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I've got 1300 miles on my 650 Burgman. I am considering doing some touring on the bike and want some opinions on it's capabilities as a tourer.
I'm hoping this bike will be able to put on some serious miles without much trouble as long as I maintain it properly. Anyone out there with high milers or touring experience that can give some pointers? Thanks
 

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There's tons of "touring experience" in the Road Stories forum.
 

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My 650 will be rolling past the 13,000 mile mark today! I did 3 tours on it this past Summer. All involved 500 mile days and sustained cruising speeds of 80 mph (indicated). You kinda have to do that to get anywhere interesting from Omaha... The only downside was that gas mileage dropped to about 40 mph when loaded for touring and cruising at 75-80 mph. No reliability issues whatsoever, but I did carry a service manual with me just in case.

We have several folks who have toured longer distances than I did. One fellow has over 18,000 miles on his 650 now, and if I recall, he did a tour that was over 5,000 miles.

The Burgman 650 definitely qualifies as a sport tourer.
 

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I'm just approaching 20,000 kms on mine for this season. The only problems I had were wheel bearings that needed replacement. I've spent up to 5 hours in the saddle at one time with no regrets. It definetely classifies as a tourer. As a matter of fact last year Cycle Canada did an issue dedicated to touring bikes and the Burgman was included in its list.
 

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While I haven't been on any long trips, I have put almost 3000 miles on my AN650 since I got it this summer. One was a day trip of a couple hundred miles. A good bit of my miles have been high-speed highway miles, some on interstate.

I have had absolutely no problems whatsoever. The bike always runs like a top. I was concerned about reliability when I got the bike, but it's been totally reliable up to now. I'd have no hesitiation at this point taking it wherever I wanted to go.

WLB :)
 

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I don't think you have anything to worry about with your 650, I just turned 14,300 on my 400 and still going strong .
And the 650 is the real work horse of the family. :lol:
 

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Touring

I find that touring take some getting used to. We don't typically
ride for 8 hours a day. So, I recommend starting off with shorter
distances until you get the calluses on your behind.

I've found that doing a day trip before hand will really tell you
if the ergos are right on your bike. This is a much better way to
"test" your ergos before taking a multi day ride.

Check out the old veterans. Typically, they will have their
camel packs (water), radios (Mini disk player or walkman) and clothing sorted out before the ride.

On one practice over nighter, my group came home and tossed out
much of the stuff we packed and went in search of better (needed) items.
I greatly attribute this over nighter to the success of our following, 3
week trip.

So, in summary, I would direct your attention to the rider and equipment, not so much
the bike. I've seen 70s vintage honda 350s on the road. The pile of
duffle bags eclipsed the bike, the tires were so worn that a roll of
duct was used every day to wrap the tires. The engine bled a
pint of oil over night in the camp ground. The enthusiastic rider still rolled out of the camp ground the next day.
 

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Craig, I have not done any touring yet but hope to do so in the spring. What necessities are needed for an overnight or a 2 or 3-day road trip. For those of us who live and tour along the coast, rain gear or waterproof clothing is a necessity. I was thinking the essentials would be a spare pair of jeans, stockings, underwear, T-shirt(s), toothbrush etc. & my camera.

Cheers Al
 

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alburg,
I pack as if I'm going on an airplane, carry on only. (2 people)

My hump bag carries
extra bunge cords
air compressor
tire repair kit
maps
2-water bottles
1 lightweight rain suit
small flashlight
small roll electric tape or duct tape

The Saddlebags
personal stuff (carry on luggage)

Under the seat
binoculars
camera
additional gear and clothes for unplanned weather
extra rain suit
both helmets (when parked)
both leather jackets (when parked)
a small towel

whatever you want as extra space

The front storage
wallet
phone
maps
gloves
a very clean rag
a med clean rag

I do it this way so if it's not an over niter I don't take the saddlebags.
Shorter day trips the Hump bag stays home.

It's faster for loading for me

Your list may vary but there is plenty of room.

Me and my wife did a 1,200 mile 5-6 day this summer, 300 miles in the rain. We plan on it again next summer.
 

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Jim, thanks for the information. It appears that you have everything you need for a comfortable trip. I had not given any thought to an air compressor & tire repair kit. What size is the air compressor and what type of tire repair kit have you purchased?

Cheers Al
 

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Equipment list

This site has a pretty good list.

http://members.aol.com/EasyReaderTG/thelist.html

It really depends on whether you're staying in hotels, or
camping and cooking over a stove. Typically, I would camp
two nights and hotel one.

One thing that will really help are those over the passenger seat
duffle bags. They will hold a lot and are quick to put on and take
off the bike. Water proof duffles are a plus.

I remember back on my long rides, we typically got up,
broke camp and had some coffee. We rode till we found a town with
a busy diner. Pay attention. The tourists will be at one diner and the
trucks at another. Always go where your trucks are.

After eating, we would ride and site see until around 4 PM. Then,
we would start looking for places to camp. Sometimes we found
one quick, sometimes late. After setting up camp, we made dinner,
our second meal of the day. It didn't seem like we needed the
3 squares that normal people needed. We may have been snacking
along the way.

Finding a camp site takes time and it pays to start looking early.
If you get in early, relax, you probably need the rest anyway.
 

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Here is a thread on inflators, http://burgmanusa.com/forums/viewtopic. ... compressor

or go to search "compressor"

There are co2 type and 12V type.

I have and older 12V unit, don't even know the brand, but they can be had pretty cheap $10 - $40 bucks.

The tire repair kit (smaller the better), is about $3, odds are you will never need it, unless you don't have it.
 

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Jim said:
alburg,
I pack as if I'm giong on an airplane, carry on only. (2 people)

[snipped]
I do it this way so if it's not an over niter I don't take the saddlebags.
Shorter day trips the Hump bag stays home.

It's faster for loading for me

Your list may vary but there is plenty of room.

Me and my wife did a 1,200 mile 5-6 day this summer, 300 miles in the rain. We plan on it again next summer.
Now that is what I call organised! I like the bit which involves planning to ride in the rain - thats real easy here :wink:
 

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dabimf said:
...I am considering doing some touring on the bike and want some opinions on it's capabilities as a tourer.
This past summer I rode (solo) from the Canadian Border in British Columbia to the Mexican Border at Tijuana and back home -- a distance of over 3,000 in 10 days total, 6 actual riding days (I stayed in San Diego for 2 days and at Disneyland for 2). All but 2 of those riding days were over 500 miles.

The scooter ran flawlessly the whole time; from desert heat, to high mountains, to cool and damp along the Oregon coast it just kept humming along.

I stayed in motels the whole time and rode on major highways, so I packed fairly light. Everything fit under the seat except the tripod for my camera (which got stolen on the way down -- should have carried it into the theater with me).

Under the seat I had:

5 shirts
3 slacks
10 undershorts
10 pair socks
1 blue blazer
2 ties
2 pair dress shoes
shaving/hygiene kit
cold weather jacket
2-piece rain suit

1 qt oil
1 liter water
small can Honda spray cleaner/polish
assorted small towels and rags
Service manual

In the glove boxes I had:

Legal documents
Owner's manual
Compact camera
extra film
sun glasses
sun block

I should have had:

Tire repair kit and pump/compressor (never needed it, but as a former Boy Scout I like to "Be Prepared")

Extra fuel in exterior bottles (almost needed it -- too close for comfort when I missed a planned stop in Bakersfield)

By the end of the trip I was wondering why I'd put myself through it (small tires equals more vibration, riding isn't as comfortable as driving, etc.), but within a week I was already planning to do it again next summer -- only I'll take more time and go even more miles!

The one "must have" accessory I would recommend if you're going to ride more than an hour or two at a time is a "Throttle Rocker" to take some of the pressure off your right-hand fingers. A throttle lock or a true cruise control would be good, but the Throttle Rocker did the trick for me. The one long ride I did before installing the TR was, literally, a pain. Getting it was the best $10.00 I've spent.

Yeah, the Burgman's touring capabilites are good. It's not a Gold Wing, but it suits me just fine.
 

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vfdcaptain said:
Brian, did you vacu-pack your clothes, fold them or roll them up?

Still waiting for the story of your trip (& pictures). :)
Interesting topic. I still fold my clothes. The accessories manager at my dealer is an avid rider, and he swears by the "roll them up" approach - says they take up less room that way. I can only imagine what you are referring to as "vacu-pack".

I hope we get some assorted feedback on this.
 

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I roll my clothes, faster and less wrinkles. My wife says I'm to lazy to fold them, she's right.

"Space Bags" as seen on TV
Vacume pac, I think is something that requires a vacume cleaner, or pump. You put them in a bag and suck the air out.
 

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You put them in a bag and suck the air out.
That's correct. You can pack an amazing amount of clothes in a small space. Everything stays nice and dry also. :) Usually a small pump (12v or 110v) that will blow up an air mattress, will also extract air from the space bag. Or you can just roll the bag up tightly and close the port.
 
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