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On my usual mid-day ride to get lunch, the fat (literally) lady almost sang my swan song. She pulled out between 2 cars stopped for a red light, never looked left and kept on going.
I always try to be careful in city traffic and slow speed and those great ABS brakes saved my day. Never a chance to swerve, as there was nothing but Buick to the left and right of me. I never even got my left hand on the brake handle, but I always have at least one finger on the right brake handle so I quickly got a handful of lever and pulled. The ABS - front brakes on only - worked very effectively. I'm sure w/o ABS the bike would have failed to stop soon enough, high-sided, or flipped me over the bars. This whole thing made me think of a recent thread about leaping off the bike or going down. I never had a chance to even think about it! Past experience has proven to me the value of ABS and it proved itself again. Ride safely!
 

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Don't forget to go to the church of your choice this week. Your little angel may need a refill after today.

Doug from Kentucky
 

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I had an ABS moment on Monday, I was going only a touch fast in a two lane road, not beating traffic out, but creeping past them all by about 10-12kph
suddenly I saw three deer on the left side and almost all traffic at a stop, it was a doe and two fawns almost lost their spots age. The doe and the one turned back in the traffic confusion but the one fawn sprinted trying to outrun me to go in front of me, I was doing about 70k it was not. I pulled both levers as far as they go, 100% ABS on dry pavement. The fawn hit me alongside and knocked some plastic about and my leg, I was almost at a stop when the hit came. Solid little bugger! My leg was almost numb! Fawn did not slide under me or anything and ran in front of me and across road. I was getting some thumbs up from across the road for my sudden stop, but it was all Burgman, that would have been a mess if not for how good these things can work!
 

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rotational sensor only - no yaw sensor.
 

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It activated for me for sure, felt it rattle the front end pretty good, the pulses from the rear were very shadowed by the front. I have tested the rear b4 and I can feel the pulses but they are subtle compared to the front. There was also a brief chirp b4 the ABS came in hard.
Saved me, no doubt at all. Stopping distance from 70k was about 2.5 car lengths including reaction time I think. Thought I was going to do a stoppie :)
 

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These ABS discussions can often turn into a pier-six brawl with no budging on either side. ABS saved me from rear-ending a van once, and I will no longer ride any bike without it. That is complicating my search for another Burgman.

There is a school that believes you have more control without it, but I disagree. I was hammering the front brake the same way I would if I hadn't had ABS. The slightest little extra pressure on the lever would have skidded the front wheel. ABS sensed that was about to happen and prevented it. Compared to the rudimentary early ABS systems, modern systems only kick in when wheel skid is imminent. You don't give away any control by having it. Of course you have to understand its limits, particularly in cornering.

BMW probably set back the cause of ABS a lot with its nightmarish fully-linked 1150RTs. You couldn't use the rear brake without activating the front. I'm not the only one who went down in a slow turn on gravel. CHP refused to buy them that way so BMW made a police modification but wouldn't sell it to the general public. The company never admitted fault, but never used that system on any other bike. Honda had something similar but much more sophisticated. I don't know if it still does.
 

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Qwimby1 - If I were on a race track I would prefer a non ABS system, more direct feel and control in that situation, and your ready for your braking, see it coming, your aware of the other riders and their direction of travel and intent.

In real world driving with cagers that are going every witch way paying little attention and causing those WHOLY SH!T moments where your just stabbing at the brake and praying because there is just no time to do any modulation to control your brakes, ABS rules period!
 

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Qwimby1 - If I were on a race track I would prefer a non ABS system, more direct feel and control in that situation, and your ready for your braking, see it coming, your aware of the other riders and their direction of travel and intent.

In real world driving with cagers that are going every witch way paying little attention and causing those WHOLY SH!T moments where your just stabbing at the brake and praying because there is just no time to do any modulation to control your brakes, ABS rules period!
:)Those are very good points! In fact I prefer not to have it on the track. Most of us feel that we can stop a car in shorter distance without ABS, but we can afford that because a momentary wheel lockup won't cause a car to go down. The best way to practice threshold braking is in an open-wheel car where you can see the wheels tick just slightly stopped and released in rapid sequence. One place I think ABS can help on the track is trail braking in the wet. We simulate that in a sense on the skid pad.

The panic moments you describe are why I wouldn't want a non-ABS bike anymore. You can drill and drill on your braking, but unless you're Reg Pridmore you're going to get an adrenaline rush when that cage pops in front of you and that will very likely go to the fingers on your brake lever.
 

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BMW probably set back the cause of ABS a lot with its nightmarish fully-linked 1150RTs. You couldn't use the rear brake without activating the front. I'm not the only one who went down in a slow turn on gravel. CHP refused to buy them that way so BMW made a police modification but wouldn't sell it to the general public. The company never admitted fault, but never used that system on any other bike. Honda had something similar but much more sophisticated. I don't know if it still does.
BMW used servo assisted linked brakes on a lot more than the 1150RTs. I had them for years on my 2003 R1200CLC and my friend has them on his 06 R1200RT. Once I adjusted to power linked brakes, I liked them. Sold the bike with 47,000 trouble free miles on it.

They were used on: R1150R, R1150RS, R1150RT R1150GS, R1150GS Adventure R1200C, R1200CL 2005-06 R1200RT, R1200ST 2005-06 R1200GS R1100S K1200RS, K1200GT 2005-06 K1200S, K1200R, 2006-08K1200GT 2002-09 K1200LT.
 

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BMW used servo assisted linked brakes on a lot more than the 1150RTs. I had them for years on my 2003 R1200CLC and my friend has them on his 06 R1200RT. Once I adjusted to power linked brakes, I liked them. Sold the bike with 47,000 trouble free miles on it.

They were used on: R1150R, R1150RS, R1150RT R1150GS, R1150GS Adventure R1200C, R1200CL 2005-06 R1200RT, R1200ST 2005-06 R1200GS R1100S K1200RS, K1200GT 2005-06 K1200S, K1200R, 2006-08K1200GT 2002-09 K1200LT.
There's a lot of confusion on this subject. None of the bikes you list had the fully-linked system used on the 1150RT, unless possibly the 1200C and CL. I'm not sure about them. All the others were partially linked, meaning the front brake activated the rear, but the rear was completely independent of the front. You could use the rear where appropriate with no fear of being pulled to the ground by the front. Your friend's 1200RT has the partially-linked system. After the unfortunate 1150RT venture, BMW never again used a fully-linked system.

It was even worse for the first 800 1150RTs built in 02. The servo was too powerful, making it very hard to control your stopping. BMW went to a lower power servo in mid-model year, but refused to retrofit the earlier machines. I owned one of these and fought with the dealer and BMW over it but never got anywhere. I was delighted to see it go. I bought an 04 1150R which had the partially-linked system which worked fine.
 

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There's a lot of confusion on this subject. None of the bikes you list had the fully-linked system used on the 1150RT, unless possibly the 1200C and CL. I'm not sure about them. All the others were partially linked, meaning the front brake activated the rear, but the rear was completely independent of the front. You could use the rear where appropriate with no fear of being pulled to the ground by the front. Your friend's 1200RT has the partially-linked system. After the unfortunate 1150RT venture, BMW never again used a fully-linked system.

It was even worse for the first 800 1150RTs built in 02. The servo was too powerful, making it very hard to control your stopping. BMW went to a lower power servo in mid-model year, but refused to retrofit the earlier machines. I owned one of these and fought with the dealer and BMW over it but never got anywhere. I was delighted to see it go. I bought an 04 1150R which had the partially-linked system which worked fine.
My CLC had fully linked brakes and I have a friend who says his 06 R1200Rt has them. Another friend waited and bought a 07 R1200RT because it had partially linked brakes rather than the fully linked ones .
 

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My CLC had fully linked brakes and I have a friend who says his 06 R1200Rt has them. Another friend waited and bought a 07 R1200RT because it had partially linked brakes rather than the fully linked ones .
Osbornk,

No offense intended but I spent a year battling BMW and my dealer about this.

Servo assist doesn't necessarily mean fully linked. 05 and later R1200RTs had partially-linked, servo-assisted brakes. That's what your friend has on his 06. The only fully-linked RTs were 02-04. Servo assist was discontinued with all 07 BMWs.

Your C, and all or most Beemers of that vintage, had servo assist but I can't speak to the rest of the system. Fully linked appeared on 02-04 1150RTs, but not 05 or later RTs and never on 1150Rs, 1100RSs, (they didn't make an 1150RS) 1150GTs, or any K,F or G bikes with the possible exception of the K1200LT, but I'm not sure about that.

Much confusion is due to BMW's refusal to release any information on just how those brakes worked. Many of us tried to determine if there was a built-in front-rear bias but I don't know anyone who got an answer so a lot of theories abound. A friend who wrote for some motorcycle publications told me that Don Canet dropped an 1150RT attempting a slow turn in front of a bunch of reporters at an introductory showing of the new 1150RT.

BMW refused to sell me the modification it developed at the insistence of CHP, so I dumped my 02 1150RT and bought an 04 1150R with servo-assist, partially-linked brakes and liked it a lot.

BMW knew it had a turkey with the fully-linked system but never admitted it and has never used it again.
 
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