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Discussion Starter #1
Its not often you see the words "Touring" and "Burgman 400" used together. I know there are some folks out there who have ridden long trips on the 400, but not many. Of course, Mitch did a video of his trip from Austin, Texas, to Florida, but still . . .

I recently rode my '08 Burgman 400 on a 3,085 mile trip across eight states. I won't bore you with the tales of the ride (they're at http://burgmanusa.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=59304) but thought I would leave a few comments here about the bike itself and the gear.

First - the 400 was very capable of doing the trip. It ran flawlessly the whole time, including through a lot of rain, and I averaged 62.5 miles per gallon.

The only thing I did to the drive line was change to 19 gram Dr. Pully sliders, which lowered the RPM at cruising speed a lot. I seldom ride the Interstate highways (not my idea of fun), and most of the time was cruising at 55-60 mph. The bike was very comfortable at that speed. It was certainly capable of a higher cruising speed - I just didn't want to go any faster.

Having said that, in all honesty, it would have been nice to have a few extra ponies underneath me. There were those times when riding up a steep slope that the throttle was wide open and it would have been nice to have something in reserve. Other times, while passing a slow pickup truck, it would have been nice to zoom around a little quicker. No complaints - but the 400 just doesn't have the displacement to be a true cruiser.

The bike was very comfortable. I have the stock seat with only a wooden bead seat cover on it. My butt was not particularly sore at the end of the day. As to riding position, I have modified my bike with handlebar risers and the essential (for me) Bearcat back rest. The "sit up straight" riding position is very comfortable for me.

I have a large Givi Maxia E55 top case, which I use a lot during my daily commuting. It was very handy indeed to be able to easily take it off the bike and carry it into my motel room like a suitcase. Excellent. However, I also had a top-heavy feeling to the bike with all that weight in the case. Not a problem - not at all - but I can see where side bags or paniers might be a better way to go for long tours.

Riding gear - I wore my usual Motoport kevlar mesh gear, which was excellent. The weather changed a lot during the trip, from temps in the mid 90s to around 50. Kevlar mesh really is more comfortable in the heat than nylon - don't know why, but it is. When it got cool, it was easy to layer with the jacket liner and a wool shirt. My Frog Togs rain suit worked fine - I rode one entire day in the rain and only my feet got damp. I thought the floorboards would protect my feet from water, and they did for the most part, but at the end of the day-long rain, my socks were damp. I've been thinking about changing boots anyway - this time to get waterproof boots.

My one serious flaw in riding gear was gloves. I really like my kevlar gloves, but they are not waterproof. I had dish-pan hands at the end of one day, but the gloves dried out very quickly in the motel room. The oversight was mine - I just didn't plan on wet weather well enough.

I have a Garmin Zumo 220 GPS on the bike - and learned the hard way to be sure to update the maps before planning a trip. I really wish Garmin would improve their trip planning software - it works, but it sure is clunky.

I solved the problem of having enough water handy using my Liquid Caddy holder on the handle bars, but also by keeping an extra bottle attached to the passenger seat rest using some of my photography gear. I use the Think Tank photo gear to carry my equipment (I am a sports photographer) and the mesh water bottle pouch was perfect hanging on the back of the bike.

All in all a good trip - and I'll do it again. Most likely I will ride this bike until the wheels fall off, and then, if I am still young enough to ride, I might consider a slightly larger bike. A Burgman 650 perhaps?
 

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Doug thank you for talking the time to share your experience in such a considered way.
 

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was the lack of horses enough of a problem to make you want to cancel any further trips on the 400 or a forgiveable nuisance ?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
mikeyMarine said:
was the lack of horses enough of a problem to make you want to cancel any further trips on the 400 or a forgiveable nuisance ?
Forgivable nuisance. In fact, I am thinking of doing some more trips like this - maybe west the next time. If I do, then I'll be in real mountains and I'll see if the altitude bothers the 400 too much to ride in the Rockies. As I say, I'll ride the wheels off this one, then see what happens after that.
 

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I think the common experience is that performance improves at altitude (obviously there are natural limits to that). ;-)
 

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There was a Majesty rider a few years ago, who left from British Columbia and circled down to the lower southeast portion of the USA and then made his way back up across the upper plains area. Like you, he hit some rain...the outskirts of a hurricane in his case. Two weeks after getting back, he went down the the Northwest Maxi-Scoot rally in the Columbia Gorge, and then left from there for California.

Touring is just a longer multi-day version of commuting.

Chris
 

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Forgivable nuisance. In fact, I am thinking of doing some more trips like this - maybe west the next time. If I do, then I'll be in real mountains and I'll see if the altitude bothers the 400 too much to ride in the Rockies. As I say, I'll ride the wheels off this one, then see what happens after that.
I live near and have gone over/through the Rockies a few times on my 400. While fuel consumption has interestingly seemed to improve, you've got fewer horses and less power. I found that at its worst, there would be just a minute or two where I couldn't quite maintain the speed limit at full throttle (but, was still passing some cars). I've ridden to Ft. Worth on it and was pleased with the extra pep it had at the lower elevation (600 feet ASL for Ft. Worth vs 5000 feet for Grand Junction and 8000 to 10000 for the mountain passes). I've been very curious as to the effect of the 19 gm DP slider weights over the passes.
 

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Excellent write up. Thanks. Here in 'Urop' we use the B400 for everything including going 'intercontinental'. It's not uncommon for folks to go 3-4k miles on tour. The B400 was built for it. And the bonus is the gas mileage. It's brilliant as you know. We have bigger gallons so we go further... :lol: I recently went from the UK to a european capital city for a business meeting and my colleagues arrived on their Burgmans. One a 400, and the other on a 650. Both bikes had travelled around 1500 miles to meet me. Both riders do that sort of thing all the time. Both are pleased beyond words with the performance of their Burgmans. That says it all!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Scooter_Maniac said:
I live near and have gone over/through the Rockies a few times on my 400. While fuel consumption has interestingly seemed to improve, you've got fewer horses and less power. I found that at its worst, there would be just a minute or two where I couldn't quite maintain the speed limit at full throttle (but, was still passing some cars). I've ridden to Ft. Worth on it and was pleased with the extra pep it had at the lower elevation (600 feet ASL for Ft. Worth vs 5000 feet for Grand Junction and 8000 to 10000 for the mountain passes). I've been very curious as to the effect of the 19 gm DP slider weights over the passes.
I love Grand Junction - in fact, I wouldn't mind living there. Close to the mountains, but without the hassle of big city Denver. I have a brother who is in Littleton and I used to live in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Frankly, I miss New Mexico - magic place - and used to have a place in Angel Fire in the northern mountains. I live in deep south Texas now - flat as a table top.

For everyone who has posted - and especially for those of you who have noted others take long rides on 400s - thanx. It is a very capable machine, but I often read queries on the BUSA forum from newbies asking if a 400 is capable of going some distance. Besides the fact that I just wanted to share the fun I had, I also wanted others to know my experience and possibly encourage others who have the time to take long rides on a 400.
 

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Scooter_Maniac said:
...I found that at its worst, there would be just a minute or two where I couldn't quite maintain the speed limit at full throttle (but, was still passing some cars). ...00
Living here in the Seattle area, we have a number of mountain passes. There are always the people in their SUVs with massive engines in them that want to do 80 mph going over the pass...but that's only about 10% of the drivers. Most of the rest are willing to slow down to 50-70 mph going over the pass. My point is that even cars will struggle going over the passes...and my 400cc Burgman fits in right along with them. Do I have "passing power" at 70 mph at that speed? No. But neither do the cars. Besides, the max speed limit is 70 mph, so why do I need to pass anyone at that speed?

Comanche said:
...I often read queries on the BUSA forum from newbies asking if a 400 is capable of going some distance. Besides the fact that I just wanted to share the fun I had, I also wanted others to know my experience and possibly encourage others who have the time to take long rides on a 400.
That's one of the reasons I rode the SS1000 last June. The bike purred along on the entire trip cruising at speeds up to 80mph for hours on end. The only limitation for touring is the same as you'd have with any bike...how much you can strap onto it.

Chris
 

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You can tour on any 2 wheeler starting with a bicycle (which some people have toured the Alps on). Log onto Advrider and you'll see reports of people riding everything from 50cc Hondas on up around the country and the world. :thumbup:
 

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I bought my 400 in July this year, rode it 1100 miles to Ohio, astonished at how much power it had and how easy it was to maintain any speed (up to 80 mph). From a 24 cubic inch motor :D And I was initially worried about its highway potential.
Heading back down to AL in a week or two, with 19g Dr Pulley sliders installed. :D :D
Probably via interstates, to save time.
at 60-70 mph the Dr Pulleys give 70 mpg.
Fun fun fun :)
 

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I see nothing wrong with touring on Burgman 400----engine works hard, returned yesterday from 3 day 1400 plus mile deal. Burgman worked well on backroads for AL/MS/LA----- K & N air filter intake noise bothersome---stock better. Yesterday long hard/freeway, used 8-9000 RPM often-----oil level went below sight glass----3-400cc brought it back to normal...BUT something to watch!! I check oil everyday, too. Shell Rotella---think I have to go back to WalMart oil.

Biggest drawback with 400 is the HORRIBLE buffeting---I have 7JUROCK shield in stock height----I must look over to stay alive---55-60 mph ok----but hours at 75-80 mph can drive you nuts....of course stock shield much worse. All maxiscooters seem to have this problem----only my SilverWing could air be managed well with various "tricks" and GIVI adjustable shield-----the GIVI adjustable did not work for me on Burgman(I have had all new, SilverWing 600/TMAX/Reflex/4 Helix) so have been buffeted a lot-----I use as baseline for comparison either BMW equipped with Heinrich uppers and lowers or current Honda NT700V (had one)---this bike can have very calm air 60-70mph. My next 2 wheel purchase, hopefully will have good air management.
 

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Very nice report.
A white B-400 has caught my eye lately, so has a white 2013 Yamaha Tenere.

TFS
 

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I fixed the buffeting problem with my 400 Burgman by fitting an xscreen made in Germany to my standard screen. Viola no more buffeting.
 

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Last summer, at 5,000-7,000 feet along the Front Range in Colorado, I average 72 mpg on the at freeway speed. Here in Texas at 700-1500 feet above sea level, I get in the mid-50s. (Yes, I kept the tire pressure constant) The explanation that seems most plausible to me is that the computer leans the mixture. Performance does suffer, but not enough for me to leave the Burgman home on long trips. It easily climbed Pikes Peak. The only problem was on the way down, the scooter lacks the engine braking of a true motorcycle. Still, I stopped at the check point on the way down to have the brake temperature checked. It as in the low 100s, just fine. (The checker originally waived me on, thinking I was on a motorcycle, but I stopped and asked him to put is probe on my brakes.

I toured for years on a 1972 CB 750, a Virago 920, and now I have a ST1100. Really, I like the Burgman when it's just myself. (If my wife is along, then I prefer the ST1100.) With a top case, saddle-bags, and a duffle bag or jump bag on the seat behind me, and the under-the-seat storage, the Burgman is a pack mule. I can get more on it than the large Honda. And it gives me more seating positions than the Honda tourer, something my 49-year-old-surgically-repaired knee appreciates.

And I live fuel economy. I inherited a Dust Bowl-Depression Era mentality from my father. Husband your resources, don't waste them. Mindless consumption is exactly that--mindless.
 

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Didn't quite add up the miles that you did, but I've been up and down the California coast on http://www.scs.unr.edu/~sulli_t/scoot_site/rides.html to see the old missions. The .PDF versions have pictures. Never had the slightest problem on the 400. After the first trip, I was able to lighten the load quite a bit for the second one. Definitely packed the Givi box lighter.
 
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