling fuelling and ignition. Any bike not meeting specs and not easily correctable is pulled from the line and taken into the workshop for more testing and adjustments. I watched several bikes going through this procedure a while back on a visit to the factory. Interesting to see. I learned quite a lot that day.
 
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