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Discussion Starter #1
I had another thread about cleaning the whole CVT mechanism, with less-than satisfactory results.
The bike feels like, once the clutch is engaged, the front pulley is closing too soon. As if the stock rollers are TOO free to move.
So it is "shifting" too soon, the revs are too low, it sort of chugs along until 3000 RPM then all is well.

I am thinking that LIGHTER rollers would help, would have less mass therefore less force, would "shift" later, make the bike more pleasant to ride.

Any comments?

I like the 70 mpg I get on the highway :) but I sure don't like the 15-25 mph range. Thanks
 

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I would disassemble the variator and make 100% sure the rollers are all in their slots as they should be. If the ramp plate and movable face are not held reasonably close together during assembly it is possible for one or more rollers to fall out of their slots and lodge in sideways between the ramp plate and the movable pulley. If this happens the drive pulley faces would not be able to spread fully--this could cause what you describe.

This may not be the problem, but it's simple enough to open it up and see.

As to roller weight, I have been very pleased with the 18g DRP sliders...
 

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mike1nw said:
...So it is "shifting" too soon, the revs are too low, it sort of chugs along until 3000 RPM then all is well...
It sounds like you're trying to make the bike run like a big cruiser. With the engine size some of them have, all you need to do is idle away from the stop. The 400 needs revs...like about 4000 rpms...to perform well.

Sure, the clutch begins to engage at @2500-2800 rpms, but that doesn't mean you're not slipping the clutch pads an inordinate amount.

The 400 clutch (and variator) work by centrifugal force. Few rpms = little centrifugal force. Blip the throttle slightly and you'll be up to 4000 rpms. (Don't worry, the 400 won't rocket away.) Lots of rpms = lots of centrifugal force. The clutch pads will engage quickly (and not overheat and glaze!). Once the bike begins moving, adjust the throttle for more or less depending on the speed you want. The clutch pads, once engaged, will stay that way till the rpms drop enough.


Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #5
since I cleaned out the variator, the bike exhibits unpleasant operation.
I DON'T want it to chug away from a stop.
You can't rev to 4000 from a stop. It reaches 3000, the clutch catches, then it bogs down to 2000 range and chugs away. Again, feels like it's "shifting" too soon.
I will recheck my work.
It runs fine above 35 mph. (Can hit 70 mpg if I'm careful). :)

Am thinking of trying lighter rollers anyway. I see 18g as the ones most likely.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I cleaned belt dust out of everything. Didn't disassemble the clutch, just cleaned the clutch "bell".
I think I will pull it apart again.
Thanks. Will post my findings.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A big THANK YOU to cliffyk- Opened up the case, sure enough a roller was not where it was supposed to be :oops:
All is well, it runs like a dream again!
Am thinking of leaving the stock rollers in there.
Ahhhhh life is good :)
 
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