Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,167 Posts
hi speed or hi temp,? sometinmes where it is used make s a difference
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,886 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I need good grease for the steering bearings and for the CVT which will be Hi temp Hi speed. Wouldn't the Hi speed High Temp be good for both applications?
 

·
I'm Retired
Joined
·
9,364 Posts
No one can ever accuse me of throwing away anything with any potential use. :oops:

I really hesitate to admit this, but I have a tub of "Disc & Drum Brake, High Temperature Wheel Bearing Grease" by LubriMatic bought from KMart for $1.06 about 30 years ago. :roll: It seems to work fine for what I have used it for.

Someone will probably tell me now that it expires after so many years, or the new stuff is far better and only a fool would be using it. :blackeye:

Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Don't use high temp grease in low temp applications like steering bearings where there's no heat and no load.. Use a multi-purpose white or yellow lithium complex NLGI #1 grease.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,933 Posts
Daboo said:
Someone will probably tell me now that it expires after so many years, or the new stuff is far better and only a fool would be using it. :blackeye:

Chris
It doesn't expire but will absorb moisture if not sealed well.....and it's not like you live in a damp climate or anything. :blackeye:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,389 Posts
Daboo said:
No one can ever accuse me of throwing away anything with any potential use. CHEAPSKATE):oops:

I really hesitate to admit this, but I have a tub of "Disc & Drum Brake, High Temperature Wheel Bearing Grease" by LubriMatic bought from KMart for $1.06 about 30 years ago. :roll: It seems to work fine for what I have used it for.

Someone will probably tell me now that it expires after so many years, or the new stuff is far better and only a fool would be using it. :blackeye:

Chris
Chris, after 5 years it looses some of its body. Fried eggs don't taste as good with old grease. :D

Its true that you should not use High Temp grease in a low temp application as it will not melt and flow around the ball bearings as well. But the steering head bearings should be ok with a good moly type grease.
 

·
I'm Retired
Joined
·
9,364 Posts
Dave_J said:
...Chris, after 5 years it looses some of its body. Fried eggs don't taste as good with old grease. :D ...
I figure that if Crisco and Twinkies can last 20 years on the shelf, my grease can too.

Chris
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,389 Posts
Daboo said:
Dave_J said:
...Chris, after 5 years it looses some of its body. Fried eggs don't taste as good with old grease. :D ...
I figure that if Crisco and Twinkies can last 20 years on the shelf, my grease can too.

Chris
Chris, when the good Lord has taken us from this place, 10,000 years later a package of Twinkies will be still waiting on a shelf for someone to open it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Dave_J said:
Its true that you should not use High Temp grease in a low temp application as it will not melt and flow around the ball bearings as well. But the steering head bearings should be ok with a good moly type grease.
Moly powder was developed into a lubricant for aerospace applications where a viscous lube would turn to a solid at low temperatures. It was added to other greases by enterprising manufacturers as a marketing gimmick to take advantage of the aerospace connection. Most "moly grease" contains only 2%-3% moly powder by volume and the film thickness of the carrier usually prevents the moly from doing anything useful; the moly just colors the grease. Greases containing 30% 70 60% moly by volume are available for use in firearms and aiviation applications where the grease is applied in a thin film and then rubbed to remove all excess lube leaving a virtually invisible and almost-dry film that must be renewed regularly. Moly added to greases intended to lubricate sliding couplings/interfaces will do no harm but moly grease shouldn't be used in either Timken or ball-type bearings. The moly can accumulate on the races.

A simple lithium complex or light all-purpose grease is quite enough on the steering head. If you really can't live with the idea that run-of-the-mill grease will work for your steering head bearings, buy a tube of Tri-Flow synthetic grease at your local hardware store... or I can recommend a great general purpose synthetic grease that will work fabulously from -40 deg. F to +400 deg. F and will only cost you $30/oz. :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
My previous post contains some typos. Specifically, the sentence that begins with
"Greases containing 30% 70 60% moly by volume are available for use in firearms and aiviation..."
should read
"Greases containing 30% to 60% moly by volume are available for use in firearms and aviation..."
I apologize for not checking my submission more closely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
280 Posts
LeDude said:


this is what I use for seating my bearings and general use

for very high temp uses, use Honda moly paste 60

A great grease that is also used for marine use as it is not affected by salt water. I have used it for many years and never had a bearing failure any any vehicle that i used it on and will use it on my Burgman when I have to work on a particular part in the future as now i only have done 6,000klm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
O.K., I learned something today. The 'chrome moly grease' that is for the wheel bearings etc. does not contain enough moly to protect and is a marketing thing. But, can I still use it on the bearings in the clutch and a thin film on the CVT spacer? Or should I try and find some traditional 'long fiber' whee bearing grease?

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I can only offer a personal preference on the use of these low-percentage moly greases. I don't use them. Moly powder adds to the cost of manufacturing the grease and that cost can be recovered by skimping on the quality of the grease used to compound the stuff. I once used some moly grease in sliding spline couplings and 4 months later found that the grease had disappeared and all that was left were a few little cakes of moly and a lot of metal dust.

I don't think the old sticky bearing grease is necessary either; I also don't think you'll find it. It's mostly oil in a carrier and the heat from the bearings causes the carrier to break down and release the oil which does the lubricating. Then the whole mass turns solid again when it cools.

The modern wheel bearing grease sold at auto parts stores will be fine.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top