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Discussion Starter #1
The Wheel bearings for the 2002 and newer Burgman 650's are:

2 each - Front 6203-2RS
2 each - Rear 6204-2RS

Front seals:

1 each - 22 x 40 x 7 for the left side
1 each - 24 x 40 x 7 for the right side

Rear seal:

1 each - 28 x 47 x 7 for the right side
None on left side
 

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Let me add a bit to the wheel bearings and seals thread.

I just replaced the tires on my 2006 650 before heading on a fairly long trip. While I could have ridden on them for another 2K miles at best I'm heading to the Renegade Rally and wanted good rubber against the road.

I replaced the wheel bearings while the wheels were off, but in all fairness they were in good shape with lots of fresh grease in place. The original bearings are sealed on only one side and the replacements are double sealed, which I consider an improvement. I used a brand called SNR and two of the bearings were marked made in Germany, the other two were made in Great Britain. SNR was suggested by my bearing eupplier, Gopher Bearing, as being high quality. Since I've used them on previous bikes with good results I followed their recommendation.

I also put on Pirelli Diablo Scooter tires -- got a good deal on them from Tires Unlimited at <www.tiresunlimited.com>. The newest offerings are H rated, but these tires, bought last winter, are radial and S rated. Still I'm not going over 112 MPH so it's a moot point. The tires have about 7/32" of tread depth on the rear and 5/32" on the front. We'll see how long they last.

So far, I can't tell much difference, but then i'm taking it easy with new tires until the slippery coating rubs off. The ride is about the same -- I run 41-42 PSI rear and 33-34 PSI front. Handling might be a bit smoother, but that's probably due to the more rounded profile of the new tires.

They were a bear to mount and I have a manual tire changing machine bought from Harbor Freight. Still, it took two of us to get the new tires onto the rims Both front and rear tires were quite stiff walled and the key was to keep the bead as far into the center of the wheel as possible during mounting. The rear took about 40 grams to balance, the front only 20 grams. I should have tried rotating the tire to another spot, but I did mount the markings on the tire's lightest spot alongside the valve stem.

A road test shows no imbalance based vibration up to about 75 MPH so that seems to be okay. I'll report back on the life fairly soon -- I should be covering about 3K miles in the next two to three weeks.

Ray Nielsen, in Minneapolis and went for a ride today.
 

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Pirelli tire update.

I've not logged about 2000 miles on the Pirelli Diablos (S Rated). They're doing quite well as to handling and the ride quiality is very similar to the original Bridgestones.

Tire wear is right at 1/32" on both front and rear. Assuming a minimum tread depth of 2/32", the minimum legal depth here in MN, they'll be good for another 6 K miles. Not bad considering the price ($102 including S & H from <www.tiresunlimited.com>).

Would I buy them again? Probably not -- I'm hoping for better mileage between tire changes due to the work and trouble. I'll probably opt for Avon Viper Strykes next time assuming I can find some at a reasonable price.

Ray Nielsen, in Mineapolis and going for a lunch ride today.
 

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More on bearings - as I am just about to buy (even tho' I have a 2004) tyre coming up for changing so this is convenient an precautionary.

I am not familiar with the bearing designation suffixes.

Which of these is best for the Burgman:

6204 2RSH
6204 2RSHC3
6204 2RSL
6204 2RSLC3

These are from SKF with the first two variants listed as £4.68 and the latter two at £12.02
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Norman, the 2RS is want you want. It stand for 2 rubber seals, meaning both sides are sealed. I think a 3C bearing is one with extra space between the balls (no jokes now). I'm not familiar with the "H" and it may have something to do with brand. The ones I get locally are usually SKF ot ***.
 

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Forgot to say that if you are unsure which one really is best, just bring one of the old ones up to your bearing suppliers. Theses guys usually know what they are talking about and they will supply you with the proper one and make sure it has seals both sides.
 

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Steve

I have just had the H bearings delivered - :twisted:

Will these be OK to fit? Or should I reorder the L bearings?
 

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H bearings are fine for wheels as well Norman. Probably a bit overkill as they are a bit more expensive because they are designed for high RPM at long running periods, but they will last longer than standard ones.

BTW, my apologies for not answering this sooner.
 

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Steve - thanks for the reply - I thought you had gone to ground.

Well I did a bit more research found nothing conclusively against the proposition so went ahead and fitted the 'H' spec.

:D
 

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Well guys, I replaced the bearings on both the front and rear wheels tonight.

I have to admit that I am extremely disappointed at the cheap skate approach Suzuki has taken with the Burgie.In almost 40 years of riding I have never seen wheel bearings in as bad as shape as these were. Why they didn't spend the few extra cents on sealed bearings is beyond me. :roll:

My bearings were rusted out and incredibly loose. I don't how the water got in to the hubs but I can only assume the previous owner used a power washer of some sort. :evil:

My advice is for all owners to check these asap. A loose bearing is one thing but a seized one is quite another and that's what a rusted loose bearing ultimately leads to.

Come Monday I'll test the Burgie on my daily commute and see if its low speed handling during lane splitting is improved any. :)
 

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Supposedly the bearings in the model after 2003 are better quaility.
Still, I plan to inspect and probably replace mine when it's tire swap time.
 

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Wes said:
This might be a candidate for "Sticky message" since it gets asked.

The Wheel bearings for the Burgman 650 are:

Rear 6204-2RS
Front 6203-2RS

Front seals:

1 22 x 40 x 7 for the left side
1 24 x 40 x 7 for the right side

Rear seal:

1 28 x 47 x 7 for the right side
Can these double sealed bearings be found at the dealer or is there an aftermarket company to order them from?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Groovin' said:
Can these double sealed bearings be found at the dealer or is there an aftermarket company to order them from?
I very much doubt that the dealer will have them. They are available from any bearing supply house. I get mine from Kaman Industries. Check you yellow pages.
 

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I have a 2003 Burgman 650 with approx. 12000 km (a little over 7000 miles) on the odometer. The bike is in good condition and has essentially only been used in dry weather. I was not planning on replacing the bearings until I need new tires. Do the bearings wear out due to mileage or is time also a facor. I have not seen anyone explain when to replace the bearings - i.e. anything to be concerned if the bike has low mileage and no problems yet ? Thanks.
 

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There is no maintenance for the bearings in the service schedule, at least for the 650. The 2003's had a problem with early bearing failure, but Suzuki seems to have solved that.

I'd say that mileage would be more of a factor for wear than time. Due to the cost of labor, to me it makes the most sense to have the bearings inspected and/or replaced whenever the tires get replaced- since the wheels are already off the bike, the incremental cost of bearing labor should be pretty small. And a bargain compared to the cost and inconvenience of a failed bearing in the middle of nowhere USA.
 

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Just came back from a 4 day 1500 mile ride with a group through our mountains and twisty country. Day 1 and 2 I did a fair bit of offroading - hard packed mud, loose gravel, corrugations and a whole lot of other variations. Day 3 I start to hear a strange clunk from the front end and the front feels "strange". I'm still pushing the bike very hard through the twisties though and the side stand is grounding regularly (I still can't believe how nimble the Burgie is through tight fast twisties (nor can most of the other riders who are being embarrassed whilst riding significantly more powerful and sophisticated steeds). Last night I did a check of the front end and all seemed fine, but I knew something was awrie as the handling seemed to fall away on occasion and I could easily promote speed wobbles just by removing my hands from the bars. Finally 60km from home tonight the noises get progressively louder and clunkier and I realise the right front wheel bearing has collapsed. I nursed the old girl home and pulled the wheel off immediately. All the balls had come out, many were oval and the remains of the casing were not a pretty sight. I'm off to buy another set in the morning but I don't understand why the bearing went so quickly - only 4 months and 7,000km? :? I can only assume the offroading must have allowed some dust to get in - either that or the bearings were duds from new.

This doesn't bode well for my China-Mongolia-Siberia trip on the Burgie which I am starting in 3 months. :(

Very disappointing
 

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Garry: Didn't the 03' 650 have bearing seals issues originally? I thought that this problem had been resolved by installing sealed bearings. Or am I mistaking.

You must mean that you were scraping the "center stand". Wow, that's gonna be one heck of a trip "China-Mongolia-Siberia". How much distance are you planning to cover and in how much time? Are you going on your own or will you have riding partners?

Have fun and be safe
 
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