Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

· Registered
2008 AN400
Joined
·
326 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Considering the centrifugal forces at work, if less maintenance is the goal (not fuel economy), from a stop, which would result in less wear on the drivetrain of an AN400?

a) twist throttle open wide with confidence and hold it at 5-6k rpm and wait for the speed to catch up

b) gently and incrementally twist the throttle until you're up to the desired speed


Same question, when decelerating to a stop ahead:

c) run the throttle open and suddenly close it fully to let the scooter coast in idle to a stop (braking as required)

d) gently and incrementally reduce throttle so the scooter avoids coasting at idle (braking as required)
 

· Registered
2014 Burgman 400
Joined
·
1,201 Posts
I concur with A+D for the most part, quickly opening throttle will engage/lock clutch faster, less slip/wear/glazing/heat, even when in city/traffic, then roll back to maintain desired speed, obviously the belt, front and rear pulleys are turning all the time, but there's more stress/tension/heat on belt at higher speeds, so driving at a constant speed (MPH) for long periods of time, can create a wear grooves/ridges on pulley faces (unfortunately common on B400's), making CVT operation less smooth, best to vary cruising speeds to move belt around some. Keep cvt air filter clean and if you are traveling thru sandy areas use a filter medium "foam" at least 40-60 PPI, cut and carry a few extra replacements.
 

· Registered
2008 AN400
Joined
·
326 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, that seems accurate - thanks!

A quick flip of the wrist at start-off feels right, too. And the calculation is it keeps the clutch dragging at minimum.

Decelerating to a stop is less intuitive, as cutting the gas to idle feels right, but keeping the clutch out until absolutely necessary is probably the best way forward.

In the end, the CVT g-forces running the rubber band along the cone is the least of wear and tear, and it's the clutch engaging at idle is where it counts.

Let's see it in practice now :p
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top