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First post, but I’ve been reading the forum for awhile and gained a lot of knowledge. It’s time to start shopping for a scooter.

A little back ground. I’ve not a lot of experience on motorbikes. I started with a Yamaha 400, then to a Kawasaki 440, then a Harley Low Rider. For the past 10 years I’ve spent most of my summers in Greece on business. While there I fell in love with maxi-scooters and, when I had time, rented one often. I made sure each summer to have two days to myself to cruise around the Island of Corfu. My wife had a boyhood friend who had a car/scooter rental business and he convinced me an Aprilia Atlantic would be my best choice. He had both a 125 and 200 Atlantic and I rented them both. They had the same wheelbase as the Burgman 200 that’s coming to the states this year and I found both to have plenty of power for the roads and hills of Corfu and were very comfortable.

After doing a lot of research on the internet, it seems a Burgman will be my best choice. I’d like some input on which model.

I’m a fairly big guy at 6’ 240lbs. I’ve sat on both 400 and 650 and found them both plush and comfortable while sitting.

I’ll use the scooter for trips to town and cruises, sometimes long cruises at a gentle pace – normally under 60 mph. -- and mostly by myself. I live next to nowhere in Northern Michigan and so even the trips to town (10 mi.) will not be hectic. I always search out secondary roads while traveling and so won’t spend a lot of time on interstates.

I would like to do most of the upkeep myself, but I know my limits and will take it to a good mechanic for anything involved.

While I will probably look for gently used, new will be an option. Although I like being wise with my money, price won’t be a barrier, value however, will. (My best vehicle value to date is my Toyota Tacoma FWD that now has 290,000 mi. and purrs like a kitten, bought, new.) Also, mpg will not be a great concern, but again, I don’t like being wasteful.

I’m 64 and would like this scooter to last a long time. I have a 74 year old friend that I’ll be traveling with often. He swears by BMW’s and has just traded down to a 650cc (I think) dual purpose type BMW. I’d like to keep up with him, although he’s not a road burner either.

Would like any advice and suggestions.

Thanks in advance.

John
 

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I feel a later model 400 would suit your needs just fine.
 

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For the type riding you discribe either would work. Pick the one that excites you more.
 

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The 650 have 55 hp, the 400 have 40 hp I believe, if you calculate weight to hp ratio the 650 shine here, it much better than 400 model.

You are 240 lb and if you tour a lot you will greatly appreciate extra power of twin cylinder engine on 650 especially if carry passenger, it is so smooth and responsive.

If you mainly do short ride, commute to work, not go very far you will be well served by single cylinder 400.

650 have less vibration than 400 which is nice on longer ride.

Both excellent reliable bike.
 

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Either would work fine for you. Seating is about the same on both. Power, amenities, and smoothness goes to the 650. Economy, handling and storage to the 400. However, given you may have this bike into your 70s, you might have a preference for the lighter 400. It's just more fun to ride a lighter bike. While both excellent bikes, the 400 is more scooterish, like what you rode in Greece, but still able to deal with our American superhighways.

Personally, I'd open up to both possibilities and see what's on the used market. Get the best deal on a good used bike, no matter which one. That frame of mind doubles your possible prospects.
 

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If I had your described riding conditions I might have opted for the 400. I needed to be certain I'd have enough oomph for crowded highway high speed aggressive maneuvering, including terrible short on-ramp merges, (near Los Angeles) and comfort for longer rides with my m/c buddies. It made the 650 an easier choice for me.
 

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If I had your described riding conditions I might have opted for the 400. I needed to be certain I'd have enough oomph for crowded highway high speed aggressive maneuvering, including terrible short on-ramp merges, (near Los Angeles) and comfort for longer rides with my m/c buddies. It made the 650 an easier choice for me.
Be that as it may... I also love the 650 on freeways and long rides, of course, but...

The 400 does just fine on the crowded Los Angeles freeways and is in fact my choice for lane splitting. I've been riding it, quite aggressively, here for near eight years with no problems.

I've written here a couple times, that the 650 is the better highway bike, and the 400 the better city bike. However, the 400 is better on highways than the 650 is in the city. It's a slim distinction, but nonetheless true, IMHO.
 

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I had a 400 before I got a 650 after the 400 was totaled. I also weigh 240 +- and the 400 pulled me through the mountains great. I bought both based on price, condition and availability. The 400 is far more nimble, economical and the lighter weight is noticeable. The 650 is smoother, much faster but you feel its weight. As you describe how you are going to ride it, I think a nice used 400 would be a better choice. However, the 650s are far easier to find and are generally a better buy. I would check what is available and buy the best bike at the best price regardless of which one you choose.

If you have a short inseam like I do, the 28" seat height is far better than the 29 1/2" on the 650.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Personally, I'd open up to both possibilities and see what's on the used market. Get the best deal on a good used bike, no matter which one. That frame of mind doubles your possible prospects.
Sounds like the pros outweigh the cons on both bikes and I should just look for the best value. From reading similar threads, I suspected that would be the case.

Thanks for all the good thoughts.

John
 

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>>an Aprilia Atlantic would be my best choice. He had both a 125 and 200 Atlantic<<

I once owned a 500cc Atlantic, and it was a pretty nice scooter. However, like most Italian bikes the dealer/service network was weak, so I sold it off. Oh well....
 

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I would look for a 08 or newer 400 or a 09 or newer 650.
 

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Be that as it may... I also love the 650 on freeways and long rides, of course, but...

The 400 does just fine on the crowded Los Angeles freeways and is in fact my choice for lane splitting. I've been riding it, quite aggressively, here for near eight years with no problems.

I've written here a couple times, that the 650 is the better highway bike, and the 400 the better city bike. However, the 400 is better on highways than the 650 is in the city. It's a slim distinction, but nonetheless true, IMHO.
'The 400 is better on highways than the 650 is in the city'

+1 Liam......for those of us lucky to own both this comment is 'bang on the money' !

:D:D:D
 

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Not to change the subject, but apparently the only state where you can legally lane split is California. All other states you may be liable for an accident as it is illegal, it's also very dangerous because car drivers Are swerving too, instead of looking in the rearview mirror theyre playing with their mobile phones and other gadgets of immediate gratification.

The 400 is the john deer green of scoots, bulletproof, reliable, affordable, plenty of Everything, not a problem on interstates, I do every day!
 

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Not to change the subject, but apparently the only state where you can legally lane split is California. All other states you may be liable for an accident as it is illegal, it's also very dangerous because car drivers Are swerving too, instead of looking in the rearview mirror theyre playing with their mobile phones and other gadgets of immediate gratification.

The 400 is the john deer green of scoots, bulletproof, reliable, affordable, plenty of Everything, not a problem on interstates, I do every day!
Don't knock it till you tried it Chappy. I have Been lane splitting safely for 25 years. IMHO, on crowded freeways you're more likely to get rear ended than suffer from a swerving car, they've no place to swerve in traffic. Makes me nervous just sitting there.

And btw, the 400 is an excellent lane splitter, much better than the 650. So I agree with your John Deer comment. The best is the Honda Helix though, low to the ground, very maneuverable, thin, great lane splitter.
 

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The 400 is the john deer green of scoots,
Since I used to work on John Deeres and other colors I guess I'll never own a 400 then as hour for hour green cost more back then. If it wasn't that they had JD blankets, pillows, books, toys, etc to brainwash children from a small age they would have gone the way of Packard, Hudson, etc.
 

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'The 400 is better on highways than the 650 is in the city'

+1 Liam......for those of us lucky to own both this comment is 'bang on the money' !

:D:D:D
As with most things it is a matter of personal opinion. Personally I would rather ride my 650 in city traffic than my 400. Off hand I can't think of a riding situation where I consider the 400 to be a better choice for me than the 650.
 

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The 400 is the john deer green of scoots, bulletproof, reliable, affordable, plenty of Everything, not a problem on interstates, I do every day!
Me guessing you not ever ride a 650 for a week or two. So sorry you miss this ! :rolleyes:
 

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I went through the same decision making process last year and purchased a new 400. Even at 5000 ft elevation with two up, the 400 has been excellent, and capable of cruising at 70 mph on the interstate.
However, I normally ride solo, and my overall fuel economy on Fuelly for the first 3500 miles has been 61.0 mpg. I have taken the Burg to 11,000 ft elevations in our New Mexico mountains, with plans for 14,000 ft peaks this summer in Colorado.
I haven't seen any need to get a 650 yet. I suggest you ride them both before a final decision.
 
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