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Discussion Starter #1
My basic question is for a stock Burgman 400, what is a safe sustainable speed for long-distance touring without destroying the motorcycle?

The reason I ask is that the B400 feels very comfortable at 80-85mph. That is also the comfortable speed for my B650 ...cruising 80-85mph all day in hot or cold weather. The only difference is the B400 has less torque and less power than the B650, so overtaking speed is limited going 80mph. The B400 is lighter so it is more sensitive to wind. Otherwise -comfort on a level road on the B400 is just as comfortable as the B650, except higher RPMs on the B400.

The heavier weight makes the B650 feel more stable. The lighter weight of the B400 allows for easier commuting in stop-and-go traffic and sharp turns in parking lots. The B400 doesn't have the B650 gear-driven, belt-driven, lifetime?? CVT belt, but that doesn't stop the B400 from feeling comfortable at 80+mph.

Does common sense say that long-distance cruising speed on the B400 is not the wisest thing to do? When I say sustained high speed -I mean a sustainable speed that will still have longevity on the B400.

I know some of you use Dr. Pulley and Malossi parts that can change stock performance and some on you have modified your B400 that stock specifications on MPH-to-RPM no longer apply.

For those of us that are still new and have a stock Burgman 400. How hard can we push the B400 while stay in the safe range of MPH-to-RPM and not hurt the Burgman 400?
 

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All bikes have a red line. You can push it to that all day kong as long as you naintain it properly. Utimatly though its the riders choice at what they feel comfortable My comfort zone on the 650 is just above 5k Rpm as it seems to be a sweet spot. Which is about 85mph on the speedo
 

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what maccecht said.

I ride my 07 to work (weather permitting) on the super slab which is about 68 of the 71 mile commute one way. It seems happy to run all day up to about 7,500 RPM without complaint. What does this do to longevity? Really don't know. But I do have a little over 14,000 miles in 2 years on it and haven't seen any glitter in the oil.

It is time for tires, a belt, variator, clutch (still has the screech and chatter/judder 3 shoe OE clutch) and probably clutch bell. But they are wear items, just gotta deal with it. Once this maintenance is complete, I'd take the 400 on a trip no worries.
 

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My 2013 AN400 used to burn oil at sustained high speeds, and fuel economy (and range) dropped precipitously, but it was fine otherwise. Just keep a bottle of oil under the seat and add as necessary.
 

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My 2013 AN400 used to burn oil at sustained high speeds, and fuel economy (and range) dropped precipitously, but it was fine otherwise. Just keep a bottle of oil under the seat and add as necessary.
Speaking of oil level....prolonged operation with low oil level can contribute to premature alternator stator failure...insufficient cooling of the upper coils.

Another thing to consider about riding the slab on a 400. The final drive gear ratio changed at MY 2010 consequently they run higher rippums at slab speeds.

07 final drive ratio - 5.904:1
10 final drive ratio - 6.484:1

after removing my shoes, dusting off the abacus and slide rule to do the calculations, the rippums difference at 75 MPH is approximately:

MY07 to 09 - 6,998 rippums
MY10 to ? - 7,686 rippums
 

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Discussion Starter #7
maccecht, you're talking about the B650. Yes for me 5-6k RPM is comfortable all day on my B650 -in manual OD the rpms do drop, but I was curious what the Burgman 400 can do?

what maccecht said.

I ride my 07 to work (weather permitting) on the super slab which is about 68 of the 71 mile commute one way. It seems happy to run all day up to about 7,500 RPM without complaint. What does this do to longevity? Really don't know. But I do have a little over 14,000 miles in 2 years on it and haven't seen any glitter in the oil.

It is time for tires, a belt, variator, clutch (still has the screech and chatter/judder 3 shoe OE clutch) and probably clutch bell. But they are wear items, just gotta deal with it. Once this maintenance is complete, I'd take the 400 on a trip no worries.
JRoss, your answer sounds about right at 7,500 rpm. The B400 could be like my former Rebel 250 and Helix 250 where I did WOT all day in 100+ degrees from L.A. to Nevada and Arizona. The wear factor may or may not be that extreme at 8,500 rpm redline on the B400. Having an over squared piston with a short-stroke helps. Only a single-cylinder bike makes it interesting that a bike can be so smooth at such high RPMs.

The metric cruisers and the Sportster Iron may have lower RPMs than the B400, but none of them are as comfortable as the B400 at 80+mph. I mentioned on another post that the Honda 750 Shadow was the smoothest of the V-twin, but pushing the V-twins to 80-85+ mph does not have the comfort factor of the B400. The metric V-twins from the 750cc, 800cc, 1000cc, 1100cc feels downright uncomfortable with lots of vibration even with counterbalanced at the crank. Ok, the rubber mounts on the Sportster is comfortable -but the Harley dealership did warn me that sustained speeds at 85+mph will damage the engine.

Even the Suzuki dealership was hesitant about me buying the S40(Savage) telling me -touring at 70+mph will cause premature top end damage -I not suppose to drive the S40/650cc like the B650. On the B400 -this is not a problem.

BMWs are known to burn oil and is perfectly normal. It is sad if the average B400 burns oil as even my smaller metric bikes in the 250 range never burned oil. JRoss doesn't have a problem with this so it may be bike specific.

THANK YOU everyone for your help in this matter to keeping my B400 as long as possible!
 

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Only a single-cylinder bike makes it interesting that a bike can be so smooth at such high RPMs.
One reason is that the cylinder is horizontal (points forward) so vibration is fore/aft rather than vertical. Another is that it's slightly decoupled from the rest of the bike by the swingarm pivot points, while being solidly attached to a large damping mass (the swingarm and rear wheel). And it's probably got a big honkin' counterbalancer somewhere in there, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
One reason is that the cylinder is horizontal (points forward) so vibration is fore/aft rather than vertical. Another is that it's slightly decoupled from the rest of the bike by the swingarm pivot points, while being solidly attached to a large damping mass (the swingarm and rear wheel). And it's probably got a big honkin' counterbalancer somewhere in there, too.
I wished they did something like that on my former Suzuki M50(800cc V-Twin) and other V-Twins -otherwise I would have kept them. There were counter balance on the M50, but not big honkin' counter balancers attached to the swing arm and rear wheel:cool:.

After owning the B650 for 10 years and 34,000+ miles -I have a lot of respect for the smaller B400. Lots of respect for the B650. Both are great bikes! I know 34,000 miles is low compared to what some of you have on this forum whether the 400 or 650.
 

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The 400 is the Goldilocks Nike of scooters....it does it just right.
 

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There were counter balance on the M50, but not big honkin' counter balancers attached to the swing arm and rear wheel:cool:.
The damping mass I was referring to was literally the swing arm and rear wheel. Basically, the engine vibration (from power impulse and reciprocating mass) has to move the swingarm/transmission/rear wheel before that vibration can get transferred to the frame and the rest of the bike.

One amusing trait of my small Vespa (LX-series, 150cc) is that the bike's vibration at a stop changes when you apply the rear brake.
 

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...
One amusing trait of my small Vespa (LX-series, 150cc) is that the bike's vibration at a stop changes when you apply the rear brake.
Interesting...my 171cc SYM does the same thing. Assuming that by "changes" you mean gets worse.
 
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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
My Burgman 400 Review after several months of ownership and comparisons to some other motorcycles that I've owned.

After having my B400 for a little while where I can go bumper-to-bumper commuting and open it up on the freeways/highways. The B400 works great in both ways. Around L.A. County, I prefer my B400 to my B650 for both city, highway, parking, and pushing it around without the resistance of the CVT of my 2009 B650.

A very comfortable cruising speed for me is 70-80 mph. On the level highway, I have no problem passing at an indicated 90mph. What I do notice is that the B400 is lighter and not as stable as the B650 at 80+mph. The steering gets a little bit too light. The B400 has no problem going an indicated 90mpn, but the steering feels even lighter. Going downhill, I'm sure my B400 can get to an indicated 100mph.

I have to remind myself that I'm only riding a 400cc motorcycle. I've owned the Hayabusa and at 140mph, I feel like I'm only going 50mph due to aerodynamic, suspension, etc.

My serious consideration was to buy the Shadow 750 Aero for L.A. commuting rather than my Goldwing 1800 I previously owned. I've already owned the Shadow 750 and the Suzuki M50(800cc). I going to ignore the M50 Suzuki as it is one of the worse motorcycles I've ever owned for touring and not that great on city streets. The Honda Shadow can cruise at 70mph all day, at 75mph there is a strain, at 80mph -the Shadows is not very confidence-inspiring.

Now we're talking about the B400 -going 70-80mph the engine feels very relaxed. On the level highway, if I find a car is crowding me, I can zip to an indicated 90mph and the engine doesn't feel strained. None of my cruiser bikes from the Honda 750 Shadow, Suzuki M50(800cc), Honda 1100 Shadow, Honda 1100 ACE, including my older Valkyrie 1500 feels as comfortable going sustained speeds of 80+mph. My Valkyrie 1500 was carburated and if I cruised 80mph, I could only go 90 miles before forced to turn on the 'reserve' lever and look for a gas station. My Valkyrie 1500 with slightly over a 5-gallon tank sucking up that much gas is getting about 20mpg. Without a windscreen, most cruisers make you feel all beat up going 70+mph. The B400 at 70+ is very relaxed by the next gas stop sipping fuel as I'm getting between mid 60mpg to low 70mpg.

I know some of you have gone an indicated 100mph+ on your B400. This is interesting as the Honda Fury 1300 cruiser bike has a speed limiter at an indicated 100mph.

As much as I like the B400, you pay for what you get. The listed price on the B400 is more expensive than the Shadow 750, NC750X dual-clutch, CB500X, SV650, etc. etc. The only difference is that the B400 comes with a CVT so you don't have to oil the chain, but the Shadow 750 and M50/800cc come with shaft drive so you don't have to oil the chain. The NC750X dual-clutch comes with a windscreen and dual-clutch so you don't have to shift. The B400 comes with under-seat storage, only the NC750X has storage near the gas tank. The line of Honda 500cc motorcycles are all less expensive than the B400. Even the Kawasaki Ninja 400 and Ninja 650 cost less than the B400.

The B400 comes with dual-disk brakes up front, that cruiser doesn't come with. Not even the NC750X dual-clutch. The Shadow 750 comes with a drum brake on the rear as many other cruiser bikes and single disc upfront.

You get what you pay for. I asked a Suzuki dealer if the Burgman 650 would be coming out in the future and the dealer said no one wants a $10,000 scooter today. Today's $10,000(9,200) scooter is the Piaggio MP3 500cc 3 wheel technology. BMW 650s are $12,000 scooters -the closest to the Burgman 650s.

So it seems that the Burgman 400 is taking the place of the Burgman 650 as the premier Suzuki scooter. Yamaha has the XMax 300cc, Honda no longer making the Forza 300cc.

The closest competition for the B400 is the BMW 400X scooter. It's a 350cc scooter, about the same horsepower as the B400 and cheaper than the Burgman 400. The BMW 400(350cc) similar performance and specs as the B400.
 

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R1200, you may have said but I don't remember...what year is your 400? My 2011 will get up to 80 indicated fairly easily, then takes a little time up to 95. Reduced rpm due to sliders probably has an effect. If I recall, gearing and engine may be a little different on the new models.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
R1200, you may have said but I don't remember...what year is your 400?
I have the 2018 Burgman 400. Everything is stock except I have the larger Suzuki B400 windscreen and 56 liter GIVI top box that were installed before I took delivery. So what I'm reporting is my experience with the accessories above.

Otherwise, I have no experience riding a B400 with stock windscreen and no topbox. This may have some effect on performance?

On my 2018 B400, Same with me, I can get up to an indicated 80-85 mph fairly easy. Then it takes a little time for me to get to 95mph. I haven't tried to get my B400 to an indicated 100mph. Because it takes time to get to 95 mph, at that speed, I'm passing cars too quickly and can get into trouble. I realize I'm riding only a 400cc motorcycle, with accessories that will cut down on the aerodynamics of a stock B400.
 
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