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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a trailer in a bag and here are my first impressions and experiences.
For more information in the US, http://www.trailerinabag.com/ and for Canadians, http://www.motorcycleinnovations.com/

The idea of trailering my Burgman 650 is for the purposes of travel. The Burgman is a great touring bike but when we travel any distance my van is more practical. I was not happy with the idea of traveling around and having to leave the great freedom machine at home, hence the search for the trailer.
One other problem is that I don't really have space to store a trailer. I looked at all kinds of normal trailers but the storage problem kept coming up. So, surfing the net one snowy Sunday night I came across the Trailer In A bag site and even better was the fact that there was a Canadian supplier.
I emailed asking about pricing and that sort of stuff and got back an email very early the next morning from Gerry the owner quoting cost, I called Gerry on the phone and we had a chat and I ordered one of the trailers.
It took a couple weeks due to a redesign being done on the fenders but the two boxes arrived as promised.
Yep, two 70 pound boxes!
Weather here in Ottawa wasn't all that great and I had to get a hitch for my van and a license for the trailer so I left the trailer in our warehouse while I waited for better weather.
I did my first assembly of the trailer in the warehouse kind of to see if it was all there ... it was and it was pretty straight forward to put together.
It is a very solid piece of work. The pieces all pin together very easily and it is impossible to get it wrong. I think it took me 20 minutes the first time to figure it out and about 15 this afternoon for my first road test.

It is pretty much an aluminum channel mounted on a heavy square tubed steel T with two wheels. There is a front cross piece for tie down. The hitch is for a 2" ball and uses the standard flat 4 wire connector for lights.
It comes with a removable step that you use for your kick stand once you get the bike on the trailer while you are attaching your straps.

So how does it work, you ask!

I put it all together hooked it up to the van and that part went just as planned. Then came the challenge of loading the bike on the trailer, this is a bit of a challenge and can be scary, remember that it is just a T and only has side step for you to put your feet on once you are on the trailer. Add to this that the stand is on the side where your kick stand is and there is nothing on the other side for you to balance on. So you have to learn to trust the front bracket while you try to get your kick stand down on to the side step. It is really scary hanging up a foot or so in the air!
The secret I guess is to be firm, ride up the ramp, don't hesitate as I did and spin your tire on the smooth aluminum ramp.
I didn't drop the bike, got it on the trailer but I think that I will add a plank down the right side between the front tie down bar and the back axle just to make me more comfortable.

The trailer and bike pulled fine in my little tour around the area. The bike and trailer, about 750 pounds had little effect on my class III hitch on my van which is rated for 3500 pounds. It seem to be stable and solid.
The other part of this is that the trailer in now stored in very little space in my carport storage shed.

Trailer In A Bag is a well made piece of equipment that does what it says it will, it is easy to put together and it all can be done single handed. There are cheaper trailers but I couldn't find anything that would store the way this one does.
 

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Sails said:
Then came the challenge of loading the bike on the trailer, this is a bit of a challenge and can be scary, remember that it is just a T and only has side step for you to put your feet on once you are on the trailer.
Good write up Ken. Can you not use the axle of the trailer to balance with when riding up on the trailer? Rather than riding up, what about just pushing the bike up onto the trailer?
 

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so, how much was it?
 

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My question deals with the actual loading, whether driven or pushed.

How is this done? Does the trailer/channel tilt? Is there a ramp that attaches to the aluminum channel that can be removed later?

Oh.

I guess you did mention ramp. But is this piece part of the trailer or is it an extra piece that clips on and off? What is the approach angle?

Did you take it up to highway speeds? From what I saw, I did not see any sort of spring or shock abosorption hardware. I wonder how this thing would take bounces at highway speeds??

Thanks for the excellent review Sails!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
billmeek said:
Can you not use the axle of the trailer to balance with when riding up on the trailer? Rather than riding up, what about just pushing the bike up onto the trailer?
Bill,
If you do it in one shot there is no need to balance on the axle, if you are a wimp like I was they come in handy. I don't know if a shorter person would be able to make use of them and they are only a couple of inches wide.
As to pushing, a 650 up a hill is a challenge, I am sure it can be done but I found that riding it up worked just fine.
The Burgman is easy to control and is well balanced. The trailer is very stable, so the only shakey part in the deal was me!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
JohnnyDeath said:
so, how much was it?
My cost with fenders and the wider track was $1195 plus taxes and delivery, that is Canadian.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
captainfish said:
My question deals with the actual loading, whether driven or pushed.
You can do either but I think that pushing a 650 up a ramp will be a challenge.
As to the actual ramp part, it attaches the same way that everything else does, a hinged receiver is pinned to back of the trailer. Once you load the bike you unpin the ramp and store it in the vehicle. Like the rest of the trailer it is a solid piece of gear but it is amazingly light as it is mostly aluminum. I think that I may add some anti skid tape to it so I can get a better grip if I chicken out again.

I haven't had it up to seventy miles an hour yet but from what I have seen I don't think it will be a problem. The trailer is something like 60" wide with the bike centered on it, to me, it seems to be self righting if you hit a big pothole or bump. I am sure that you could create some way to overcome gravity and actually toss the whole thing up in the air but I don't expect to see it in normal driving. I think that the conditions that would cause a problem would cause problems with a normal suspensioned trailer as well.
The majority of the weight of the whole rig comes from the bike and the bike is suspensioned. Eventho the bike is tied down the suspension will handle all the weight and bumps with the trailer acting just as the wheels or like the wheels and axle on a regular trailer. So the bike's suspension is supporting the weight of the bike.
Anyways, that is my take on how the whole thing works and nothing to do with the company's opinion or documentation.
I hope I have asked your question and that this make sense!
 

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I really like what I saw on thier website as far as the setup and design, a really ingenious piece of work, but is it just me or does $800-$900 US seem a bit too high a price?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It is pricey!
At least that is what I thought about it and in comparison to prices of other trailers.
Once I got mine I kind of changed my mind.
They are a quality built piece that does exactly what it is designed to do.
I can get a trailer for hundreds less and it will go down the road just fine and even carry my Burgman 650 but the problem will come when I get home and want to store it.
I don't have the storage space for a full on trailer. My Trailerinabag in the storage compartment at the end of my carport, with my sails and the outboard for my sail boat as well as a whole pile of other 'junk' but the main thing is that it fits.
I hooked up the trailer once to see if it worked and if I could deal with it. It worked just fine so it is stored till I need it for a trip or have a problem.

For me the value is in the storage, this is just as important as being able to carrying the bike since I will spend more time riding than trailering. So, expensive? Maybe. Worth it the extra expense, definitely!
 
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