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While riding with a group one of our guys got a flat. He had to be towed away. Is there any permanent liquid tire sealant on the market. Also which is the best electric pump or CO2 unit on the market. Do you install the sealant before (When you don't have a flat) or after. Will it last the life of the tire or just enough to limp in to a shop to have the tire replaced.
 

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I carry a Stop And Go tire plug kit, it comes with mushroom head shape plugs, and the tools needed to put them in, I have used it once, worked great, is small and easy to carry. I use a 12 volt compressor made by Slime, it works very well, I have used it for several years for normal tire upkeep, and the one time I had to plug a tire, it is not the smallest pump around, but is not too big and really works, plus the clip on fitting on the end of hose fits the Burgman valve stems well, some others don't.
 

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My experience with Sto & Go plugs ahs not been that good.

1) For a test, I put a nail straight into the flat part of a tire I was replacing anyway (wore out) to see if i could plug it. Took two times to get a plug to hold and it had a slow leak (likely would have made it home had it happened on a ride - I also carry a Slime Compresor on most distant rides).

2) I plugged a Car Tire (Mounted on my Burgman 650) with Stop & Go. Took three attempts and finally worked when I put some rubber cement around behind the plug before putting it in the gun. It is hard to get cement into the hole or behind the plug (behind the mnushroom where it sits aginst the tire once it is installed). If you put it on the head of the Mushroom Plug, it gets wiped off when you slide the plug into the hole. Anyway, I rode that tire for a number of miles (5000 or so) with no leaks and finally worried about it so much, I replaced the tire.

3) Friends Valkyrie had a nail in rear tire about 60 miles from home. We tried to plug it with the Stop & Go several times and even went to a Advance Auto Store to get rubber cement. No Luck. Then he bought the string plugs and we finally got the thing stopped leaking. He rode it home with us making several stops to make sure it was OK. Next day when he went out to ride it to the shop for a new tire, it was flat. He pumped it up and made it to the store.

That Said, I still carry the Stop & Go and also some String Repair (which has cement with it). Hopefully, get stopped leaking enough to make it home and keep it pumped up witht he portabel compressor.

I think it might be smart to carry Slime to put in the tire when you have a flat 9but it looks to me like some bikes valve stem location would make it hard to get it in).

One good thing about the Scooter - room to carry stuff. Not so on some MCs.
 

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I've had good luck plugging tires with the stop & go plugs. I carry a bottle of slime too just in case the plugs don't seal. Only had to use it once. I also carry string plugs as a backup. Kind of a belt and suspender approach.

I use to carry a CO2 kit on my 400 to inflate a tire in an emergency. Carried it for several years without having to use it. When I went to I discovered that over time the CO2 cartridges loose their pressure. Went through all four cartridges I had and only ended up with about 8 lbs of pressure in the tire. I carry an electric compressor on that bike now like the one I have always carried on the 650. Suggest that if you are depending on a CO2 kit to inflate tires you replace the cartridges every year or two.

Also ran into an issue with the string type plugs. Over time the tubes of cement in those kits dry up so you need to check them and replace the glue occasionally.
 

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I used Ride-On sealant in tubes but I wouldn't use any liquid goop inside tubeless tires. Too much mess when it comes time to change tires.

I prefer old-fashioned sticky-string tire repair kits and a 12V compressor (Slime makes a fine small one). Count me as another unsatisfied Stop-N-Go mushroom plug gun user. It failed me twice in the field (slow leaks continued immediately) and then two more times "on the bench" (trying it in non-emergency circumstances to see if a friend and I could make it work on a sacrificial tire). None of my sticky-string repairs ever failed.
 

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I always carry a compressor and those gummy worm/sticky string plugs.
I have also used Slime and can attest that it works. 5 nails in 1 back tire and it never went flat on me. I did find and plug the nails as I found them and kept rolling.
 

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Slime compressor for emergencies, and ran all season on a Slime repaired rear. No highway though. Will replace it (and find out just how much mess is in there!) for start of next season. Yes, we're about done for riding weather already. Sigh.
 

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I have wanted to in a product like ride on but have always been hesitant. I have used slime in my bicycle and it didn't work worth a hoot. If puncture protection products work so well, how come they are not recommended when you buy a new tire? I would think that the tire people and MC dealerships would be interested maximum rider safety. :confused:
 

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Ride On tire sealant in my last 3 bikes. Never had a flat, but the best feature IMHO, is the balancing it provides. Fantastic! Absolutely smooth, vibration-free ride at ALL speeds. And, more even tire wear without any scalloping. Wouldn't ride without it.
 

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If puncture protection products work so well, how come they are not recommended when you buy a new tire? I would think that the tire people and MC dealerships would be interested maximum rider safety. :confused:
Though I have not tried any of these puncture protection products, I can pretty much guarantee you that both tire people and MC dealerships are primarily interested in staying solvent. They're not actually out to injure and kill bikers, but safety is NOT their primary focus.
 

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If puncture protection products work so well, how come they are not recommended when you buy a new tire? I would think that the tire people and MC dealerships would be interested maximum rider safety. :confused:
When it came time for me to get a new rear tire, I had taken the tire off myself and took it, and the new tire to a local dealer for them to mount. I took along with me a bottle of Ride ON, his comment to me was...
"Good stuff, we recommend it to everyone, whenever they're putting on new tires."
 

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When it came time for me to get a new rear tire, I had taken the tire off myself and took it, and the new tire to a local dealer for them to mount. I took along with me a bottle of Ride ON, his comment to me was...
"Good stuff, we recommend it to everyone, whenever they're putting on new tires."
OK, I have a desire to use Ride On. My rear tire is almost new and I need a new front. From the video you posted, it wasn't clear to me if the tire weights are to be removed. Is this proper procedure? I don't have a bottle or instructions in hand. Another question. Does this mean that the tire has to rebalance itself every time you start out from a stop? If so, apparently no problems esp in cold weather?
 

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I carry always these two items in the main trunk:






and for longer riders I also carry the stop&go plug kit.
 

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OK, I have a desire to use Ride On. My rear tire is almost new and I need a new front. From the video you posted, it wasn't clear to me if the tire weights are to be removed. Is this proper procedure? I don't have a bottle or instructions in hand. Another question. Does this mean that the tire has to rebalance itself every time you start out from a stop? If so, apparently no problems esp in cold weather?
No need to remove weights. But, if you do not use any weights, you can increase the amount of RideOn by 25%. And, the tires do not rebalance themselves after each stop, they stay in balance even after extended parking, even in very cold weather. Good stuff.
 

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OK, I have a desire to use Ride On. My rear tire is almost new and I need a new front. From the video you posted, it wasn't clear to me if the tire weights are to be removed. Is this proper procedure? I don't have a bottle or instructions in hand. Another question. Does this mean that the tire has to rebalance itself every time you start out from a stop? If so, apparently no problems esp in cold weather?
This link may answer some of your questions

http://www.ride-on.com/tire-balancer.html
 

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Thanks Yoda and Dan. That is the kind of info and testimony I am looking for.
 

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My wife's bike developed a bead leak last summer. We put Ride-On in the tire and checked it frequently for the next few weeks. No more leaking. Next time I put new tires on, I may put Ride-On inside to eliminate the chance it will happen again. (She rode on a low tire maybe half a day, long enough to ruin it.)

I have used gummy-worm plugs in the past, but only long enough to get to a new tire. I'm not entirely convinced they are bulletproof, so won't rely on them for any length of time. I'd rather not take chances where tires are involved. YMMV.

Regards
Scott Fraser
Calgary
 

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I'm surprised Ride-On fixed a bead leak. You were lucky, because Ride-On is only meant to seal the tread area and aid in balancing. When you ride the Ride-On is thrown out to the tread area and even when stopped it won't be close to the bead.
 

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When I developed a slow leak back in June, I asked on this very board about sealants, and everyone told me not to do it--just replace the tire. Now people are singing the praises of sealants. Which is it?
 
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