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Hey folks, I have read quite a few posts on the forum regarding "blipping" the throttle on the 08 and up 400s to get the clutch to engage before take off. Although I have been riding various bikes for around 10 years, I am not familiar with all the terminology. When someone says "blip", I envision holding the rear brake and opening the throttle until the revs hit the desired point and then releasing the brake and driving off. What I need to know is whether this is the correct technique, or if I should be doing things differently? On my 2005 400, the clutch seemed to engage much sooner so this new bike is my first experience with this sort of situation.

On a related note, I have also done a number of searches and read multiple posts about the DP sliders and their impact on the clutch operation of the bike. Specifically, that certain weights - maybe 18g and 19g - will cause the clutch to engage sooner. I am not a racer and am not looking for a ton of takeoff power from a stop. Just looking to not feel like I am going WOT to get underway. My partner took my 400 out for a quick spin earlier this week. We both had 2005 400s a few years ago so she is somewhat familiar with how those bikes operated. When she gingerly opened the throttle and nothing happened (no forward movement), she started checking to insure the parking brake was not on or something "sticking" and asked me what she was doing wrong. I explained that this one takes a little more throttle to get underway. Since I am not familiar with all the terminology of the clutch (like what exactly the "bell" is) and variator (is that part of the clutch?), I cannot figure out from all the posts whether the lighter sliders will help with this particular issue and which ones are preferred for this purpose.

Thanks in advance for any insight or advise you all can provide. :confused:
 

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When I use the term "blip", I'm just saying twist the throttle quickly to get the rpms up to 4000.

Some riders will try to baby their 400 to keep from hitting that 4000 rpm limit Suzuki put into the break in instructions. Doing it gradually like that only keeps the centrifugal force down so the clutch shoes don't firmly grab that clutch bell.

The clutch pads will actually start engaging at 2800 rpms, but only very gradually. If you're familiar with a drum brake design, the clutch is very similar in my mind. The clutch pads take the place of the brake shoes. The clutch bell is the drum brake housing. In a drum brake, hydraulic pressure from your foot hitting the brake pedal makes the brake pads grab the brake drum. More pressure from your foot, and the brake engages more firmly.

On the clutch, the effect is much the same except we don't use hydraulic pressure to force the clutch pads out. It is all done by centrifugal force. More rpms = more centrifugal force. If you try to baby it by bringing the rpms up only to ...say 3300 rpms...it is like barely engaging your drum brakes on a car. They don't do much to stop you and heat up a lot.

There are two pulleys in a CVT like ours that work in conjunction with each other. The front pulley I call the variator. That's where the weights reside. The rear (or driven) pulley drives the clutch.

I'd try the 19 gram weights in your case. It is what I use. I have plenty of acceleration for around town riding for me, and my rpms drop on the freeway to @ 5300 at 70 mph (indicated).

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the quick and thorough reply, Chris! I was thinking the 19s would be best for me too after reading the forums. The explanation of the clutch system helps too - I thought the front pulley was the "variator" based on Michbergsma's videos, but just wanted to make sure I can correctly identify the parts before I start monkeying with them!

It will be a few weeks before I can order the sliders - an expensive vet visit for our Boston plus replacing 2 bike batteries at once depleted the "mad money" temporarily. :laughing9: But, when I do get ready to break the CVT open, it is awesome to know this forum is here with a ton of information!

Ride safe!
 

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I've seen a couple of posts about DP sliders, especially the 19 gram ones. However, I've not seen what gram the original ones are. I assume the 19s are lighter, but don't know by how much. If I remember correctly, I added lighter DP weights on my old Majesty for a bit faster acceleration. What is the stock slider weight on a 2008 B400 ?
 

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Looking at the service manual it lists, for a 2007 AN400, an engage rpm of between 2,100 to 2,600 rpm. In 2008, along with a different clutch design, the engage rpm was raised from between 2,500 to 3,100. In 2009 Suzuki again changed the engage rpm from between 2,600 to 3,200. The lock up rpm has always been 4,000 to 5,000 so maybe the increasing engage rpm was done to limit the amount of time before reaching lock up and reduce glazing (?).
 

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When I use the term "blip", I'm just saying twist the throttle quickly to get the rpms up to 4000.

I'd try the 19 gram weights in your case. It is what I use. I have plenty of acceleration for around town riding for me, and my rpms drop on the freeway to @ 5300 at 70 mph (indicated).

Chris
Daboo, I find your speed to rpm's hard to believe. Here is a video of 23gr sliders used in a 2007 400-"
and he is turning 5200 rpm's @ 70 mph. No matter what happens with 19gr sliders, they will not turn fewer rpm's at 60 mph or above than 23gr sliders. Show me that I am wrong! A lot of wild claims have been made about the DP sliders over the years, but only Mitch backs it up with video.
 

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Buy me the video camera, and I'll be happy to take your video for you.

In the meantime, since you doubt my integrity...do what you want.

Chris
 

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I am not questioning your integrity, I am questioning your results. Don't get your panties in a bunch, you are just one of many that make the same claim. I have given concrete proof that it is not possible with this series of bikes using the video. Please explain how it is possible. I don't even need a video, just explain how it is possible.
 

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Well last I checked 5300 rpm @ 70 mph indicated is more and not less than 5200 rpm. I have 19 gram dp sliders on my machine and my results are similar to Daboo's. Don't forget qaz, that the width of the belt also has an effect on the gearing of the variator. The effect that the DPS sliders have on engine speed does not appear to be linear.
 

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Why are people "nit picking" and calling each other names.??? For what? A difference of a few 100 RPM more or less..????????

Just enjoy the ride............for God's sake!!!!!!!!! ;)
 

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nit picking

Why are people "nit picking" and calling each other names.??? For what? A difference of a few 100 RPM more or less..????????

Just enjoy the ride............for God's sake!!!!!!!!! ;)

+1.....exactly the reason I don't post much anymore !
 

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While you guys are discussing rpm's, I'm looking at the MPG in the video! In eight years of riding my 05 and 08 AN400's I have rarely approached 60 mpg, let alone 70!!!

I don't see how it's possible. Yet many riders claim it. Go figure.
 

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While you guys are discussing rpm's, I'm looking at the MPG in the video! In eight years of riding my 05 and 08 AN400's I have rarely approached 60 mpg, let alone 70!!!

I don't see how it's possible. Yet many riders claim it. Go figure.
MPG has more to do with how you ride. I kept track of mpg for about 42k miles of the 46k+ miles I rode it. Always filed the same way & if in town fueled at only three different stations. Averaged 64.5 mpg, best was 72.6 lowest was 52.2. No 2-up riding very little true in town stop & go most all two lane 60-65 mpg. Yes I rode on freeway & yes I rode in traffic but as an average it accounted for very little of the 46k miles.
 

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thanks - didn't mean to steal the thread, just wanted note that performance characteristics vary WIDELY by rider, be it speed/rpm or MPG.
 

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Jeff, I regularly get 70mpg and live in the mountains of VA on a stock 2005 400. The key is the right wrist and be easy with it. I also wonder if the higher rpm's that the pre 07 turn help the mpg's.
 
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