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Finally got a look at a picture of the final drive setup on the 650.
I thought it was a belt or something.
It's actually 5 gears in a row.
Suzuki must be trying to corner the market on gears!
Either that, or they had a quota to meet since they didn't use enough in the automatic transmission...

:)

Actually, other than using a shaft drive, it's about as maintenance-free as one can get.

Rusty J
Blue AN650K5 all geared up and nowhere to go
 

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I'm glad it's not a belt. That would probabaly be one more expenive maintenance item to deal with. Other than the "diesel" sound, which in my scooter is pretty minor, it seems like a pretty solid system.
 

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Hopefully it'll be solid and reliable. But it makes me wonder about the frictional power losses of such setup.

Wouldn't a shaft drive served the same purpose? My .02
 

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Actually, I think the gear drive is much more efficient than a shaft drive would be. In most Japanese bikes with a shaft drive, there are two 90 degree turns which use up a lot of power. BMW and some others have one. The gear drive used on the B650 is straight line, the same as a chain drive but without the mess and chain wear. I think it's the most efficient drive system in use today.
 

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I would agree with Wes. There would be some loss from the gear lub drag but you also have friction drag between the links in a chain.
 

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I haven't done a gear lube change yet. Is there any such thing as synthetic gear lube, and if so, would it potentially reduce friction a bit?
 

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Rusty J said:
Finally got a look at a picture of the final drive setup on the 650.
I thought it was a belt or something.
It's actually 5 gears in a row.
Suzuki must be trying to corner the market on gears!
Either that, or they had a quota to meet since they didn't use enough in the automatic transmission...

:)

Actually, other than using a shaft drive, it's about as maintenance-free as one can get.

Rusty J
Blue AN650K5 all geared up and nowhere to go
There are gears in there and pretty substantial ones at that. But there's also a hefty belt in the driveline as well. Got to see the whole thing when my scooter was torn apart for repairs.

Regards,

Dan
 

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Brewman said:
I haven't done a gear lube change yet. Is there any such thing as synthetic gear lube, and if so, would it potentially reduce friction a bit?
Yup,

I use Amsol 75-90 synthetic, You can notice the difference, espically now that the weather is cooling down. Less resistance.
 

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Wes said:
Actually, I think the gear drive is much more efficient than a shaft drive would be. In most Japanese bikes with a shaft drive, there are two 90 degree turns which use up a lot of power. BMW and some others have one. The gear drive used on the B650 is straight line, the same as a chain drive but without the mess and chain wear. I think it's the most efficient drive system in use today.
Good call Wes. A driveshaft's 90 turns result in significant power loss, due to the tangential forces that only serve to push the driveshaft sideways. Anyone who's owned a drive shaft bike has felt these losses in the form of torsional twisting of the swingarm under acceleration.
 

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And don't forget the dreaded driveshaft torque shift - my old Beemer’s always pulled a little to the side during heavy acceleration - heck you could do it but just revving the engine in first gear!
The Burgie's driveline exhibits no such torque pull, plus the lash actually seems pretty minimal
:wink:
 

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dancote said:
...There are gears in there and pretty substantial ones at that. But there's also a hefty belt in the driveline as well. ...
We normally consider the belt, which is part of the transmission, seperately from the "driveline" or "final drive," but, yeah, it's in there.

Really a neat set-up I think. It's a rubber-metal-rubber composite that looks pretty indistructable, compared the the drive belts and tranny belts on many bikes.
 

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