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I run at the reccomended (1 up) 36 PSI rear and 33 front (cold) .. Is this pretty much OK ? Also how often do folks check their tire pressure on the OEM tire? As a practical matter, I don't check it that often and am wondering if I should. I have about 5200 miles on my 2012 650.. rear tire looks OK.. no wear bars yet.. and front looks fine..
 

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I run 29 front, 36 rear on both my 400, and my 650.

This for a 250lb rider. Both bikes handle well.

Tire wear I have difficulty commenting on. Got the 400 with 12,000 on it. Changed tires at about 14,000, and since then have had two rear punctures..........so not getting enough life out of the tires to wear them! got a little over 17,000 on it now.

650 purchased new, with just under 3,000 on it now. Rear tire looks at about 1/3-1/2 life gone, front looks scrubbed in.
 

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You'll get a lot of different opinions on what tire pressures to run. Best I can tell you is to experiment and figure out what works for you. I run 36 psi in the front tire because I found if I run it below that the tire has a tendancey to cup and if I run it higher than that cornering grip suffers. I run 40 in the rear tire because I've found that gets me the best tire wear and still offers good grip in the corners. Those numbers may or may not work for you.

I check my tire pressure at least once a week.
 

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On my 2011 Exec the manual calls for 33 PSI front tire and 41 PSI rear tire. These are for both solo and dual riding. I usually run 34 in the front and 42 in the rear. I can't complain about the mileage I get out of the Bridgestone tires.

Bill
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks.. I did a search but the word tire & Pressure got me way too many hits... I went to the Burgman Knowledge base which shows the 33 & 36 numbers.. I thought there may be a lot of different opinions and I am glad to hear them !
 

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Thanks.. I did a search but the word tire & Pressure got me way too many hits... I went to the Burgman Knowledge base which shows the 33 & 36 numbers.. I thought there may be a lot of different opinions and I am glad to hear them !
 

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I agree 100% with Buffalo - you find what works for you, not by consenus. You may not feel any difference in changing (cold) pressure in one psi increments, but try two or three. Personally, I run 33 in front and about 40 in the back. I am using Pirelli Diablos and love 'em.

:thumbup:
 

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LeDude said:
I run 40 psi on the front and 42 psi in the back.

check the pressure weekly when I wash the scoot, daily when I am on the road.

Try different PSIs until you find the ones that work best for your riding style/needs.
I did mine the same today on my new to me 650 Burg , I liked to a lot .
I think I'm going to try more air in my Tmax too , I've been filling it to
spec but as soon as the front tire loses a couple pounds the front
end gets squishy . And I really hate squishy . Thanks for another lesson :thumbup:

TheReaper!
 

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Bill-Bill said:
On my 2011 Exec the manual calls for 33 PSI front tire and 41 PSI rear tire. These are for both solo and dual riding. I usually run 34 in the front and 42 in the rear. I can't complain about the mileage I get out of the Bridgestone tires.

I use the same PSI. The reason I use one PSI more then the manual is I have PSI air pressure monitors on the valve stems and they only come in even numbers. I found them on Ebay. When you get to be 81 it's hard to measure the air pressure in the rear tire. Now I only have to look at the color of the cap to know if the air pressure is low. The cost is less then two bucks each.

I wonder why Suzuki keeps changing the air pressure on different year models.
 

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THe trouble with much over 40 in the rear is that it will quickly run into over 50 when hot (I have a real time reader ) and anything over about 46 hot gets squirrelly especially on the front.

37 front and 40 rear is where I start and it tends to drift down over a few weeks to 35 and 38 and then I top up.

37 front gets to 41 and 40 rear to about 47 tops on a long run on a hot day.
 

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Do any of you find that air pressure in the rear tends to drift down more than the front?

MACDOC why do inflate the front tire so much greater than the manual recommends?
Yet, for the rear you inflate less than the manual.

FYI, the maximum tire pressure is based on COLD PSI so the manufacturer accounts for the fact the tires will expand under heat.

I'm using 44 PSI in the rear and 35 PSI in the front.

My 2013 came with a metal piece at an angle for inflating the rear tire. Did the dealer install this valve? It makes inflating the rear tire much easier than inflating the front one.
 

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Because it works for me. I've been riding long enough to get a feel for the tires and when I'm touring it helps mileage..

The tires never stay anywhere near cold pressure
 

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Because it works for me. I've been riding long enough to get a feel for the tires and when I'm touring it helps mileage..

The tires never stay anywhere near cold pressure

Okay. I get it. What about loss of pressure in the front vs rear? which do you think tends to need more frequent inflation?

Thanks
 

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Rear because it gets hotter but not all lose air.
It's the reason I got the real time monitor so I could always see what was up
 

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Anything other than range between manual recommendation and sidewall pressure on these tires doesn't seem very smart to me. Unless you are a tire engineer with very good reasoning.
 

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When I got home in 88 degree weather after a 85 mph run for 1/2 hour the front was 41 lb and the rear 47.
Unfortunately I did not note the internal temps.
( 38 and 40 respectively cold ....the mechanic just filled them the day before and the TPMS confirmed that.

A softer fill would likely
a) get to the same pressure at those speeds or even higher due to extra heat.
b) run hotter

This is a general comment on tires but it applies to the Burgman as well...

-Lower inflation numbers (28-35 psi) will give you a soft, smooth ride but your tires will run hotter and your fuel economy will suffer. -
You are very likely to end up with the same pressure at speed but have more heat which is brutal on that rear tire.

The Shinko was at 41 cold the first PA run two weeks ago and it stepped out a bit in the twists.
I was taking it easy in the twists this time with only the front brake to rely on but the front stayed nicely on line tho I missed having the rear to work with. Was interesting practice and sure pointed out how useful the rear brake is especially at low speed.

For reference.
New Shinko ( bought a spare )


Have ridden this about 6,000 km





Kids - sport bike tire.

 

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Anything other than range between manual recommendation and sidewall pressure on these tires doesn't seem very smart to me. Unless you are a tire engineer with very good reasoning.
Agreed. I made sure my Front Tire pressure was 34 PSI and the Rear is now exactly 41 PSI.

Thanks for the post.
 

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Glad you don't have twisties in Florida.

You have no idea what those tires are at after you've run the expressway for an hour.

Those "recommendations" cover riding conditions from below freezing to 120 F.

Do you really think one set of guideline pressures will serve for all conditions???
 
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