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Discussion Starter #1
Hoping Norm or somebody can answer this one. :?:

What exactly happens when you push the "power" button?

I don't mean what is the reaction, I mean mechanically.

Does the 650 get Malossi-ized in effect?
Is there an adjustble variator in the sexy beast?

Just curious :?
 

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Power Button

When You use the power button it changes the front pulley to open up and efectivly lower the gear ratio lower making it feel that it has more power. The same thing happens when you change to the manuel mode
1st gear is the same position as power mode from a start.
 

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From a previous post


I use Normal Mode 99% of the time. It typically keeps the RPM around 4,000 RPM in cruse shifting at about 4,500. On heavier acceleration it shifts between 5,000 & 6,000 RPM.

Power mode cruses at about 5,000 RPM and on heaver acceleration it shifts between 6,500 and 8,000 RPM. usefull when keeping the RPM's up going into the twisties or passing.

like magyver stated, basically it just lowers the gear ratio.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Keeping the revs up

Jim said:
From a previous post
Power mode cruises at about 5,000 RPM and on heaver acceleration it shifts between 6,500 and 8,000 RPM. usefull when keeping the RPM's up going into the twisties or passing.

like magyver stated, basically it just lowers the gear ratio.
Thanks Jim.

Which now gives my feverish Burgman sotted "yearning to know everything about it" brain another question.

When we take the safety course, for some reason they need us to zig zag slowly through a pylon course. (To prove we can handle and control our steeds I suppose).

I have also read (at this moment it's all I can do is read) :wink:, that the Burg sort of shifts into neutral below 17 to 10 KMH.

The trick I read about was to "keep the revs up" and the left brake on to control things, much like we used to do with the clutch and the throttle and the footbrake in the old days.

To the point :roll:

Would it be beneficial to use the power button for this exercise, since the "gearing" is lower?

Do you suppose I will know how to make this Burg sing and dance by the time I get my leg over it in the spring?
I'm visualizing the hell out out of it! Works for atheletes :wink:

Pretty sure I can keep the shiny side up, based on my riding experience of 100 years ago (some things you don't forget), but I don't want to leave anything to chance.
 

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For me I found if you carry a little throttle on deceleration, and cover the rear brake, just a bit, you will get a smoother transition to a stop. it also works for slow (walking) speeds. At those speeds I don't think it really matters to much if your in power mode or drive mode. 1st gear is still 1st gear regardless which mode your in.

I find mine goes to neutral between 9 and 12 mph, carring a bit of power and using ther rear brake to slow down, helps to keep in engauged and more predictable. You only need a very small amount of throttle.

It is not done that often, so I don't worry about using up the rear brake. It acts similar to feathering a clutch on a manual transmission.
 

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I took Indiana's motorcycle endorsement test this summer, one part of which is the pylon maneuver. You have several yards to bring the bike up to 10 MPH or so, and then you maneuver the pylons. It's more difficult than it sounds because the pylons are different distances apart, so establishing a rhythm doesn't work. I had done a good amount of practicing in parking lots, but was caught unawares by the pylons being different lengths apart.

Fortunately, I had arrived early, and was able to go through the course several times (with several failures!!!) before I finally was able to start getting through. I don't make it a habit to underestimate anything, but I had underestimated the difficulty of this. However, I had enough practice that by the time I took the test I aced the pylon course, and ultimately got my endorsement.

To relate to the question, I didn't have a problem with engagement/disengagement of the trans... I coasted through the pylon course. It's so close together you can't go any faster. I've learned how to roll just enough of the throttle on in slow speed maneuvers that engagement/disengagement at slow speeds is nearly imperceptible.

I felt kind of lucky... the first guy to take the test that day dropped his bike; and he had a bumblebee yellow fully dressed Harley. Ouch.

WLB :>)
 

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Re: Keeping the revs up

lilleyen said:
...What exactly happens when you push the "power" button?
Essentially, all that happens is that the ratio of RPM to speed is increased by 1000RPM; it's like delaying shifting on a manual transmission to stay higher in the "power band."

lilleyen said:
...When we take the safety course, for some reason they need us to zig zag slowly through a pylon course. (To prove we can handle and control our steeds I suppose)....Would it be beneficial to use the power button for this exercise, since the "gearing" is lower?
At low speeds there isn't much of a difference, but there is some. Acceleration and engine braking will both be slightly stronger, which could actually be a detriment to smoothly negotiating the pylons.

I've used two methods for low-speed handling; both worked, but differently. 1) Keep a little power on and ride the brakes to control speed. 2) Don't ride the brakes, and blip the throttle as needed to keep from tipping (jerkier, but works well).

The best bet is to get some practice in before taking the test. Or, take the Motorcycle Safety Foundation course; many states waive the test if you pass the course -- just take in your completion card when you apply for your license/endorsement.
 

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Hi Rick! It's no problem - just a little throttle and a slight drag on the rear brake is the best way to control your speed during real slow riding.
In your post you commented on the slow weave that it is "...to prove we can handle and control our steeds I suppose". You're right. Anyone can ride a motorcycle (or scooter) at speed. It's the sloooow riding that shows how well a rider can (or can't) handle a bike.
Don
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Don,
I'll take the course in April on their bikes.
Then I have 18 months to 5 years (min and max), to practice for the big test!
Think I'll invest in some pylons and work on that part of it, until I'm confident, then schedule my test.
 

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Hi Rick

I can see you are chomping at the bit to get astride the lardy and master the control bit.

Can I just say - taking time out in a supermarket car park (at quiet times)to practice slow speed turns and emergency stops is very worth while.

I am chomping at the bit too!! :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hi Norm,
Thanks, sounds like good advice.
As soon as I get the feel of the thing, so I won't drop it, I intend to do just that, practice I mean not drop it!
Got to get comfortable with the throttle/brake thing, at walking speeds, in a straight line first.

I can imagine you are getting antsy too.
Have you taken delivery of your lardy yet?
Is the weather conducive?
If not, you can park it in your spotless garage (I've seen the pictures), and play with it anyway. :wink:
 

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lilleyen said:
Hi Norm,
snipped
I can imagine you are getting antsy too.
Have you taken delivery of your lardy yet?
Is the weather conducive?
If not, you can park it in your spotless garage (I've seen the pictures), and play with it anyway. :wink:
Hi Rick
The dealer from whom I am buying opens on Thursday after what seems like an extended holiday closure (Clearly business is good!). So I will be talking delivery dates then - too far, too cold and too much salt to risk a new bike. :)
The first job when I get it in the garage will be to 'get it naked' so I can do a few modifications.
BTW my garage is not always spotless and gets trashed every time I work in there. :cry:
 
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