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I was considering a similar product called Green Stuff - same idea. My motorcycle mechanic told me to stay away from stuff like that because it throws off the balance of the bike.

- Chuck
 

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I must be missing the point, if the stuff stays a liquid in the tire then you have a mess at the bottom of your tire every morning , and when you start you will have to go real slow for awhile to spread it out again.
If it does not stay liquid then it will just dry out with all the heat.
I use that Green Slime in my garden tractor wheels and it works, but that's always slow speed.
While there are new things coming along everyday a lot of them are still the old "Snake Oil " in a new package.
I am not saying this does not work, I just don't know. But at 70 mph with only my tires between me and a world of hurt I am not going to be the one to find out. :wink:
 

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I carry a 4 oz. bottle of a similar product I bought at Target for half that per bottle price.
I don't put it in the tire now but if I had a flat & I couldn't find the hole to patch it or somehow it wouldn't hold air then I would try it to at least get me to where I could get the tire repaired or replaced.
 

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gruntled wrote
I don't put it in the tire now but if I had a flat & I couldn't find the hole to patch it or somehow it wouldn't hold air then I would try it to at least get me to where I could get the tire repaired or replaced.
Now that's an idea worth taking.
Thanks. :)
 

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I know a guy whose been using Green Slime for years in his MC tires. The mfg. recommends using it up to 1-2 years. You can actually see green spots where the sealant has sealed off on his tread. :eek:

I've tried other, cheaper stuff, but it dries out some time.
 

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Cans of Tire fix Goo

I've used the emergency tire inflation goo before. You remove the
nail, inflate the tire with the can of goo. The tire will stay inflated
for awhile, then go flat. Surprisingly, if you ride off quickly, the
tire will stay inflated. I guess the liquid rubber spreads through the
tire, sealing the hole. Allow the tire to stop, the liquid settles away
from the hole and the tire goes flat.

The shops hate the stuff. It makes a mess of the tire machine,
the rim, the mechanic...

I would choose to use the rubber plugs. There's a new tool for
inserting rubber plugs into tires that is getting some aclaim.
A "smart" brand air pump is a good way to go for inflating the tire.

In summary, it works in an emergency, but causes problems down the
road. I would stick with plugs.
 

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gruntled said:
...I don't put it in the tire now but if I had a flat & I couldn't find the hole to patch it or somehow it wouldn't hold air then I would try it to at least get me to where I could get the tire repaired or replaced.
I haven't tried anything like this on two wheels, but when I was in the executive/dignitary protection field (fancy name for bodyguard) we used a similar product in our vehicles.

The object was that if a puncture occurred (by accident or design) while driving this would self-seal preventing a crash or stoppage.

Same for bikes, I quess. If it works as advertised, it could prevent a nasty spill if you get a large puncture from a stray roofing nail or something.

If you're going to wait until after the tire goes flat then Puncture Seal or one of those other pressurized foam products would do the trick. They pump up the tire, too. But, yeah, they can be messy for the tire shop guys.

Same with plugs and other repair tools; they only work after you're stopped, although they're cleaner than the foam stuff.
 

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I worked in a tireshop over 10 years. I hate that stuff because it stinks,
messy, and they only work for a short time anyway.
I have a burgman 400 and it comes with a 12v outlet, so I carry a 12v electric air pump in the trunk at all times. I got it from Canadian Tires, reg $20.00 (cdn) on sale $10.00 (cdn) If you pick up a nail, it will leak slowly, so just pump it up and ride to a shop and get a fix or just ride home and fix it the next day because bad things always happen on a sat
night where everything is closed.
Having a repair kit is good but you have to know how to use it properly.
You HAVE to know the angle the nail went in, if the nail went in kind off
in an angle, and you put the plug in straight, you know what? You just made a new hole. :cry:
 

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Be careful, some of the stuff is flamable! The Sept issue of Wing World (GWRRA--GoldWing Road Riders Association magazine) has an article about using tire sealants. The gist was that some of them contain propane and butane propellants. One spark and BAM!!!!!! Also there have been cases of extreme rim corrosion caused by various sealants.
 

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Bill Trammell said:
Be careful, some of the stuff is flamable! The Sept issue of Wing World (GWRRA--GoldWing Road Riders Association magazine) has an article about using tire sealants. The gist was that some of them contain propane and butane propellants. One spark and BAM!!!!!! Also there have been cases of extreme rim corrosion caused by various sealants.

Was this BAM speculation or actual testimony to such? I've never heard of this actually happening on any vehicle. :?
 

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Randy in norCal said:
[quote="Bill Trammell":3du63w4e]Be careful, some of the stuff is flamable! The Sept issue of Wing World (GWRRA--GoldWing Road Riders Association magazine) has an article about using tire sealants. The gist was that some of them contain propane and butane propellants. One spark and BAM!!!!!! Also there have been cases of extreme rim corrosion caused by various sealants.

Was this BAM speculation or actual testimony to such? I've never heard of this actually happening on any vehicle. :?[/quote:3du63w4e]

It has reportedly happened in tire shops when the repair person was smoking -- God's way of saying "quit" maybe.

Some cans now come with a sticker you're supposed to attach to the tire to warn that it's no longer plain air in there; other brands are switching to non-flammable propellants, but they take bigger cans to do the job.

Those are the "after-the-flat" kinds though. I don't think the self-sealing/pre-puncture kind use flammable gas, but I'd probably change the air in them after installing just to be sure.
 
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