Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,041 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Which is the best shock setting to use? I ride one up and carry the typical stuff in my trunk and top case. Typical for me is rain gear, first aid kit, small cooler with 4-5 bottles of water, lock, tire patch kit, camera, purse (I'm a girl so it's OK) and light weight polar fleece sweater.

What about for longer trips when I have trunk and top case packed for travel? Should I change the shock settings?

I'm vertically challenged at 5'3" and 125 lbs. I ride the 650 and use the AirHawk pillow for comfort.

Janine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
Janine,

You might want to set the shocks one setting higher when loaded for touring. Sometimes I don't, but I ride with my shocks a bit on the stiff side even when riding solo.

The important thing is to put heavier items in the underseat trunk and lighter stuff in the top box when you pack for touring. This will minimize any adverse affect on handling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Shock Settings

Hey Paul don't forget you and I are not running stock shocks and I'm not using stock springs. I would set the stock springs for your size and load at 1 or 2 but not any higher unless you have a passenger or start carring bowling balls.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,041 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Will the shock setting affect the handling of the scooter? I think they are set on 4 now. I have the stock shocks. Say that three times :lol:

Janine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
Janine,
At your weight and height you could set your shocks at the 1 or 2 position. As you increase preload, the rear end of the bike increases in height, something you probably wouldn't want. If you carry extra weight in the form of luggage or a passenger you might want to increase the preload to 3 or 4.

Cheers,

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Hi Janine,
I think for your size and weight solo you should be on 1 or 2 and use the tool in your under seat tool pouch to adjust the rear shocks by one notch as you increase the load. You also have to take into account the wear factor which after a while you will have to compensate for. I don't have a workshop manual for the Burgman yet but my previouse bikes have had a sag setting which would help to determine the best setting for you. You could ask at your local dealer. Don't set them too hard as the back end will tend to hop over bumps in the road instead of the wheel following the contours.

Ian :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
969 Posts
Okay.
IhavethestockshocksIhavethestockshocksIhavetheshtocksocks. Heh. I guess I couldn't do it. :D

I'll just do: Thatthatthat. Hah! Nailed taht one! :oops:

No. Seriously. No. Seriously. I use the highest setting. I'm around 160 lbs., and generally forget to load anything in the trunk. I use it because it scrapes a little less in the corners. :shock:

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Janine,

I weigh 160 lbs. and ride on 1 solo, 2 with passenger (110 lbs) and 3 with underseat-storage and top-case full (and I mean really full and heavy)
I will add the Givi E21 side cases and will probably adjust to 4 when all is fully loaded.

Hope this helps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,041 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Today the shocks go to a setting of #2. Then I will try #1. This may smooth out the rides on the bumpy roads around here. When I load up for travel I will try #3.

Thanks,
Janine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Shock Settings

Don't forget to check tire preasure this can have as much to do with ride as the shock settings. Get a good preasure gauge preferably a digital with a 90 degree angle to fit in the small area. The wife has her shocks set on #1 and she is 6Ft about 150# she has no problem with it bottoming but I have not let her ride mine with different shocks or she will want some to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
Hi Janine,

Some good advice here. I think at 125lbs you are definitely looking at #1 setting, possibly #2. #3 would be overkill.

I am 165lbs, and I always ride with a 105lbs passenger, and often with 25lbs under the seat. That's a total mass of 295lbs and I use #4 typically as I ride on tight winding roads and need a firm ride to ensure that we don't bottom out mid-bend. I sometimes use the #5 setting if I want to show some race rep guys ‘650 Magic’ but passengers find the ride harsh on this setting. #3 is fine at 295lbs for those that aren’t corner carving, and gives a ride-all-day-long comfortable ride.

With this in mind, your 125lbs and daily gear should easily be accommodated on #1. #2 should be fine for carrying luggage – even fully loaded. The owners manual states that you shouldn’t carry more than:
• 22lbs under the seat
• 15lbs in a top box
• 8lbs in the front compartments combined
So, you are still looking at only an additional 45lbs over your body weight when fully loaded. This is still less than half the weight of a small passenger, so #3 would be overkill even on long trips. In fact, it’s on those long trips when you want it set-up as softly as possible so that you are comfortable.

As advised, it’s a good idea to check those tyre pressures, too. Suzuki recommends putting more air in the rear tyre when you carry a passenger for example, so its handling is sensitive to air pressure. Watch out as the seasons change, as your tyres will lose air, and make the bike feel horrible to ride.

Best of luck.
Lycheed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,041 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
On the subject of tire pressure, do all of you use the recommended pressure listed on the metal plate on the front of the Burgman? If not, what do you use?

Also, what is the difference with the other shocks and what brand?

Janine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,323 Posts
I always run my tire pressure set for 2 up riding. It seems to extend tire life. 33 lbs in the front and 41 lbs in the rear. This is for the 650.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
I do the same as Allwalk (33/41). In addition to possibly extending tire life, the scooter handles better in windy conditions with these tire settings combined with a fairly firm shock setting. This is very important where I live.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Won't the higher pressure in the rear tyre make it square off quicker without the extra load ?

Ian :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
P.D.Q.S.B. said:
Won't the higher pressure in the rear tyre make it square off quicker without the extra load ?

Ian :D
No. The Pirelli wasn't squared off at all, even at the time I replaced it. It wore beautifully. The Bridgestone, which I did not always run at 41 psi, was flat in the middle long before the tread wore out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
611 Posts
For a 125lb rider I'd suggest lower tire pressure also. For you I don't think there is any need for more than 30/37 - and you may get a better ride even lower. Both tire pressure and shock settings will affect handling and comfort. Too much and you get a harsh ride, too little and the bike will wallow over bumps and through corners. The higher your tire pressure is the less rolling resistance you get, and your gas mileage goes up - but past a certain point your tire grip goes down because the tire isn't conforming to the road at all - it's got too much pressure for the weight that's it on it.

You might want to take some time to tune your suspension. Do it with a friend or two and watch for differences as you make changes. Start by putting the shock all of the way up. Beware that the traction may be reduced for cornering, and the rear wheel may hop over bumps. Ride it around a bit, and move the suspension down a notch. Ride it around a bit and move it down a notch... When it starts to feel like it's wallowing a bit (suspension compresses so much when cornering that it moves the bike around, or the suspension feels soggy on bumps) - then move it back up a notch.

Then do the same ride again to verify you like it - and start on the tire pressure. Fill the tires up to the max psi and ride it. Once again - beware that your tire grip may be lessened at max psi! Let about 2psi out of each tire and go for the same ride again. Let 2 more psi out again and ride... When it starts feeling sloppy then put 2 more psi back into it and ride it again. I wouldn't take the pressure below 25/28 (actually I wouldn't take it down that far) - but you should find the psi you like best before that.

Higher Tire Pressure Pro's:
Will make it more stable at higher straightline speeds.
Rolling resistance goes down, so gas mileage can go up.

Lower Tire Pressure Pro's:
Cornering grip is better.
The ride is softer.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top