Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,536 Posts
I have given up raising my bike onto its main stand after ALWAYS struggling to do it for these last 3 years (and incorporating a ham-string injury because of it in the process). Recently, I have been reassessing the design of this thing and came to the conclusion that the there is not enough leverage and that the process would (maybe?) be much easier if the lever part was heated up and bent a few inches further back and closer to the back wheel. Has anyone out there a spare stand (and the time) with which to experiment?

BTW please don't answer with :
(1) I have no problem with it!
(2) Teresa, who weighs in at about 80 lbs can do it almost bare-footed on Youtube! (and any variants of a similar ilk).
I would like a serious discussion about this problem preferably by fellow engineers. :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,204 Posts
Someone suggested rolling the rear tire up on a 2X4 before putting it on the stand. Sounds like a good idea to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
739 Posts
I agree.. THere is something wierd about the design that makes it so blasted hard.. Ican doit, but dread it every time I feel that it's time to check the oil..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Technique... pure and simple. Very little upper body strength at all is needed nor used, instead it is more a 'planted' push down through the pelvis, and quads into the lower limb to the foot. It feels very much like the upward movement of a squat raise, or the pressing movement when using/preforming an incline leg press - for those that are familiar with weight training/body building. Making sure initially that both sides of the centre-stand are making contact with the surface below the scoot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,536 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I was thinking that you could achieve the same results just by shorting the stand 3/8 - 1/2 inch.
I too had thought of that, but it would mean cutting at the stand-feet and welding it back together - which involves much more work than my heating and bending idea.

The "technique pure and simple" reply is of no use whatsoever. I have had 40+ bikes in my lifetime and this is the only one that I have had trouble with regarding the main stand. IT IS BADLY DESIGNED. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
438 Posts
I too had thought of that, but it would mean cutting at the stand-feet and welding it back together - which involves much more work than my heating and bending idea.

The "technique pure and simple" reply is of no use whatsoever. I have had 40+ bikes in my lifetime and this is the only one that I have had trouble with regarding the main stand. IT IS BADLY DESIGNED. :)
The stand needs to be that high so that the rear tire can be removed at the side of the road. Bear in mind that the Burgman weighs 650 lbs and not many bikes of that bulk even have center stands.

The "technique, pure and simple" is what you're lacking. I'm scrawny, and can put a 650 on and off its stand without difficulty. Stand facing it, sorta, behind the stand. Grab the front handlebar with your left hand and put the stand down with your foot. Make sure the stand is square on the floor. Steady the bike, grab the siderail and step on the the stand, down with your foot and back with the rest of you. The bike comes up easy. I've two of them to heave around, so I know.

It comes off just as easily --- same approach, hold the brake on, grab the siderail and gently pull it forward. Make sure the side stand is down (ahem). The bike will come down and stop, then lean over onto the sidestand.

When I first got the bike, I hated the center stand. I though it was useless until I learned how to use it. Shop rates here are silly, so I do my own work, including replacing tires. The 650 eats rear tires and we have two of them, so I appreciate it now. YMMV.

Regards
Scott Fraser
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
739 Posts
Scott.. per the OP.. He didn't want anyone to say how they have no problem with it.. you broke the rule ! Inevitable.. Glad it's easy for you.. I do exactly as you say and it's far from easy.. seems as though the design could be improved.. I Had an MP3 500 that wasn't light and it was easy to put up on the centerstand.. In fact, there was no side stand.. as the 2 front wheels could be locked and it would be fine unless you didn't put the handbrake on and it would roll away..THe issue I have is that when I put all of my weight on the lever, the bike feels as though it's falling over to the right side.. That happened to me once so now I horse it up but cannot bring myself to put all of my weight and commitment on the lever to get it on the stand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
I am sure you have tried a lot of different techniqes. I would like to offer one. Make sure you have a hard sole shoe or boot on, Grab the rear hand grips and stiffen you arm straight, Push the center stand down until you feel it touch the floor. Keep your left leg straight and push down and lift the scooter with your right leg, rocking it backwards on the stand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
739 Posts
Look below on the similar threads .. the OP has had a lot of help with technique.. His question is about the design..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I find the bike "ok" to get on the center stand. But the the Burgy is heavy. Getting it off the side stand is the problem for me. Especially in my garage on a polished concrete floor.

When I try pulling the bike forward the center stand slides with the weight of the bike. The stand might be too high, but I believe the fault lies in the pads on the two legs. Other bikes I have owned with center stands have pads that were more "rolled" to facilitate rocking the bike up onto and off the center stand. IMHO I believe these pads prevent the stand from rocking in either direction easily.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,536 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
The issue I have is that when I put all of my weight on the lever, the bike feels as though it's falling over to the right side.. That happened to me once so now I horse it up but cannot bring myself to put all of my weight and commitment on the lever to get it on the stand.
Yes Noth + drz charlie, that is certainly a big part of what I suggest are design errors. I think that the stand feet would benefit from an increase in area and curvature. This would make the bike feel much more solid whilst levelling it up and the larger curvature area would help tremendously in the process of rolling it back. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
515 Posts
I looked at my main stand and am not sure where you would/could bend it to gain any real leverage advantage.
Also , would bending it cause it to become weak in that point ?

Since mine is usually parked on the side stand and using the main stand is a bit of a PITA I plan to use a piece of 3/4" plywood under the rear when i need to deploy the stand.

I had a similar problem on a BMW that I lowered an inch , by using the plywood it solved the problem. Oh yea, I found that beveling the edges of the plywood on a 45 degree angle helped when rolling the bike up and then off .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,536 Posts
Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I have just carried out an experiment regarding the leverage of the main stand. I slotted a 10" pipe wrench onto the stand lever, put my foot on the wrench handle and the bike rose up very easily and would have been fully up but for the fact that the wrench touched the floor at the crucial point. Of course, the mechanical advantage of such a large extension is obvious, but I am now certain that a carefully calculated bend in the existing lever would do the trick, as would a piece of suitably bent (2"?) diameter steam pipe placed as far as possible over the whole main stand lever. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,536 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I have just carried out an experiment regarding the leverage of the main stand. I slotted a 10" pipe wrench onto the stand lever, put my foot on the wrench handle and the bike rose up very easily and would have been fully up but for the fact that the wrench touched the floor at the crucial point. Of course, the mechanical advantage of such a large extension is obvious, but I am now certain that a carefully calculated bend in the existing lever would do the trick, as would a piece of suitably bent (2"?) diameter steam pipe placed as far as possible over the whole main stand lever.
I have now had time to peruse this problem in some depth and have come up with a new idea which doesn't incorporate bending the lever nor using a length of steam pipe. I shall shortly relate the results on here. Watch this space! ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
438 Posts
Scott.. per the OP.. He didn't want anyone to say how they have no problem with it.. you broke the rule ! Inevitable.. Glad it's easy for you.. I do exactly as you say and it's far from easy.. seems as though the design could be improved.. I Had an MP3 500 that wasn't light and it was easy to put up on the centerstand.. In fact, there was no side stand.. as the 2 front wheels could be locked and it would be fine unless you didn't put the handbrake on and it would roll away..THe issue I have is that when I put all of my weight on the lever, the bike feels as though it's falling over to the right side.. That happened to me once so now I horse it up but cannot bring myself to put all of my weight and commitment on the lever to get it on the stand.
The 650 is big and fat and must be handled with care. It is most important that the stand be firmly in contact with the ground before heaving the thing up. Coming down, pull the hanldlebars left and with the brakek locked, the bike will fall naturally to the left when the wheel hits the ground. It's all technique.

That is not to say that the center stand could not be easier to use. I'm sure it's possible, just a matter of engineering. There are many ways that the Burgman, as good as it is, could be improved. There are even whole threads devoted to that topic.

Regarding the center stand, as I see it, it is easier to learn how to heave the Beast up and bring it down safely that it is to devote time and money into trying to building a better mousetrap. There are better projects to concern a person, like designing a bulletproof fuel filler cover or moving the AC adaptor to where it can be used or fixing the problem with the starter switch or rectifier or CVT bolt. Meh! Don't get me going!

Warts and all, the Burgman is still an awesome machine. There is lots of discussion about the new BMW scooters and they may as good as some claim. Myself, I've owned enough motorcycles to know that each one of them has brainfart design features. You live with them, or you sell the bike.

Regards
Scott Fraser
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,536 Posts
Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
There are better projects to concern a person, like (1) designing a bulletproof fuel filler cover or (2)moving the AC adaptor to where it can be used or (3) fixing the problem with the starter switch or (4)rectifier or CVT bolt. Myself, I've owned enough motorcycles to know that each one of them has brainfart design features. (5)You live with them, or you sell the bike.
Regards, Scott Fraser
I have already remedied the problems with items 1,2,3 and 4. As for item No 5, I intend to do neither of the two options you suggest and I will, indeed, eventually design a better mousetrap. I add the following words of wisdom:
If you think you are beaten, you are
If you think you dare not, you don’t
If you’d like to win, but think you can’t
It’s almost certain you won’t.
If you think you’ll lose, you’ve lost
For out of the world we find
Success begins with a fellow’s will,
It’s all in the state of mind.
If you think you’re outclassed, you are
You’ve got to think high to rise
You’ve got to be sure of yourself before
You can ever win a prize.
Lif’s battles don’t always go
To the stronger or faster man
But sooner or later the man who wins
Is the one who thinks he can.
ANONYMOUS :p
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top