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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I am in the process of finninshing a deal with one of the members here that was willing to part with her 650.

I ride a DR650 and have about 9" of travel in the suspension and have been riding the DR for 2 seasons now.

While riding the scooter home (on the roads I road to her place) I felt much more jarring of a ride. the suspension never bottomed out or anything, but I noticed all the road imperfections. DON'T misread this as me complaining, but I am curious,

How does the the suspension/ ride quality compare to regular street bikes, cruisers, etc?

I know about changing the dial settings on the rear, just curious on comparisons to other road bikes.

thanks, Joe
 

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Well Joe, don't worry, your not the only one that noticed the suspension could use an upgrade. Larger wheels would help. The rear settings # 1-5 do make a difference. Think of them as one number per #100 (roughly) Riding solo, # 3 seems to work best for a #200 rider. Some members, myself included, did, or had seat work done to improve the ride.
 

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DNFjoe said:
I know about changing the dial settings on the rear, just curious on comparisons to other road bikes.
It feels kind of crude relative to other bikes I have owned or ridden. Nevertheless, I ride it much more than the other's I've owned.
 

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DNFjoe said:
...just curious on comparisons to other road bikes.
Compared to my CH 125 and CH250 Honda Elite scooters, the AN650 is a dream.

Compared to the GL1000 or the BMW Police bike I rode, it's harsh and teeth-rattling.

But I still love touring with it.
 

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DNFjoe

The Burger King's ride is not like a Goldwing :lol: :lol: :lol:

I ride a little more aggressively than some and I found the 4 setting solo 5 two-up seems to be a OK compromise for me.

The Burger King is not a dual sport trail bike either :lol: :lol: :lol:

Here is a technical explanation of Pre-Load Tension wriiten by one of the GL1800 Guru's:

The adjuster increases the PRE-LOAD pressure applied to the spring.

As you increase the pre-load tension, it decreases the amount the bike sags when you sit on it. So the suspension does not compress as far with higher pre-load settings when weight is applied, which results in raising the ride height of the rear end.

This is why they refer to checking the SAG measurement to set the pre-load. Ideally, you want about 1 1/4 inches of sag. Sag is measured as the DIFFERENCE between two measurements. The measurement is taken from the center of the rear wheel to any fixed vertical point on the frame. One measurement is done with the bike on the center stand and no load on the rear wheel and the suspension fully extended. The second measurement is taken with rider sitting on the bike with the suspension settled and the bike off the center stand on the ground and level (takes a helper to measure). Sag is the difference between these two measurements. More pre-load on the spring, means less sag, which in turn means a higher ride height.

It is also worth noting that adjusting the Ride Height or Sag with the pre-load adjuster also affects what portion or the travel range that the shock absorber is in. With the pre-load dialed up high, the shock damper is traveling in the very end of its range. With the pre-load load low, the shock damper travels in the other end of its range. This affects the damping ability of the shock as well.

The amount of force on the spring remains the same no matter where the pre-load is set. 800lbs is 800 lbs. The only thing that can change the force applied is to remove or add weight. All the pre-load adjuster really does is set the top position point of the spring in relation to the shock body, which is why it changes the position of travel that the shock is in. Too much pre-load and the shock will TOP OUT, reaching to top ends of its travel. Too little and it will bottom out and reach the other end. Hence the recommendations for setting sag at 30%. This insures the shock stays in its travel ranges.

The Goldwing has 25 Pre-Load Settings, the Burger King 5.

Do a circuit at 3,4,5. Pick your number. Decide if you need a seat upgrade.

Corbin for me this winter

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the input. I hit one bump that was enough to make my knees hit the console and that was what really made me notice the rougher ride. that could never of happened on the motorcycle.

I never rode a hard tail, sport bike or any other type of motorcycle so I was looking for an opinion or two.

When I testdrove it (1 up and 2up) we were on a parkway and flowing at 60 ish but the road was very smooth. I am going to learn to love it, but the ride home made me wonder. the power is great on it and puts the DR650 to shame.

thaks, joe
 
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