Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I had them checked on my 400 when I had just got it and they were just fine. Do I really need to worry about that? Should I have it done once and then not worry about it? Idk what do do about it. I'd do it myself but it looks a lot more involved than the 400.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
The valve adjustment issue is complicated. Generally most valves require no or little adjustment through their life cycle. If you should however have a valve that is out of adjustment it can harm your motor. The checks are essentially a precautionary measure to ensure you aren't going to ruin your motor. That being said, many cars and bikes never get a valve adjustment and are just fine for hundreds of thousands of miles. I'd be more concerned if it were a higher revving engine. It comes down to if you feel lucky or not.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,257 Posts
On the half dozen 650s I've done valve checks or assisted others in doing valve checks on I've found that the valve clearance tends to close up with time. That is especially true with the exhaust valves. The point where they reached minimum spec and needed adjustment varied from about 45,000 miles to about 70,000 miles. If the clearance closes up to much you run the risk of the valve not closing completely. That can lead to a burnt valve.

Just a couple of months ago I helped a friend check the valve clearance on her 650 which had just over 45,000 miles on it. All the intake valves were just fine with the clearance being in the middle of the spec range. All the exhaust valves were at or just below minimum spec. We pulled the exhaust cam and reset the clearance up close to the maximum spec.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,257 Posts
BTW, other than needing to pull the radiator to get the needed clearance to get the valve cover off, doing the valve clearance check is no more difficult than it is on the 400. In some ways it is easier because once you get the bodywork and radiator out of the way you have less engine stuff to take off.

The actual clearance check procedure is pretty much the same. You align the timing marks to set the #1 cylinder to TDC then insert the feeler gauges. Of course then you have to turn the engine 360 degrees and check the clearance on a second cylinder which you don't have to do on a 400.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Now how about cylinder balancing? At least that's what I think it's called. Saw that on here. Do I really need to do it? Will it help that much?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,257 Posts
I think you may be referring to throttle valve synchronization. Most folks don't bother with it. It can make your bike run a little smoother, especially if your throttle bodies are way out of sync. You need some special tools to do it yourself which you probably don't have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
What special tools do I need? How much would a shop charge to do it? And how often? It looks like I should get the valves done to be sure they're in check and then just leave them alone.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,257 Posts
Your need a vacuum balancer gauge. The manual also calls for hooking up a remote tack but you could probably get by with the bikes tack. I had mine done once but I don't remember what it cost as it's been a number of years ago. If I were to do it again I would probably buy the gauge and do it myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Just asked one mechanic and he said it would be 300 to do it depending on time. How hard is it to do? I'm a bit scared to do the valves and the vacuum balancing myself. I'm sure I could do it I just don't want to mess anything up. And does one need to be done before the other? In my mind I think the valves need to be done first to be sure everything is coming in and out fine then see how much each one is pulling and pushing after. Right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
Just asked one mechanic and he said it would be 300 to do it depending on time. How hard is it to do? I'm a bit scared to do the valves and the vacuum balancing myself. I'm sure I could do it I just don't want to mess anything up. And does one need to be done before the other? In my mind I think the valves need to be done first to be sure everything is coming in and out fine then see how much each one is pulling and pushing after. Right?
It's not hard as long as you can follow directions out of a service manual, have the right tools and a decent workspace. You especially need some space where you can lay out parts and fasteners as you work. It's helpful to have someone who's done it before to show you how much drag you should feel on the feeler gauge when you're checking a valve, so you can tell whether a valve is in spec or not. But you can teach yourself if you're patient and detail oriented enough.

A good compromise would be to check the valves yourself, and if you find one or two that need adjustment, or that you're not sure about, then button everything back up and take it to a reputable mechanic.

Locally, an experience racer showed a bunch of us how to set the valves on an SV650 track bike that he had. So we got to use feeler gauges, see how valve shims are measure, and get a sense of how the cams go back in. I knew about measuring valves, but not about counting rivets on the timing chain to get the cams back in the proper position.

One idea would be to find someone locally who's experience and could teach you about a shim-under-bucket valve set-up. Or host a local tech day and, for the cost of some brats & refreshments, have an experienced mechanic show the group how it's done.

Vacuum balancing isn't too difficult, and you can build your own balancer with some basic tubing and automatic transmission fluid. If you Google 'DIY Throttle Body Sync Tool' there are several websites that will show you how.

I taught myself on old screw and locknut valves (Kawi Concours 1000 & BMW R1100RT), so if I biffed it was an easy fix. And both bikes were pretty tolerant of ham-fisted amateurs.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top