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Hey, if you know of a Vietnam Veteran, give them some thanks. Not just USA service members were there so this goes out world wide. Thanks Vets.

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Thank you veterans!
 

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I listened to the Dixie Chicks Travlin' Soldier today. Always brings a tear to the eye.

Thanks vets for all you've done.
 

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As a Vietnam vet, I feel as if I need to say something here. Many of you who thank a Vietnam Vet for their service will notice that many of us don't respond to your thank-you's as other war vets respond. This is because of the way we were treated when we came home from Vietnam. The treatment from the public was so bad that we Marines were told that we were not to wear uniforms in public. We were verbally and physically assaulted. It is very hard to for us to forget this. Getting thanks for serving in Vietnam this many years after we were not welcomed home after the war makes some of us angry now. What was done to us cannot be undone.

Doug from Kentucky (Vietnam Vet, USMC)
 

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As a Vietnam vet, I feel as if I need to say something here. Many of you who thank a Vietnam Vet for their service will notice that many of us don't respond to your thank-you's as other war vets respond. This is because of the way we were treated when we came home from Vietnam. The treatment from the public was so bad that we Marines were told that we were not to wear uniforms in public. We were verbally and physically assaulted. It is very hard to for us to forget this. Getting thanks for serving in Vietnam this many years after we were not welcomed home after the war makes some of us angry now. What was done to us cannot be undone.

Doug from Kentucky (Vietnam Vet, USMC)
Well stated - and thank you from one Viet Nam vet to another.
 

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As an Australian Vietnam veteran, we received similar responses upon our return home but then a few years later a "welcome home march" changed peoples attitude & today our efforts are recognised & through our Vietnam Veterans Federation we are again a fighting force for veterans rights including all conflicts since e.g. Iraq, Timor & Afghanistan. Within this organisation we have all manner of assistance for our ex & serving military from help with claims, "Men's Sheds" & welfare assistance. There is no stigma attached to an Australian Vietnam veteran any longer here in Oz. I am personally honoured by those of you who thank those of us, thank you.
 

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As a Vietnam vet, I feel as if I need to say something here. Many of you who thank a Vietnam Vet for their service will notice that many of us don't respond to your thank-you's as other war vets respond. This is because of the way we were treated when we came home from Vietnam. The treatment from the public was so bad that we Marines were told that we were not to wear uniforms in public. We were verbally and physically assaulted. It is very hard to for us to forget this. Getting thanks for serving in Vietnam this many years after we were not welcomed home after the war makes some of us angry now. What was done to us cannot be undone.

Doug from Kentucky (Vietnam Vet, USMC)

Those were the worst of times , that whole decade sucked for our generation . So many friends and class mates killed and or messed up for life . FOR WHAT ?

TheReaper!
 

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Not all of us were against the troops, just the government! I still say thanks for your sacrifice and I'm sorry for the ones I knew that never came back...
 

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I'm a Vietnam Vet and the worst treatment I have ever had in my life came from the Regional Office in St Petersburg Florida.
I understand. I helped with the evacuation of Saigon Vietnam during the Fall of Saigon and the Evacuation of Phnom Penh Cambodia during the Killing Fields. I was awarded two Armed Forces Expeditionary Medals for this as well as some other medals. I have a copy of a US Marine Corps letter allowing for us to convert one of our Armed Forces Expeditionary Medals to Vietnam Service Medal. Approximately three years ago I submitted for my medal to be exchanged to the Vietnam Service medal. Send my letter to Saint Louis and receive a post card in about three months that they were forwarding my request to Washington DC for further action. I have heard nothing since. From my viewpoint, we Vietnam Vets are still being treated poorly. I need this medal to get my VA benefits straightened out. They don''t seem like they care at all about this to my viewpoint.

Namaste'
Doug from Kentucky
 

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As a Vietnam vet, I feel as if I need to say something here. Many of you who thank a Vietnam Vet for their service will notice that many of us don't respond to your thank-you's as other war vets respond. This is because of the way we were treated when we came home from Vietnam. The treatment from the public was so bad that we Marines were told that we were not to wear uniforms in public. We were verbally and physically assaulted. It is very hard to for us to forget this. Getting thanks for serving in Vietnam this many years after we were not welcomed home after the war makes some of us angry now. What was done to us cannot be undone.

Doug from Kentucky (Vietnam Vet, USMC)
As a serviceman who served in the Airforce I sympathise with you as this attitude was also in Australia but here those who were sent to Vietnam were conscripts in the main, not volunteers. The public were quick to recognise that the whole episode was based on lies aka Gulf of Tonkin incident and so on and as our Governor General did not declare war on Vietnam as he should have under our constitution the people smelled a rat. The rat was the world bankers making mega profits at the expense of Australian and American lives plus Vietnamese including 1.5 million woman and children.
The reality was thousands died just so the CIA could take over the drug trade from the French and Bell helicopter would not go into bankruptcy.
Wars are about profits and i refuse to commemorate Vietnam or any war for that matter. I was abhored by the number of starving Vets on the streets begging for food and help when i was on an official visit to Navy in San Diego. I bought one man an evening meal and learn't his terrible story as he opened my eyes to the truth. We were and still are being lied to just so banksters can continue to profit out of war and human misery. The most recent 9/11 and Bush's weapons of mass destruction are other lies that come to mind. Of course many will object to these truths and probably bar me from the site.
 

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We were not appreciated for the lost years of our lives. Too many draft dodgers that beat the draft and then called us every name in the book when we returned home. Sometimes today I will wear a military hat and now I occasionally will hear "Thank you for your service".
Too bad there is no longer a draft, then maybe more of our youth would appreciate our country more. Maybe one should have served in the military before holding a public office. Then maybe there would not be so many useless wars. I noticed in Coles Department Stores fine Columbia jackets made in North Viet Nam - go figure. Gee, I thought we were at war one time with North Viet Nam.
Respectfully,
David Miller
 

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As someone who was born during the in 68, growing up I never really understood any of it. As a veteran as well, I know and respect what a it means. After reading Doug's comments, it is hard to recall any movie where the vets came home to a big welcome. I have the deepest respect for those who came before me. I was fortunate. I never was never shot at nor did I have to shoot anyone.
 

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I didn't know that and it's a strange coincidence. This weekend I talked to a guy whom I had not heard from for almost 50 years since we were brand new "3rd" lieutenants in officers training at Quantico. 10% of my company from USMC officer's basic were killed in Vietnam. Not to mention others that I knew from college and from serving together. Today I had a note from the Catholic Military Archdiocese about a chaplain that I met in Vietnam, who was killed and later awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

We did what we saw as our duty, even though our leaders seemed to have a very muddled vision. Say what you want about how we were treated when we came back -- as I remember all too well -- but those who berated us don't need to change us, and we may never change them. Yes, I remember being confronted several times with" how many babies did you kill."

When I moved to West Virginia in 2007, I got two memorable shocks. First, when I went to DMV to register my cars, the first thing the lady at the counter said was, "Thank you for your service" when she saw my Vietnam Veteran cap. I got a Vietnam Vets license plate. Second. a few months later in the Home Depot parking lot, a young woman started pounding on the rolled up window of my car as I was about to drive off. I rolled it down and she said, "I just want to say thank you." Similar things have also happened.

Yes, it may be late. Yet, it has been enough to bring a tear to my eye whenever someone say that. Maybe West Virginia is just different. I'm grateful to those who have taken the time to express their thanks. Late or not, there are and were many good-hearted people who did appreciate us and prayed for us regardless of what they thought of the war.
 

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As a Vietnam vet, I feel as if I need to say something here. Many of you who thank a Vietnam Vet for their service will notice that many of us don't respond to your thank-you's as other war vets respond. This is because of the way we were treated when we came home from Vietnam. The treatment from the public was so bad that we Marines were told that we were not to wear uniforms in public. We were verbally and physically assaulted. It is very hard to for us to forget this. Getting thanks for serving in Vietnam this many years after we were not welcomed home after the war makes some of us angry now. What was done to us cannot be undone.

Doug from Kentucky (Vietnam Vet, USMC)
We were told the same thing in the USAF during that time. I recall how proud I was to be serving in the USAF, serving my country, and how let down I was that I couldn't even wear my uniform in the civilian world without the worry of being assaulted. How sad. However, I am still proud of my service and I thank everyone else who served or is currently serving. God bless you all!
 

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After reading Doug's comments, it is hard to recall any movie where the vets came home to a big welcome.
I was an Army Brat but I never served myself and I'm one of those who does thank those in uniform for their service when I encounter them.

But I have to ask if anyone's seen We Were Soldiers? To my mind, this is not only the best Vietnam War film ever made, it's one of the best films about any war - right up there with Paths Of Glory. It doesn't glorify, it doesn't belittle, it gives a "warts and all" look at the early days of the war and shows both the heroism and the terrible cost on both sides of the Battle of Ia Drang on November 14, 1965.
 
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