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I read this today in Cycle World and I wanted to forward it to the rest of us out there...it make perfect sense and has science behind it.

The Brake Light Initiative
A treatise on bike control, from the author of The Pace.

The Pace 2.0 challenges riders to add this statement to their riding portfolio: “I can go to the brakes at any time during my ride.” The Brake Light Initiative (BLI) will take this challenge much further as I illustrate that a rider’s ability to use the brakes anywhere, anytime will significantly improve his or her riding.

Each and every brake application begins with the first movement of a brake lever or pedal, typically the point where the brake light flashes on, and that initial squeeze begins the forward weight transfer to load the fork springs and front tire. This initial squeeze can happen relatively quickly, but it shouldn’t happen abruptly. Big difference.

If grip is good, meaning you aren’t leaned over very far and the pavement is solid, warm, and dry, you can continue to add lever or pedal pressure and aggressively reduce your bike’s speed. But someday you’ll find yourself on a gravel road or in the sleet on the commute home, and the only braking forces the tires can handle at that point is just enough lever or pedal pressure to light up the brake light. Let’s say the cold, wet tire will only handle 4 percent of a bike’s total braking ability. Because you squeeze on the lever gently, you will be able to sneak up to 4 percent rather than grab 10 percent and crash instantly. “But it was the gravel’s fault!” No, it was the brake-pressure engineer’s fault. We engineers must be linear while increasing our brake and throttle pressures.

the rest here:

http://www.cycleworld.com/2014/05/28...raking-skills/
 

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I generally concur but I tend to use the engine braking of the Burgman as a sub in and found I was having an issue with the ST1100 actually having to use the brakes to get into the same position in a corner.
I did not do all that well.

I advocate that all riders learn to use the brakes together, learn when it's important to use the rear brake and get some off pavement experience as an aid to that and how the bike handles on uncertain surfaces.

Decent article and a reinforcement that smooth riding and using ALL the technology including front and read braking smoothly together makes for a more confident ride.

I reallly avoid going in hot now as my right hand is still not 100% for fine motor control after coming off the KLR tho it's much better except for the first hour of riding.
 

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True, good info there. But NO I will not add it to my sig line. I may link it in my Facebook page.

Using the correct finesse on the brake levers is how I can run a 120/70 BIAS ply on front and a 185/60 CAR RADIAL on the rear and still maintain control even in the wet corners. I know how much I can squeeze each lever for each condition.
 
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