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Discussion Starter #1
I'm getting my info from these 2 sources:

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
http://motorcycleinfo.calsci.com/index.html#BreakIn

From what I've read, I should totally ignore the factory break-in procedures and listen to the websites above, and they offer convincing proof.
The following is what I've learned after reading both sites:

Before you start:

Buy oil and a filter on day one, use petroleum oil to start, NOT synthetic.
Buy better quality than factory always.

THEN:

1. Idle for about 2 minutes to warm up.
2. Ride normally (up to 2/3 rpm's) for about 10 km's, varying the rpms up and down, do NOT keep a constant speed/rpm.
3. Then turn off the engine for about 5 minutes.
4. Ride varying rpm again for about 10 minutes, then shut bike off for another 5 minutes.
5. Ride the bike hard for about 100 km's, varying the rpm's but revving the hell out of it.
6. Take the bike home and change the oil and filter. Use petroleum oil for first 2500 km's, THEN switch to synthetic.
7. You can ride the bike as normal, but wait until the first 1000 km's (first official oil change/service) to ride for long periods of time at constant speeds.
 

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Here's another really good site to peruse:

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

Someone mentioned on another thread that the RPM limits that the manufacturer gives are more for the rider than the bike. You really shouldn't go out and ride any motorcycle or scooter hard right away unless you're an experienced ride. Many accidents happen because the operater is new to the bike, and isn't accustomed to it.

That said, I got a call this morning that my '05 Burgman 650 was in and ready for pickup. I went in and took care of the paperwork, and rode it home. The salesman didn't give me the Suzuki break-in procedure. He said, "Ride it like you'd normally ride it (speed-wise), but don't hold a steady speed/RPM. Vary it quite a bit during the break-in."

I put 20-30 miles on it in city driving, averaging 35mph, and doing a lot of stopping and starting. I was much more comfortable with the scooter right off the bat than I thought I'd be, so I did a bunch more riding around, and even did some short freeway riding at speeds up to an indicated 75mph. Not bad for the first 85 miles. :wink:

I'd say drive it 'briskly', but only as much as you can do safely.
 

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Pritty much what has been said here on an off, except

# 5 --I agree with the idea, but the wording is a bit strong
#6 is a complete waste of money (I think, how far is 100 km anyway)
Yes do wait at least 4000 miles before switching to synthetic.

But what do I know, I have only 'broken" in 5 bikes in my life, the rest were all used and somehow I doubt the guys I bought them from ever read anything :?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
yeah, changing the oil after only 60 miles seems a bit stupid. I want the most life out of my engine, but honestly, how poorly made must an engine be that there could be that much metal shavings in the oil?

600 miles (1000 km's) seems reasonable to me. It's just that both these sites say you should change the oil after a really short time, and they do seem to know what they're talking about.

If people on this site who've done the factory-recommended break-in and are still getting ample power along with 65 mpg, I can live with that.
 

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I'll just add that oil is a never ending debate on any motorcycle forum you visit. I recently discussed oil for my AN650 with the shop manager and service manager at the dealership I go to. Neither are very impressed with synthetic oils. They both run OEM oil in their personal bikes. They both own Kawasakis. One uses Kawasaki oil, the other prefers the Honda product. They have both seen engines torn down in the shop, and they both say that many times the engines that have run OEM oil look better than those that have been running synthetic. For what it's worth.

Oil preference is like religion. People have "beliefs" and can rarely be swayed from them. As long as the oil meets the basic specs given in the owner's manual, and as long as it is changed on schedule, you will probably not have any issues. I've run semi-synthetic, full synthetic, and OEM oil in various motorcycles. I've never worn out or blown an engine or tranny. I am running full synthetic in my AN650. But I think the next time around, I'll just stick with an OEM dynosaur blend - probably Honda oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The only thing I cared about regarding oil is that I read a post here not long ago that went along the lines of, "when I switched eventually to synthetic oil, my mpg went way up".

It's such an easy thing to do, and why not? It can't hurt. With the info I've read so far, I would be tempted to change to synthetic after about 3000 miles or so. Maybe I'll change my mind. Either way, I'll change the oil often and look after the bike, that's the main thing.
 

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Darcy said:
yeah, changing the oil after only 60 miles seems a bit stupid. I want the most life out of my engine, but honestly, how poorly made must an engine be that there could be that much metal shavings in the oil?
Exactly. And the thing is -- that's what the oil filter is FOR. It's supposed to take those metal shavings and trap them before they get recirculated back through the engine. The oil that gets sent back to the engine is clean and has no more shavings. And when you think about it, the initial break-in shavings will be larger than any later ones -- all the easier for the oil filter to catch them.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
a clip from one of the sites:

Q: Why change the oil at 20 miles ?? Doesn't the oil pick up
screen catch the aluminum bits ???

A: It's true that the screen stops the big pieces, but many areas of the engine aren't within the oil filtration system. The oil that is splashed around will circulate metal debris to the lubricated bearing surfaces. For example, transmission gears and their ball bearings are unprotected by the filtration system, and even the cam chain makes a perfect "conveyer belt" to
bring metal debris up into the cylinder head !!

A close examination of a new engine will reveal lots of aluminum deposits on steel parts. This aluminum coats and tightens
up the clearances of the parts, which creates a loss of power. Most of the time I spend "blueprinting"
an engine is actually inspecting every part and "de-aluminizing" them !!

I prefer to remove the oil pan and clean the aluminum bits out of a new engine out that way, but a $20 oil change
is an easy and inexpensive way to flush the initial particles that come loose in the first miles.
 

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On my 2003 Suzuki V-Strom 1000cc motorcycle, I did notice smoother shifting of the manual gearbox when I went to full synthetic. I did not notice any significant increase in mpg. On my 2003 Burgman 650 I really noticed nothing when I switched to the same full synthetic. Certainly no increase in mpg.
 

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Also remember that you are breaking in a new set of tires on a new bike. You should be careful for the first 100 miles or so with hard acceleration, braking, and cornering.
 

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Well I agree with the hard break in method personally. What you may want to consider or think about is if you are a long term vehicle owner or change after a few years. I tend to keep my vehicles around 10 years or so. If I think changing the oil at 60 miles will help in the long run then thats what I do/did. It's not going to hurt and in the long run the small amount of money laid out now I believe will pay off.
 

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Transition

Directed towards (frugality)

What did you make the transition from (bike/scooter)?

I am trying to figure if the Bergamn 650 would be for me. I had a GSXR 2001, 600. I want something more to cruise around (poconos, Canada, etc) and yet has space(storage), for mostly site riding and coffee stops.
 

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wgolpe wrote, (snipped)
Directed towards (frugality)

What did you make the transition from (bike/scooter)?
If I may :) I just sold my 1200cc cruiser, kept it 8 months after I bought my scoot, just did not use it anymore.
In town stop & go got to be to much , pushing it in & out of parking spots also was a pain, but on the highway it was a dream. Never gave much thought to selling it, bought a scooter for local so I got the 400, liked the looks of it. Long story short, went to San Antonio (208 miles) by more or less accident on the 400, what an eye opener, 83 (indicated) all the way never missed a beat, and while it was no Goldwing ride it was as good as my BMW. I can only guess at what at 650 could do and if any of my trips were longer then 300 miles I mite look into one. Bottom line. 13 months 21800. miles, ( that's not stop & go riding) I am still happy.
Just thought that mite help besides what " frugality" will add :)
 

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Re: Transition

wgolpe said:
Directed towards (frugality)

What did you make the transition from (bike/scooter)?
I only learned to ride last year; took the MSF class and bought a 1990 Honda Hawk 650 from a coworker. It was a great bike to learn on and had that sexy V-twin rumble, but I needed something more light-touring oriented, because I like doing a lot of 'Sunday driving'.

Today is only day #2 for me on the 650 Burgman, and I LOVE it! I went for a great ride with 'ekp' (Eric) and even ran into another forum member, 'Blueburg of Happiness' (Steve), who I met for the first time. The scooter is just amazing. The 650's got plenty of power and handles like a dream. The wheels are a little smaller than a standard motorcycle, so you have less of the gyroscopic effect that tends to keep you going straight. This makes avoidance maneuvers easier. I can avoid a pothole much more quickly on the scoot than a motorcycle. Yet it doesn't feel at all 'twitch', just more responsive. Sitting upright is very different than the sport-bike position on the Hawk, and it's definitely much more comfortable.

The storage space was the big driving factor in going to the scooter. It's great being able to stuff my helmet and armored riding jacket under the seat with a bit more room to spare. When I get more adventurous this summer, it'll hold my tent, sleeping bag, and clothes. The trunk will also come in handy for commuting to work and bringing office casual pants and shoes to change into from my jeans and hiking boots.

I actually didn't need an automatic transmission, and actually I kind of like to shift. My car is a stick. But it's definitely nice not having to worry whether you're in the right gear, because with the CVT you're always in the right gear.

Hope that helps. It seems you're looking to do more 'adventurous' riding since you mentioned the Poconos and Canada, so if you can swing it financially, I'd recommend the 650. It really is a mini Goldwing, but more sporty.
 

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Cost, Comfort, ESP PLAN

As for the cost, the total for the 650 was 8854.00 with 552 tacked on for a 48 month Extended service plan.
it broke down to
Bike 7650 (a whopping 150 off the MSRP , Im not impressed :)
Tax 459 (at NJ's wonderful 3%)
ESP 552 (48 months, wonder if thats 48 more or including the initial 12)
Doc fee 45
DMV 148

(I wonder what the going rate is across the board, didnt seem to bad for bumper to bumper coverage so to speak).

I put a down payment on the 650 Friday, and between now and Tuesday I am decideing if the bike will be for me. I was thinking of a Hayabusa as they are comfortable, so it is said, but I cant really tell sitting on one in the dealership if I will find it comfortable or not, when actually riding it.

I sat on the 650 too. Aside from the bike to scooter transition issues, I really need to weight the pros and cons. The initial pro is I will save about 3000 on the 650 compared to a Busa, the con is the signifigant other wont be very comfortable, but I really dont see me and her riding as much as me soloing.......

Decisions, Decision....478 pounds for the busa, 524 on the 650, and my old bike an 01 Gsxr was only about 357 so there will be a noticiable 1 to 2 hundred pound difference.

Heres a last question, is the bergman a pretty easy bike to manuver, aside from riding it, more from the pushing it back or parking it type situations?
 

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the Burgman 650 is basically an automatic sportbike, it is very manuverable and pretty fast too. ( had mine up to 110 indicated with my wife on the back and fully loaded topbox and underseat going to Branson, MO, bike had more to give but wife didn't, she started beating on my back yelling slow down) get the Burgman, you won't be sorry.
 

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gunrun69 said:
the Burgman 650 is basically an automatic sportbike, it is very manuverable and pretty fast too. ( had mine up to 110 indicated with my wife on the back and fully loaded topbox and underseat going to Branson, MO, bike had more to give but wife didn't, she started beating on my back yelling slow down) get the Burgman, you won't be sorry.
I think we can sometimes get carried away on these characterizations of the Burgman. In particular, it's nothing like a sportbike.

1) It's way too slow. Yes, it's peppy for what it is. It's certainly not sportbike-fast or sportbike-quick.

2) It's got too little ground clearance.

3) It's got a pretty mediocre suspension. The rear can be somewhat fixed, though the shock adjustability options tend to be limited for the 650. The front end will always be a compromise.

4) It's got a long wheelbase. It does pretty well with it, but it sure isn't like a modern sportbike.

Of course, it's not meant to be any of those things. I came to it from a BMW K1200RS and a Triumph Sprint ST. Each of those, with bags, has as much or more (in the case of the Sprint) cargo capacity as the Burgman and is much, much faster. But even those are nothing like a modern sportbike.

None of which is meant to diminish the 650. I love mine, much more than I thought. I'm thinking of letting the Sprint go, just because it doesn't get used and it doesn't make sense to keep it around, paying insurance on it. The 650's been a great commuter for the 2.5 months I've had it. It handles relatively nicely. It does much better at slow speeds than people (who were coming, I imagine, from smaller scooters and not equally heavy sport-touring motorcycles) suggested, and it's got a tiny little turning radius. It can certainly be taken out to putter around, and it provides a convenient place to put your gear.

I don't mean to suggest that that's the limit of it abilities. Obviously, it's got the wherewithal to tour effectively. It can be reasonably sporty, and I'm quite sure I can still beat out some of my friends, owing to the "it's not the bike, it's the rider" doctrine. But those who were better than I will gain more distance now.

All of which is a long way of saying the Burgman 650 is a fine machine. A sportbike it ain't.

Greg
 

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forthguy said:
I think we can sometimes get carried away on these characterizations of the Burgman. In particular, it's nothing like a sportbike.
Yeah, just like some people call golf a sport. :roll: Golf isn't a sport. Mark Twain referred to it as, "A good walk, spoiled." Football or baseball is a sport.

However, the Burgman 650 is pretty sporty for a scooter.
 

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Re: Cost, Comfort, ESP PLAN

wgolpe said:
The initial pro is I will save about 3000 on the 650 compared to a Busa, the con is the signifigant other wont be very comfortable, but I really dont see me and her riding as much as me soloing.......

quote]

You've got to be kidding. :roll: The passinger seat on the 650 and the 400 is way more comfortable than most bikes. My wife loves it. :wink:
 

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Hi wgolpe


You really have a difficult one there - the BUSA and the Lardy. The BUSA is a real hairy arsed bikers machine neither of the BUrgman are! :wink:

The only thing they have in common is the manufacturer.

Seriously - if you ain't going to be hauling a passenger I would look very carefully at the 400 - it may well fit the bill and save you $$$$.
 
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