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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, I know many have said they keep a tire plug kit with them when riding. But I made the mistake of reading my manual today and it says:

"Do not use an external repair plug to repair a puncture since the plug may work loose as a result of the cornering forces experienced in a motorcycle tire"

Any comments?

Dave B.
 

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There was a long discussion about this on another forum. Almost 100% agreement, no plugs (permanently).
What you need to do to get home is up to you, I know a guy put a #12 sheet metal screw in the hole filled it with air and road home
-he did not say but I suspect very slowly-
Myself being of a the lazy persuasion I fill it with an can of auto fix-a-flat . Since I am replacing the tire anyway (and I don't have to deal with the mess) why not ?
On the bright side in 30 years (on & off) I have only had to do it twice--not counting dirt bike flats-
I will be the first to admit this is "old school" thinking -maybe today's plugs or repairs can stand up to a hot squirming tire doing 70+ down the highway.
I don't know -don't think it's worth finding out.
Flats are not fun ....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It's easy to reason that if you get a flat on the road, and you aren't carrying a spare and/or the equipment to change a tire/repair a tire with an interior patch, then plugging the puncture is the only option left. Of course you could call AAA, but I wonder if they have a bike service. Lastly you could park the bike and hitch or call for a ride home. Then get the dealer to go get your bike with a trailer.

On the topic of plugs... I assume we are all talking about the typical car-tire plugs used to repair punctures in car tires. It makes me wonder if a new plug could be created (or might already be available) that locks itself in better to withstand the cornering distortions a motorcycle wheel goes through. There are many parallel alternatives...Think of putting a screw in drywall. Most hardware stores have a dozen or so alternative fasteners that expand behind the wall to prevent the screw from pulling out. Surely someone could design a tire plug that would expand like a patch behind the puncture, but could still be inserted THROUGH the puncture like a plug is.

Just me (4D)thinking.

Dave B
 

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I have the Stop & Go kit. It comes with good instructions. I've never had to use it (and I'd prefer that it stays that way). These ARE the "conventional plug" for motorcycle tire repair, and motorcyclists have been using them for years. The kit is a little pricey, but it is very complete. Buy one, throw it in your trunk. Hopefully you won't have to use it either. But it is nice to know it is there - just in case. :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
pauljo said:
These ARE the "conventional plug" for motorcycle tire repair, and motorcyclists have been using them for years.
That's good to know, Paul. The only experiece I have with plugs was when I watched a tire technician repair one of my truck tires. That was 20 years ago, and the plug didn't look anything like those in the link above.

I'm still wanting to hear from anyone whose used them. Hasn't anyone here had a puncture? THAT would be an interesting statistic.
 

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pauljo said:
4DThinker said:
Surely someone could design a tire plug that would expand like a patch behind the puncture, but could still be inserted THROUGH the puncture like a plug is.

Just me (4D)thinking.

Dave B
That is, of course, exactly how the Stop & Go plug kits work. :wink:
Pauljo
Did you get the standard kit or the pocket kit?
 

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Only to get me slowly to where I can get the tire replaced. Better have an air pump, cause it takes a lot of those Co2 bottles.
 
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