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Discussion Starter #1
For those who have actually done it , let say you have one of these CVT blow outs that the dealer wants 3K to fix .
Now lets say you can pick up an entire engine , trans and CVT all in one piece with just a few thousand miles for say
$1,000.00 . My question is how many hours labor involved for a complete R&R ?

Reading through the forum I've read that people with 50,000 miles on their bikes have paid the dealer $2,500 to $3,000
to repair their CVT . That to me sounds a little silly , first off a Burg with 50K on the odometer might only be worth what
3K at the most ? Then if one really wanted to keep that Burg for some reason , picking up a 5,000 mile parts bike or a complete
motor would make more sense .

So the question is how many hours to tear one down drop the motor put a new one it and put it all back together ?

TheReaper!
 

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My rough guess would be around 8 hours shop time if the other drivetrain is ready to drop in but if they are going to have to swap over the final drive a couple hours more. I'm a little leary of used parts. It might make more sense to just swap the CVT if its in good shape.
 

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I would say MHR is in the ball park. I'm pretty sure I could have the power unit out of my bike and sitting on the shop floor in 5 to 6 hours. Install time should be about the same. If your talking about having a shop do it then they should be able to beat those times by an hour or two.

I would agree with him that just swapping the CVT makes sense too. Once you get the power unit out of the bike, removing the CVT from it is a quick and easy job. I would estimate I could pull one CVT off the power unit and install another in 20 minutes or so without even trying very hard.

I think the biggest trick to your plan would be finding a complete low mileage power unit for $1,000. Your best bet for that might be buying a crashed bike at salvage and stripping the parts off yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Buffalo said:
I would say MHR is in the ball park. I'm pretty sure I could have the power unit out of my bike and sitting on the shop floor in 5 to 6 hours. Install time should be about the same. If your talking about having a shop do it then they should be able to beat those times by an hour or two.

I would agree with him that just swapping the CVT makes sense too. Once you get the power unit out of the bike, removing the CVT from it is a quick and easy job. I would estimate I could pull one CVT off the power unit and install another in 20 minutes or so without even trying very hard.

I think the biggest trick to your plan would be finding a complete low mileage power unit for $1,000. Your best bet for that might be buying a crashed bike at salvage and stripping the parts off yourself.

That is exactly what I would do , while I have no experience to date with the Burg I have parted out several bikes .
In my example above the unfortunate person with the 50K miles scooter , IMO was putting good money after bad .
from here out I will be on the look out for a crashed Burg , I can see how a low mileage wreck could be a nice little asset .

Thanks for the input :thumbup:

TheReaper!
 

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If you bought a salvage bike it might be quicker to swap the Tupperware and front wheel assembly..... :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
NormanB said:
If you bought a salvage bike it might be quicker to swap the Tupperware and front wheel assembly..... :wink:

That is a good idea as long as the title and frame are OK , if the title is clouded on ownership or salvage then it's a no go .

TheReaper!
 

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you can undress the 650 in about 3-4 hours.
It will take another 2-3 hours to undo all the plugs/connectors and get the air chambers and throttle assembly out and undo
the engine mount bolts and separate the frame from the engine.

If the replacement engine / rear drive is of the same model year or is one that is compatible with the OEM harness, it will
take another 3-8 hours to put it all back together.

You will need to order engine mount bolts as they are not reusable.

If you have a service manual, go over the addendum sections where they point out all the different changes for the model years,
that way you will know for sure whether it will work or not.

Most CVT parts repair bills will be around $300-400 for a belt and $500-1200 for a new primary pulley, bearings, etc...

I think the tupperware is the same as far mounting and connections go.

The 09+ have a different swing arm in the rear, so pay attention to the calipers / mounts etc...
 

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LeDude said:
You will need to order engine mount bolts as they are not reusable.
Nothing about not reusing the mounting bolts in my service manual. It cautions that the nuts are of a self locking type and should not be reused if the self locking effect has been lost but that is all it says on the subject.
 

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Buffalo said:
Nothing about not reusing the mounting bolts in my service manual. It cautions that the nuts are of a self locking type and should not be reused if the self locking effect has been lost but that is all it says on the subject.
sorry, thanks for catching that, typo on my part, didn't mean the bolts, but the nuts....
 

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When I repaired my friends CVT, I reused the motor mount nuts but I also used blue Loctite to ensure they would not come loose. It has been a year now and nearly 10 K miles and everything is still good. As far as time to do the job, I spent a little over 20 hours and took my time. If I were doing that CVT rebuild again, I think I could do the entire job in 14 or 15 hours not that I want to do it again.
 

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ErikDK said:
Ken said:
... I think I could do the entire job in 14 or 15 hours not that I want to do it again.
Is it such an ordeal?
For me no, I find it quite easy but then again I wrenched on cars professionally.
 

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ErikDK said:
Ken said:
... I think I could do the entire job in 14 or 15 hours not that I want to do it again.
Is it such an ordeal?
I wouldn't call it an ordeal, just time consuming. If mine fails, I will rebuild it. Would I pay a shop $3K plus, probably not.
 

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burgman an400

Restoring a 2007 burgman an400 got the engine out now i need to replace engine any advise on making sure i get a good used engine.
 

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Nothing about not reusing the mounting bolts in my service manual. It cautions that the nuts are of a self locking type and should not be reused if the self locking effect has been lost but that is all it says on the subject.
Honestly...I bet if you used red Loctite on them, you'd be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Now that I've have a little more exposure to the Burgman 650 , I think if you could get your hands on a low mileage wreck your best bet would be to take the entire drive train out of the wreck from the kick stand to the rear wheel . Then put your frame and plastics on it . I think 2 guys could easily do the entire R&R in less than a day . Nice thing about it would be that you wouldn't have to have a whole lot of mechanical experience to do it .


TheReaper!
 

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I agree a couple of guys could do a swap of the entire power train in a day provided at least one of them had separate the power train from the bike before. If not it would probably take them a little longer just for the learning curve factor of figuring out how it all fits together.
 
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