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Looks like a nice clean installation, nice job!
 

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Looks great. I have a Kuryakn LED volt meter "temporarily" installed up near my instrument cluster but would be interested in finding out more about what model of voltmeter you purchased and how you mounted it to the handle bar assembly.
 

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Thanks for sharing your idea as we all know "real estate" is tight on our bikes. What voltmeter did you use? Thanks Mark
 

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theres lots of brands out there, Mine reads Volts as well as Charging Voltages, There are some smart ones out there that can do even more if you spend good money.

Inova makes good one's as well, which has Leds and Digital Number Displays,Even blinks when Power is low!!
 

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I use an LED which changes colour depending on the voltage generated. alternating GREEN/RED = >15.2volts (overvoltage), GREEN (charging) = >13.2, AMBER = >12.45, RED slow flashing = >12.25, RED two flashes repeated = >12.00, RED three flashes repeated = >11.8, RED four flashes repeated = > 0 volts. In practice I simply look for the green and then know that all is well.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Voltmeter install instructions

Here it is in a nutshell. I will include pictures by this weekend but, it is not very hard. Just take your time.

You will need a voltmeter, a way to make the hole for the meter in the handlebar cover, clear packing tape, epoxy putty (black colored), electrical connector of some sort (so you can disconnect the meter the next time you must remove the handlebar cover), some extra wire and some sort of connecters, taps, whatever you like to connect the wires to a good voltage source. (I used the extra power connector for the grip heaters located under and forward of the instrument cluster.)

Here is a link to the voltmeter I used. voltmeter

First, remove all the plastic from the handlebars.
Place the voltmeter where you would like it against the face of the surface you are planning on mounting it to and draw an outline with a wax or carbon pencil. (You could also make a template with construction paper or thin cardboard.)

Cut the space out. I used a Dremel tool. You could use a drill and file, coping saw, Rotozip, whatever you like to get a smooth, square hole. (deburr and smooth the edges. Do not bevel the edges, make them square.)

Make sure the meter fits in the hole. If you take out too much on a corner or one side, all is not lost. We will address this during the finishing phase.

Cover the outside of the hole with tape. I have found clear, wide packing tape works best as you can see through it. You might want to use two layers and make sure the hole is well covered all around. (several inches or more at least, around the hole.)

From the inside, position the meter to the center of your hole and stick it to the tape. Make sure the meter is flush with the outside surface.

All of the next steps are done from the inside of the cover with the meter stuck in place to the tape.

Mix up some black epoxy. Apply with a tooth pick a thin layer all around the meter to fill in the gap around the outside edge and to act as a bezel. (You can see through the clear tape any air bubbles or places you have missed. The area MUST be filled in completely for a finished look and a water tight seal. This step will fill in any excess space you have around the face of the meter.)
CAUTION: Do not force epoxy around the meter in such a way in which it will cover the face of the meter. Take your time.

Let the Epoxy set up. (I let it set overnight but, several hours should be fine.)

Mix up more epoxy and apply a thick coating around and on top of the meter. I did around 1/2" around the meter, let it set up until tacky, and then ran another thick layer around and over the top of the meter to water proof it.
Pay particular attention to the wires. Seal them with epoxy so no water can enter.

OPTIONAL: Run the wire down to the center of the cover and glue it in place with left over epoxy.

Let dry.

The meter comes with plenty of wire attached to it. I cut it so my connector goes by the triple tree. I wired the meter so my power source is also my sensor voltage. (Wire the white and red wires together.)

Use a switched source for your power.
Good Sources: The wires going to the power socket in the glove box, the main power wire going to the fuse box, the aux. power plug for the heated grips. For the true die-hards who must have the most accurate voltage sourced from the alternator, run the wires all the way to the battery and connect there.

I used the heated grip connector first. I switched the source to my power distribution block when I installed it. I then switched it back to the aux. heated grip connector so I now read the voltage after it passes through the key switch in order to know the voltage for the front power distribution system. This helps me find power problems when I am troubleshooting.
It is up to you.

Plug in your meter, place the covers back on the handlebars, remove the tape and viola!

NOTE: If you cannot find black epoxy putty, you may use clear. It will look a little strange but, it will work. Another thing you can do is use the fillings from making the hole in the cover and also, grind down some of your scrap from the hole into a fine powder, mix it into clear epoxy to color match and use this mix on the first layer around the face of the meter to color match the cover and make a bezel. (Old timers trick.) :)
 

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I use an LED which changes colour depending on the voltage generated. alternating GREEN/RED = >15.2volts (overvoltage), GREEN (charging) = >13.2, AMBER = >12.45, RED slow flashing = >12.25, RED two flashes repeated = >12.00, RED three flashes repeated = >11.8, RED four flashes repeated = > 0 volts. In practice I simply look for the green and then know that all is well.
Method: (1) Drill a 10mm hole below speedo or wherever you want the LED (2) Fit the LED in the hole with a spot of plastic cement. (3) connect live lead to accessory socket and the other to nearest Earth. That's it!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Method: (1) Drill a 10mm hole below speedo or wherever you want the LED (2) Fit the LED in the hole with a spot of plastic cement. (3) connect live lead to accessory socket and the other to nearest Earth. That's it!
Ahh Peelbro, my poor lad.
With your system, you don't know what the voltage is. You just have a general idea. This is fine if you want to know something has gone wrong.

Being an electronics technician and an EE, I must know the voltage! My type is anal that way don-cha-now. :) This way, I have an idea something is about to go wrong. (Not that I can do a thing about it most times but, at least I know about it dag nab it!) :confused::rolleyes:

Believe me, I looked hard at your very nice and clean installation. I like the looks and the simplicity of the install. But I know me. It would slowly drive me crazy, (OK, OK, crazier!), if I did not know the actual voltage. Watching it rise and drop with RPMs and current usage when the brakes go on or the blinkers are running, grips are on or the heaters cycling off and on on my gear, etc.

"The Modern EE. Creating complex solutions to simple problems."
 

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Had to Admit these are Not Perfect!! Because of System Usage, So The Power Read is not very Accurate to the Letter when you have All the Systems Draining the 12v Current, Have not found a way around this when Ignition systems are Online But when OFF your getting a Accurate reading, When it's just reading just the Battery it self..

There are some Awesome ones out there that about as big as a Pack of Zig Zags.

Elliott,
 

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Method: (1) Drill a 10mm hole below speedo or wherever you want the LED (2) Fit the LED in the hole with a spot of plastic cement. (3) connect live lead to accessory socket and the other to nearest Earth. That's it!
What a super ergonomic solution.:)
 

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Ahh Peelbro, my poor lad.
With your system, you don't know what the voltage is. You just have a general idea. This is fine if you want to know something has gone wrong.

Being an electronics technician and an EE, I must know the voltage! My type is anal that way don-cha-now. :) This way, I have an idea something is about to go wrong. (Not that I can do a thing about it most times but, at least I know about it dag nab it!) :confused::rolleyes:

Believe me, I looked hard at your very nice and clean installation. I like the looks and the simplicity of the install. But I know me. It would slowly drive me crazy, (OK, OK, crazier!), if I did not know the actual voltage. Watching it rise and drop with RPMs and current usage when the brakes go on or the blinkers are running, grips are on or the heaters cycling off and on on my gear, etc.

"The Modern EE. Creating complex solutions to simple problems."
An indicating voltmeter is not necessary, nor is cutting a huge hole in the bar cover. No production vehicle has a VM (nor ammeter.) The red/green LED is sufficient, and in my case it has the additional advantage of reflecting off the top of the screen so that it is always in my field of vision. BTW I too have electronic qualifications and worked right through the electronic valve, transistor and integrated circuit era including PLC's. I have been 'in' electronics ever since my mother bought me an electric motor to replace the wind-up motor in my size 5 Meccano set when I was 10 some 66 years ago.

Still, good luck with your VM (but please try to keep your eyes on the road ahead 'cos I may be in front of you some day!) :p Ken
 

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What a super ergonomic solution.:)
It certainly is! (And I haven't forgotten that I got the idea for the central position from you after I (stupidly) fitted it next to the ignition switch). ;)
 

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Ahh Peelbro, my poor lad.
With your system, you don't know what the voltage is. You just have a general idea. This is fine if you want to know something has gone wrong.

Being an electronics technician and an EE, I must know the voltage! My type is anal that way don-cha-now. :) This way, I have an idea something is about to go wrong. (Not that I can do a thing about it most times but, at least I know about it dag nab it!) :confused::rolleyes:

Believe me, I looked hard at your very nice and clean installation. I like the looks and the simplicity of the install. But I know me. It would slowly drive me crazy, (OK, OK, crazier!), if I did not know the actual voltage. Watching it rise and drop with RPMs and current usage when the brakes go on or the blinkers are running, grips are on or the heaters cycling off and on on my gear, etc.

"The Modern EE. Creating complex solutions to simple problems."
So where are you firing your engine oil pressure gauge, air inlet manifold pressure etc?;)
 

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So where are you firing your engine oil pressure gauge, air inlet manifold pressure etc?;)
Don't forget Turbo Boost Pressure!
 

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So where are you firing your engine oil pressure gauge, air inlet manifold pressure etc?;)
A vacuum gauge would be nice for watching fuel economy.
 
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