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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Saw them in west TN a couple years ago .... Now they have made it this far east:-( Another road hazard for us two wheelers. This one was DOA. Somebody tell me the travel habits of these critters.... They travel at night mostly??
 

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That looks like a nine-banded armadillo, are found in Central America and has also reached the United States, primarily in the south-central states (notably Texas), but with a range that extends as far east as South Carolina and Florida, and as far north as Nebraska and central Indiana.Their range has consistently expanded in North America over the last century due to a lack of natural predators. (Wikipedia)

bad news its mainly a nightly one with poor vision, however it can still wander around during the day.
 

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In the State's, they started a northern migration from south Texas, about 50 years ago. Every year they are further north. We have tons of them in SW Missouri.

They are famous for their ability to dig and ruin gardens, lawns and farmland. They also supposedly can carry the Leprosy disease.

We shoot them on sight and if hit right they open up like a clam on the half shell or an oyster. Buzzard's love them with a little Tabasco.:D

They are normally nocturnal and move around very slowly.

Sam:)
 

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Ours ain't coming from Texas that's for sure! Our SE armadillos can be blamed on Tarzan and not Central America. Johnny Weissmuller's Zoo in Florida released 100's back in the day unintentionally after it closed and fell into disrepair.
I've been watching them migrate up from Florida for the past several years.
They crossed the Tennessee border 2 years ago from my observations.
Ya gotta love natures little speed bumps.

The advancement of American settlers and farming practices also allowed the armadillos to invade the United States. Colonization of other states was helped by the deliberate or accidental release of captive animals. The Florida armadillo population, for example, was the result of a few animals released from a small zoo in 1924, combined with several more that escaped from a traveling circus in 1936. Movement of cattle from Texas to other states by railway also helped the armadillo. There are several reports stating that stowaway armadillos were fairly common in cattle cars. The armadillos would often escape when the cars were unloaded. The regular production of identical quadruplets, as well as the ability to delay implantation of fertilized eggs for 14 months or more give the nine-banded armadillo a high reproductive rate. Life spans of up to twenty years, coupled with the reproductive success of the animals, means that it only takes a small number of armadillos to successfully establish stable populations in new areas.
 

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They have been around here in Texas for as long as I can remember. You don't see them on the roads during the day very often. They will get out on the road at night time. Usually they are not that hard to steer around.

They do have a strange habit when frightened. They jump straight up in the air 3 or 4 feet. Many you see dead on the road were not run over. The driver straddled them but when the vehicle went over they jumped straight up into the underside of the moving vehicle.
 

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We have these, they have no predators except moving vehicles,
these two are eating cat chow but they eat slugs so we encourage them.


 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, I'm glad they travel mostly at night .... cause I don't.

Around here they're being called "opossum on the half shell" ........ likely not original?

Over the years, my travels in the southwest and deep south, the ones I've seen - 9/10 were roadkill. Rarely saw a live one .... which is ok with me.

So, how do you cook'em?:D

Thanks, Sirkitrider
 

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I just moved to Texas from Indiana and have been warned about late night riding on backroads.....wouldn't want to hit one of those suckers on my 400.
 

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It's not armadillos I worry about hitting at night, it's deer and while pigs.
 

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+1 Armadillos are nothing, but I've seen a pig tear the undercarriage out from under a rock-hauler. Pigs are low-slung and heavy and to make it worse, they're often dark-furred. Pigs are worst at dawn and dusk around here.
 

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Here in Texas we have a huge problem with these unwanted immigrants.
Drinking and driving has become an even bigger issue.

 
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