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Is anyone using a synthetic oil in their 650? And if so which ones? Does it make a difference as long as it is 10W40. I noticed that Castrol Syntec is $4 and change a quart while the Suzuki dealer is getting $7 and change for theres. Can anyone shed light here? The book calls for an oil change at 3000 but not a filter. Anyone doing this. I have always changed filter with oil. Dealer wants $10 for filter anything cheaper? Lots of questions but I know you guys know lots of stuff.
 

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Do a search, we have many posts on this topic. I'll make it short so you don't have to read them.

opinion #1: It's a waste of money.

opinion #2: Synthetic oil even makes coffee taste better.

Good luck,
Russ
 

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Yea, tons of controversy regarding synthetic. I use it in my Jetta diesel. The oil costs more than twice as much as dinosaur juice but I extend my oil change intervals to twice as long. I did see a slight increase in mpg when I changed over, but it was very slight. I am supposed to see longevity as the major benefit but I can't confirm that for another few years. For me it's a pain in the butt to do an oil change using synthetic due to availability and some other minor issues. If I was to do it again I would just use cheap oil changed often. On the other side of the coin, at work we changed to full synthetic in our semi trucks and have seen major improvements in efficiency and mileage and we have been able to extend our oil changes from every 250 hours to a whopping 1000 hour interval, all backed by lab tests on the condition of the oil.
My opinion after it is all said and done is if you are going to go super high mileage and don't mind the small inconveniences go for synthetic, otherwise, stick with good old oil changed often.
 

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If changing to synthetic oil, make sure the old oil is warm when you drain it and replace the filter at the same time. I, when switching from regular oil let the vehicle drain overnite to get as much out as possible. There is a engine oil flush on the market if you wish to go to that extent. Even that 1/2 cup or so of old oil left in the filter can dilute the benefits of the synthetic.
 

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Changing to synthetic

There are no significant advantages to using synthetic oil in your Burgman, compared to specified convetional oils as recommended by the manufacturer. As long as you are opperating the vehicle normally and under normal conditions, the recommended oil/filter change interval is probably even conservative.
Having said that, I use full (not blended) synthetic oil in all my vehicles and have since the late 1970s. There is a slight increase in MPG, though not enough to justify the price diifferential. I like the reduced fiddling associated with extended change intervals. Under extreme operating conditions synthetics can offer more protection, but I have not encountered anything that abnormal in my cars, trucks or bikes over the last thirty years. The exception was cold starting ian unheated engine in sub-zero weather in Minnesota, but that was not a motorcycle and the snowmobiles were two-cycle with no internal oil supply.
If you do change over, you do not have to remove every last drop of old oil. Synthetics mix with conventional oils just fine and will eventually come out over the period of several oil changes.
 

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Re: Changing to synthetic

docta said:
Under extreme operating conditions synthetics can offer more protection, but I have not encountered anything that abnormal in my cars, trucks or bikes over the last thirty years. The exception was cold starting ian unheated engine in sub-zero weather in Minnesota,
While my personal vehicle was parked outside in sub-zero temps for 9 hours or more a day while I was out doing service calls, it was nice to know that with Mobil-1 in it, that it would fire up on the first crank when I got back to the shop and was ready to go home. PS: I haven't always lived in S.C.

Regular oil will not affect synthetic, but if enough remains in the crankcase it can cause the viscosity of the synthetic oil to change to that of the regular oil. I don't have the Popular Mechanics mag that I read this in, but it was in an article about the pros and cons of using synthetics some time ago when Mobil 1 first hit the market. Also, synthetics will not cause leaks, but may find some due to it's lower viscosity.
 

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I know what you mean about cold weather and synthetic. I started using Mobil 1 when I lived in Northern Minnesota in the 1970s and have never gone back to dinosaur oils. My cars/truck always sat out overnight and often for several days. -30 degree temperatures were not uncommon and minus 40 occurred from time to time. They always started and I never cringed at the mental image of cold bearings and nearly solid oil. The original Mobil 1 that I used was, I think, a straight 5 weight, and poured at even the coldest temperatures. The float/ski planes we flew were equipped with manual pumps to add gasoline to the crankcase after shutdown. This would dilute the oil for cold starting and after the engine warmend, the gasoline boiled off. It worked.
Given the temperature range and operational parameters for a Burgman, synthetic is overkill except for those of us who are compulsive about every little thing.
 

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I use synthetics, and I like it a lot, mainly for the cooler riding I do. I do find an increase in milage, mostly when it's cooler. I also like to putter and tweak things, like a lot of other members, so that may explain some "fine tuning" and "upgrading" we do.
 
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