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So, I have an opportunity to buy a used Burgman 2011. Yes, it's 2020 and I would rather get the >2013 but here's the kicker... in NY there are very, very few of these babies around.
The other relevant piece of information is that this bike has only 435 miles on it. Yes, you read that right.

So... how "bad" was the 2011 version? I know that there were significant changes in the transmission post 2013 but are they significant enough to not buy this in-mint-condition bike?

Thanks!
 

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The 2005-2009 are almost exacly the same with a few mods.

No 2010 in USA.

2011-2012 are a bit different. Dash. The CVT has 4 keyways inside, the earlier had 2.
 

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As long as it's not priced like a new bike I would certainly consider it. Would have to be a significant savings over a typical 2013+.

May want to clarify in the title this is regarding a 650.
 

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I have a 2011. Mine is not perfect to say the least. Not sure if it is quality related, or previous owner related. The butt cover just flew off one day. But that was likely a dealer or previous owner issue. However, I'm not sure why they would have taken the butt cover off. Anywho, a tab was broken, and one day that cover went off for a happy meal. I replaced it and it has been fine (I didn't break the install tab though). And lately, the fuel door cover tried to take off for a happy meal, but I caught it first. I'm still needing to (try to) fix that. The fuel door may not be a 2011 / 2012 thing.

The worst things are, it doesn't have an individual coolant temp gauge. And I like gauges. And, mine is eating up the Final Drive. So I'm about to look into that. I don't believe anything but the lack of coolant gauge is specific to this model year.

I would only be concerned about the gas that's been sitting in that tank and engine for a hundred years. And any other long term lot rot. When I worked at Hyundai-Kia, because the Koreans were so brilliant, they would build way too many cars, more than the demand. So their cars would sit in post production lots (outside) and rot. And have to be repaired before sale. I think that's a concern, but if that unit had been parked inside for its life, that is very minimal. Personally, I would buy it if the price were right.
 

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Heck, I'd pounce on it put on new tires, replace all fluids, run it a bit, check valves (the first low mile one is the big important one..the rest thereafter rarely show a need for setting), then run it for at least the next few years and farkle it to my heart's content.
 

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I have a ‘12 and can corroborate what 7milesout says. The lack of a coolant gauge (this model only has an idiot light to let you know you have an overheating issue when it’s already too late, as I found out one day) is disconcerting. That said, the ‘11s and ‘12s are the most updated of the previous body style, therefore they are allegedly less prone to the dreaded CVT issue, but there have been rare occasions of failures nonetheless. Not anything on par with earlier model years, but once in a blue moon you do hear about it.

Another thing of note is that the ‘13 and later years are more fuel efficient while the ‘12 and earlier models are purported to have more power off the line. I don’t know personally, since I’ve never even ridden the later models, but I would like to get one eventually if just for the increased fuel efficiency and there are aspects of the appearance that I prefer (the mirrors don’t seem as big like the older ones that remind me of Dumbo ears) and I prefer the snow white over the off white mine has.

And yes, if you look at used Burgmans for sale, I would say I’ve noticed that the old body style outnumbers the new one by about 80% to 20%, even though it was available here in the USA for nine years and the later model for six. I know because every time I get the hankering to look up what’s out there for sale, it seems all I see is the old style and since I have a ‘12, I feel it makes no sense for me to go backwards in the model bike I have, but ahead. From there, I would suggest someone like rjs982—who has owned both the pre-13 and post-13 models—chime in with a synopsis of ride quality, reliability, fit & finish and what is available in the way of the factory extras between the two.
 

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And ALWAYS replace the 2 small push pins with two wire ties.
 
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As long as it's not priced like a new bike I would certainly consider it. Would have to be a significant savings over a typical 2013+.

May want to clarify in the title this is regarding a 650.
The price is $6,500
 

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That seems a little high to me, but to be fair, I have no idea what the market is like in your area.

One experience I had: bought new 2013 V-strom 650 in 2014, sold it in 2017 with about 5000 miles for $5000, less than half what I had in it. Had a long list of nice mods and farkles (like suspension and engine guards). It was absolutely pristine, well-maintained and had never even been in the rain. I guess the Burgmans hold their value better than standard motorcycles.
 

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To replace tail lights or turn signals, or to deal with a broken seat latch (or the cable if it broke near the latch).
My "unit" does have a trunk box in place of the passenger backrest. I'm betting a dealership monkey broke the butt cover tab at that time. Anywho, when I say monkey, in my mind I'm picturing that old advertisement for the luggage that had a monkey throwing it around, jumping on it, and just rough housing with it. That's what I imagine going on inside OEM dealerships repair shops, with our hard earned vehicles.

Just saw a video of a dealership driving a person's vehicle seemingly out of their repair shop to an outside parking lot seemingly because their "service" or "repair" was complete and they were parking it out to be ready for pickup. The monkey driving it bashed it into the car in front of them when pulling into the parking space. The owner only knew because he had a dashcam and the dealership monkey didn't realize that. The dealer didn't tell the owner anything about it.

My own local Lexus dealer has (or had, the only time when I was there), these little air head girls, who look like they were 17 years old and could barely see over the steering wheel, shuffling cars in and around the service area. It's a good idea to do so because it keeps the service area flowing. But I had been outside before entering the service area and this little … such and such … came whizzing by me, and I mean FAST in the parking lot. I figured it was an owner leaving the place and driving too fast in the parking lot. I was miffed at her for driving so fast in the parking lot. So, a little while later, while I was standing in the service area (was trying to get some free warranty work, post warranty) here comes that same bimbo I had seen whizzing by me in the parking lot wearing her Lexus garb. So I figured out she was moving cars. She sat down in my big LS 460L (the long wheelbase "unit"). I didn't sweat it because I had the key card in my pocket. She then gets out and asks me, "is this your car?" I say, "yes." "She says, can I get the key so I can move it?" I'm not joking, I said, "No f'ing way." She had a look of shock on her face, but then just went away. This dealer offers a cool service that if you park your vehicle in a certain parking lot near the airport, that while you have flown out of town, they'll retrieve your vehicle from that parking lot, take it back to their dealership and do service to it, then take it back to that same lot and have it ready for you when you return. Pretty cool. But I called them and asked them if those driving it were the same people moving cars in the service area. They said for the most part it was. I told them what I had witnessed and therefore I would NEVER do that service. I have ZERO love for any OEM dealerships, bar no department.


And ALWAYS replace the 2 small push pins with two wire ties.
I done done that too, following your advice. And I done put some "Liquid Gold" furniture polish on the gray plastic on El Burgo. And it looks way mo' bettuh. Thanks!


The price is $6,500
Woooh, that is steeply. Not saying it's not worth it. It is "like a virgin." But I paid $3,700 for mine, with 9,200 miles I think it was. Not bragging by any means. Just giving you food for thought.


I guess the Burgmans hold their value better than standard motorcycles.
I read an article about motorcycles and their ability to hold values. Scooters were dead last. However, it could have been that the tiny more "typical" scooters (what people envision when one says "scooter") may be what doesn't hold it's value. I would think a Burgman might tend to hold its value more like a traditional motorcycle.
 

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He's come down to $6k. I'm thinking about it. I currently have a yamaha Majesty 2013 that's in very good condition.
 
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