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Discussion Starter #1
What is the smallest turning radius that can be done with the 650 without putting your foot down. Is it more or less then a typical motorcycle?
 

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Not sure what you mean by 'typical motorcycle'. Turning radius is dependent on the rider's skill more than the motorcycle - but some motorcycles are more prone to using lots of room to turn a 180. The tightest turn will be at or near the steerings bump-stop limit - leaving a little room for adjustments to balance is crucial. As is not using the front brake during slow hard turns.
 

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I can turn my 650 Exec. around in the street in front of my house without difficulty. Takes the entire width of my residential street though.

Namaste'
Doug in Kentucky
 

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You can practice very nicely in an empty parking lot where the spaces are perpendicular, not angled.
Center yourself in one space and make a 180 into the SECOND space over.
USE THE REAR BRAKE LIGHTLY to help stability
With a bit of practice, you should eventually be able to do a 180 from the very edge of the starting space to the far edge on the NEXT space, about 16 feet.
 

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There is actually a formula used to determine the turning radius of a motorcycle. I can't remember what that formula is off the top of my head, but, the average is about 19 feet. That, of course, is under optimum circumstances. I've seen "riders" that couldn't turn their bikes around in 30 feet!

An old motorcyclist told me once that the mark of a real motorcyclist is the ability to ride slowly and make a u-turn on a country two lane road. That, and the desire to be able to manuever around idiots that pull out of front of me or change their minds about turning off the road (or any number of other dangerous situations), keeps me practicing an Iron Cross at least once a month. I can do a tight u-turn with my wife on pillion in about 13 feet.

The Burgman 650 is not the easiest bike with which to do u-turn. The mechanics make it somewhat easier than a conventional motorcycle, no clutch to "feather", just keep the RPM's up and use the rear brake to control your speed. But, the physical configuration makes it a little more difficult, that is my humble opinion based on 44 years of riding all different types of motorcycles.

I would recommend everyone work on doing u-turns and slow speed riding. The most important thing to remember is to ALWAYS KEEP YOUR HEAD AND EYES TURNED IN THE DIRECTION YOU WANT THE BIKE TO GO!

It's just cool to be riding and pass something interesting along the road you want to pull into, and being able to just pull a u-turn (providing it can be done safely). It's even better when there's other riders already there.

Ride safely, but have fun!!!!

PopPop
 

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Yep, my street is about 16 feet across. As I have already stated, I can do a U-turn in this street but I am going to go to a parking lot (or our local MSF course) and practice to see if I can get it tighter. I do a U-turn in about 3/4 of my street width on my V-Strom. I would like to get it down to that on the Burgman. Without a clutch, I am finding that I need to go practice slow speed stuff (if it ever stops raining here).

Namaste'
Doug in Kentucky
 

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A 'U' turn is part of the motorcycle test in the UK. Put your foot down and you fail. You get one chance!
Same here in Ohio, USA. There is a smaller U turn for bikes under 650 cc and then approx 3 ft larger for 650cc and over bikes. I like to go to the test site in the evenings alone and I can do the smaller then 650cc U turns with my 650. Not hard at all.
 

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Same here in Ohio, USA. There is a smaller U turn for bikes under 650 cc and then approx 3 ft larger for 650cc and over bikes. I like to go to the test site in the evenings alone and I can do the smaller then 650cc U turns with my 650. Not hard at all.
Not sure about here in Kentucky. My son passed his ridden portion of the riders test here by completing the Basic MSF course. I have had a motorcycle license since I arrived in California in 1970 when I found they didn't recognize my Missouri Drivers license or my motorcycle endorsement on that license either. When I moved to Hawaii, I had to retake it there too, they didn't recognize any other state's motorcycle test too. Never had to take it again as every state I have lived in since accepted and transferred my motorcycle endorsement without requiring any thing but a license fee.

Kind of strange not knowing what the ridden test is in my state. I have rode by while they were giving it to others. Kentucky's ridden test looked pretty simple to me.

Namaste'
Doug
 

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Is this for a motorcycle license test...........OR........are you just plain ol curious?:sign2:
 

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I find completing U-turns on the AN650K3 and K7 to be pretty simple... and much easier to undertake than on my Dragstar 1100 or CF650TR, the latter of which doesn't have quite the same turning radius as the Burgman 650. The Dragstar has a pretty low CoG much like the Burgman, though the Burgman with the auto CVT has the edge in my experience. I pride myself on just being able to ride fast (or put another way - suitable to the road/trail conditions), but being able to ride extremely slowly and completing tight U turns, all while maintaining balance (no use of feet). By applying all my advanced driver training (ex-fire and ex-ambulance).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Is this for a motorcycle license test...........OR........are you just plain ol curious?:sign2:
I'm just plain ol curious. After reading all the reply's I guess I will have to practice more.
 

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I suggest to anyone who has trouble turning around in a tight place that they either buy the videos or take the "Ride Like a Pro" training course offered by Jerry Palidino a retired motor officer.
Then you need to practice every time you ride.

I took the training when i lived in FL and it paid off on the first trip we took afterwards. One of the folks in the training class said that his bike would not turn inside the figure 8 , that it was impossible. Jerry asked if he could try , the guy that owned the bike was a bit embarrassed when Jerry did it in both directions right and left.

Several of us took a trip up through FL and in to GA. one evening we were out just putting about before dinner. The road were were on went from paved to gravel and got very narrow with steep ditches on either side. The leader decided we should turn around, no problem.
My wife and i on the bike , feet up on the pegs , executed a perfect U turn in one try ( thanks to the training and practice) the entire rest of the group had to dismount passengers and do several attempts at turning around before we got all sorted.
I could hear my wife chuckling in her helmet as we watched what looked like a keystone cops movie.

Am i perfect at it every time ? in a word , NO, all that does it remind me to practice.
I see no reason the Burgman cannot make a tight U turn with a little effort.
 
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