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I am considering buying a 2022 400. I used to have a 2007 Burgman 400 and had quite a bit of trouble with the clutch. Eventually I put a DrPulley clutch in it and that was the end of all my clutch problems. Do the new 22's have a good solid engagement with the drivetrain and at what rpm does the clutch engage at? Also how well do they ride or take the bumps under city driving conditions?
You guys seem to know what your talking about and that's why I'm asking.
wbarnier
 

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I am considering buying a 2022 400. I used to have a 2007 Burgman 400 and had quite a bit of trouble with the clutch.
Talking strictly cvt and rear gearbox, some 07 had issues with the 3-shoe clutch and it was upgraded to 5 shoes in 08, in 2011 the "L" series had some changes, different final gearbox ratio, different contra/torque spring and better cvt cooling.
" Otherwise mechanically the cvt and gearbox are virtually the same up to latest model since 2011 ", same part numbers. Most of the changes on 2019+, are to improve drivability and meet emissions, there's a few electronic gadgets, also drawbacks, mainly lack of storage and pre 2019 accessories are not compatible, search for more info and other options, otherwise "New" is "New".

Can comment on suspension, best to read reviews where they compare to previous generation.
 

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I am considering buying a 2022 400. I used to have a 2007 Burgman 400 and had quite a bit of trouble with the clutch. Eventually I put a DrPulley clutch in it and that was the end of all my clutch problems. Do the new 22's have a good solid engagement with the drivetrain and at what rpm does the clutch engage at? Also how well do they ride or take the bumps under city driving conditions?
You guys seem to know what your talking about and that's why I'm asking.
wbarnier
To me, my 2022 400 clutch feels like it engages pretty good around 2500 RPM and is nice and solid by 3000 RPM when accelerating on the street. Seems to slip pretty good under 2500.

I do a lot of slow speed maneuverability drills to hone my skills and regularly run them at 8-12MPH. I have to load the rear brake to keep the bike at that speed under power just to stay at these slow speeds. When doing them, the engine does not sound like it is much over idle.

I am 250lbs. My rear suspension is loaded to the #3 index position. At this position it handles the bumps reasonably well when tires are inflated to factory recommended PSI for one person. No complaints there. The front suspension feels nice, but has a tendency to bottom out easily when hitting some bumps, this includes hitting the 1.5” step-up entrance to most concrete driveways if any front braking is being applied during that maneuver. It is no joy riding it on a poorly maintained road though, but I suspect that is the case for most any bike.

I have about 3800 miles on mine now.


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Yesterday while riding I made an additional observation about the clutch. While slowing gradually from a higher speed (60-50-40-30mph etc.) using engine braking alone, I observed that my clutch (stock) naturally disengages when the RPMs reaches 2000. This would seem to indicate this is also the point where it would first start to engage.


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I am 250lbs. My rear suspension is loaded to the #3 index position. At this position it handles the bumps reasonably well when tires are inflated to factory recommended PSI for one person. No complaints there. The front suspension feels nice, but has a tendency to bottom out easily when hitting some bumps, this includes hitting the 1.5” step-up entrance to most concrete driveways if any front braking is being applied during that maneuver. It is no joy riding it on a poorly maintained road though, but I suspect that is the case for most any bike.
Same weight, same #3 index position (now) PO had it set on #1 Bike is a 650 and I can note identical comments, especially the 1.5" step up driveway entrance, parking lot entrances etc... The first time I pulled into my drive at the same speed and method as I have on my other bikes I'd like to knock my teeth out, yup bottomed out. It did concern me at first then I wrote it off as I'm used to better aftermarket suspensions on large performance motorcycles. The bike is pristine like new with low miles so I doubt it's a service issue, just how it is.
I probably had too many teeth anyway.
 

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To me, my 2022 400 clutch feels like it engages pretty good around 2500 RPM and is nice and solid by 3000 RPM when accelerating on the street. Seems to slip pretty good under 2500.
I observed that my clutch (stock) naturally disengages when the RPMs reaches 2000. This would seem to indicate this is also the point where it would first start to engage.
Your observations kind of mirror/similar to most stock Burgman's 400 and lots of other scooters, the "Clutch In" rpm is always higher than "Clutch Out", as inertia, etc. tend to hold clutch shoes against the bell longer, if you release the throttle suddenly at high speed, without applying brakes, you should see a 2-300 rpm rise when you reach approx. 2000 rpm while decelerating, as the rear wheel is driving the engine for a brief moment. As mileage increases and clutch breaks in those in/out rpm numbers will decrease slightly, which is a good thing. Has been repeated a lot, but decisive/quick initial throttle application, even occasional will help a clutch performance and life, slow driving/traffic is a clutch killer.
 

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the "Clutch In" rpm is always higher than "Clutch Out", as inertia, etc. tend to hold clutch shoes against the bell longer...
...and there is also an elastic relationship between rpm and driven pulley speed (similar to kicking down a gear)
because the CVT adapts to load, and that sprung torque load is present on acceleration but not deceleration
 

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2018 400, now "updated" by the latest model which apparently has "riding modes" - but other than that my burg is the same as the latest model with the exception of a Givi sliding screen.
No complaints - good ride, good MPG, enough storage (with Givi top box), SWMBO prefers it to our last Harley and we use it more as it's so convenient - other than all the body work making servicing laborious - what's not to like?
 

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Your observations kind of mirror/similar to most stock Burgman's 400 and lots of other scooters, the "Clutch In" rpm is always higher than "Clutch Out", as inertia, etc. tend to hold clutch shoes against the bell longer, if you release the throttle suddenly at high speed, without applying brakes, you should see a 2-300 rpm rise when you reach approx. 2000 rpm while decelerating, as the rear wheel is driving the engine for a brief moment. As mileage increases and clutch breaks in those in/out rpm numbers will decrease slightly, which is a good thing. Has been repeated a lot, but decisive/quick initial throttle application, even occasional will help a clutch performance and life, slow driving/traffic is a clutch killer.
SOOO, ride it you stole it? 😁
 

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Talking strictly cvt and rear gearbox, some 07 had issues with the 3-shoe clutch and it was upgraded to 5 shoes in 08, in 2011 the "L" series had some changes, different final gearbox ratio, different contra/torque spring and better cvt cooling.
" Otherwise mechanically the cvt and gearbox are virtually the same up to latest model since 2011 ", same part numbers. Most of the changes on 2019+, are to improve drivability and meet emissions, there's a few electronic gadgets, also drawbacks, mainly lack of storage and pre 2019 accessories are not compatible, search for more info and other options, otherwise "New" is "New".

Can comment on suspension, best to read reviews where they compare to previous generation.
On the 21 miles I have thus far on my 2023 400 is, it's a bit weak on acceleration, but, at 4k rpm it's doing 50 mph, which will make the break in period a bit less arduous..I don't know what roller/slider weights it has, I've seen previous years had 19g weights..I weigh 160 lbs and the factory suspension setting seems a bit stiff to me...
 
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