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Discussion Starter #1
What does this wear pattern mean? Shinko. Less than a year old. My guess is 4000-6000 miles. Has unfortunately seen some gravel roads. Any idea why it wore so quickly and only on the sides?
90556
 

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Shinkos tend to like high pressures which might not be a good fit for a particular bike If they aren’t standard fitment.

The centre tread of the cap is likely to be a harder wearing compound tha5 the high grip compound used toward the shoulders. Once you wear through past where the wear marker level is you break through to a compound that is structural and not meant to touch the road so it can wear faster - exaggerating the difference between worn and less worn areas.

Lots of gravel may also be allowing the outer edges to make more in straight running than expected on a harder surface (I’ve never done that to a Shinko) and turning the wheel more due to low speed.
 

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DAAANG!!!
 

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I've seem worse but usually it is the rear and the cords show in the center. I found this:



My front tire often wears more on the left side than the right. Is this an indication of a problem with my bike?
Not necessarily. It’s actually a common phenomenon for the left side of the tire to wear a little bit more than the right side.
There have been several reasons put forth as to why this occurs. Here are a few of the more common ones:
  • It depends on personal riding habits, motorcycle balance and the roads frequently traveled.
  • The existence of road crowns, allowing rainwater to drain from the center of the road to the sides, causing wear on the left side of the tires since you ride on the right side of the road.
  • At intersections, left-hand turns are literally longer than right hand turns because of the necessity of positioning yourself in the rightmost lane of the road you’re entering, as demonstrated in the simple diagram below. This means that you literally ride a greater distance on the left side than the ride side of your tires.
Diagram Showing the Long Turning Required from Left-hand Turns Compared to Right-hand Turns
The latter two suggestions in particular have gained a number of adherents because motorcyclists in countries which require driving on the left side of the road typically wear out the right side of their tires instead of the left side.
While it isn’t necessarily an indication of a problem, you might want to have your tire checked by a professional to see what their recommendation is if you find yourself wearing the left side faster than the right. It’s always better to have an expert provide their opinion before dismissing an issue.
 
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Just to make a change to Uncle Festers post above for Right hand drive Countries compaired to Left hand Drivers.

Left hand drivers like most of Europe and USA
intersection-turning 1.png

Right Hand drivers like GB, Japan and lots of other countries.

Intersection-turning Right hand.png
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'm surprised you let it go that far. 'Specially since it sticks out right in front of your sight. Guardian angel must be on time and a half.
i check fairly regularly. This tire went south quuuuuiiiiicck.

I ordered a Michelin City Grip as I wanted a higher end replacement. Now that it’s shipped I read that there can be problems in mixing belts and radials. My rear tire is a Shinko. Am I in trouble?
 

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someone on here said mc tires are like toilet paper , once you get near the end they go really fast! road surfaces can make a big difference in tire life, concrete or (worst I've ever seen ) coral are much more abrasive than asphalt , and hot asphalt is worse than cool, so a lot depends on conditions. Under moderate drijving conditions, (you aren't trying to break world leaning and accelerating records) your tire mix won't be dangerous, maybe not the absolute best , but good enough for daily use . Darksiding is a mix no one recommends, but it's a mix that works for conservative riders.
 

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I currently have a mix... Shinko bias on the rear and Bridgestone radial on the front. I didn't plan it that way but I had Bridgestones both ends and the rear wore out. I bought both Shinko tires (F/R) but the front just hasn't worn out yet. It's close though. If you mix it is better to put the radial on the rear and bias on front. I do notice just a little bit of uncertainty with my current setup but only when I am pushing aggressively through a tight curve... and lately I've been wondering if that wasn't just the road surface I was on since it really doesn't happen all that much. I'm usually a very conservative rider so it is very manageable and I have no worries about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
As far as I can tell both the Michelin City Grip and Shinko are Bias Ply, so I should be good. Websites should make that spec more prominent, or even present at times.

I use the Scenic App to generate a lot of routes. It has a setting to "avoid unpaved" but here in the Ozarks there is A LOT of gravel roads their database is unaware of. I used to carefully navigate the gravel stretches with the (usually correct) hope that it is just a few hundred yards to pavement, but lately there have been gravel/rock stretches that were a few miles. I wonder if that could be responsible for the premature wear. I have since sworn off unpaved roads (unless someone makes a knobby for this size. Do they? I should look into that).
 
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