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Wanted to recover my stock seat to make it easier to clean and to do slight modifications to the foam for comfort. Ended up going with a heavy duty black vinyl for both the seat and driver backrest.
The foam in the driver's seat was dished slightly towards the rear to give me a feeling of sitting in the seat rather than on top of it. We also added a bit of foam to the front of the passenger area to get rid of that feeling that the passenger was leaning forward in the seat. Nothing major, but I am hopeful that these subtle changes will make overall comfort and cleaning of the seat slightly better than the stock seat.

The seat color is solid black. I could have chosen a different color, but it works well with my pearl white K9. The lighting in the supplied picture is off, but you should get the general idea of what the finished product looks like.

A project like this will run you between $250-$300 depending on the thickness/quality of the vinyl chosen.
 

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Nice work; I hope it gives you more comfort. Do I understand correctly that you didn't add additional padding on the area where your butt makes contact?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Nice work; I hope it gives you more comfort. Do I understand correctly that you didn't add additional padding on the area where your butt makes contact?
Correct. I thought about taking out a major chunk of foam and replacing it with shaped gel or closed cell foam, but thought better of it for the short term. I have sheep skin covered pads that fit on top of the seat should I feel it necessary to have more butt cushioning on longer trips.
 

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I could not make friends with the stock seat on my '06 650, and bought an airhawk pad, which is effective, but ugly. I've been thinking about adding/changing the foam on the stocker.
 

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How did you dish the driver's seat ?

TheReaper!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
How did you dish the driver's seat ?

TheReaper!
Very Carefully.:icon_smile:

I admit to being very conservative not to get carried away with the "dishing process". I was looking to achieve a subtle dishing effect with a front to back slope angle on the driver and passenger seating areas. The passenger area was not cut and only involved putting a bit more foam behind my backrest.

Pull back the seat cover, mark the area of the foam to be shaved with a black marker, and using an electric knife carefully shave away the foam within the marked area. You can also use a sharp knife to shave the foam, but I found using an electric carving knife allowed me better control of the shaving process. Do it in stages until you achieve the desired effect.(In the end I only shaved off less than an inch of foam at the deepest point in the seat) Use a palm sander to smooth out the ridges made in the cut area and feather the edges for overall smoothness.
I am not what you call a craftsman by any stretch of the imagination, but when I started on this project I found that as long as I took my time and was willing to live with the final results, one way or the other, it was full speed ahead. Once the new seat cover was fabricated and installed by the upholsterer, I was very pleased with the esthetics of the final results. It feels comfortable sitting on the seat in the garage, but the jury will not give a verdict until I take a proper road test when the warmer weather returns in March.:coffee2:

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using an electric knife carefully shave away the foam within the marked area. You can also use a sharp knife to shave the foam, but I found using an electric carving knife allowed me better control of the shaving process.
Many of the DIY videos show this as the way to cut the foam away when installing other foam or "dishing" or "panning" the seat. I start all my projects this way. If you are really handy, a die grinder works very well too. I use a 54 grit 3 inch sanding pad. It's hard to find the right air pressure/speed.

One word of caution, if you cut away too much foam, or make the vertical cuts over the "U" frame, that goes right under the hip bones, it might not be very satisfactory.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Many of the DIY videos show this as the way to cut the foam away when installing other foam or "dishing" or "panning" the seat. I start all my projects this way. If you are really handy, a die grinder works very well too. I use a 54 grit 3 inch sanding pad. It's hard to find the right air pressure/speed.

One word of caution, if you cut away too much foam, or make the vertical cuts over the "U" frame, that goes right under the hip bones, it might not be very satisfactory.

Good cautionary point. I did briefly consider using my die grinder, but the image of me doing a huge oops on the foam had me quickly backing away from the air compressor.
 

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If you use the pneumatic and not the electric, then it is controllable. I have used the electric grinders and large gauges are common. When you can find the right speed, it is the best tool above all.
 

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I notice the (slider?) sticking up from the butt-rest. I have never seen this before, is it original? Does it allow the butt-rest to be raised, and if so how does it cope with fore and aft movement?
 

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That is the attachment for the Utopia backrest.
 
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