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Sorry, at 75 I'm too brain dead to read the 444 plus member responses for stems and trailering. Two years and 1000 miles ago I bought my 08 executive. The original owner tied it down on my uhaul trailer rental and I made it home 80 miles without any problems. I had new tires installed at a dealership and they did not recommend anything about stems. I hadn't owned a motorcycle in 12 years and I did not remember about angled stems. I went to my shed a couple of hours ago and noticed that I had a rear flat tire. I had just driven it 2 days ago and thank God it didn't happen while I was doing 75mph. I have been lucky and not had a flat in over 40 years on a car and never on a motorcycle. I proceeded to air it up but it would not hold the air. I first thought the valve was blown out of the stem but I think it is the stem. I've done several maintenance jobs on my scoot but I can't remove my rear tire. It's above my pay grade. I am going to call the dealership on Tuesday. First, will they have the stems in stock, that you members recommend (which are), or do I need to order them online. Next, I am going to call AAA, which I have never used for car or bike, to take it to the dealership. This is where I need you smart guys to tell me how to tell the driver to Exactly tie her down....Thanks I really appreciate all of your imput. Ready2ride....keep the rubber down.
 

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2022 Matte Deep Blue Kymco AK 550
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I have tied down my Burgman 650. The front forks have a cast tab that sticks out on each fork just at or above the fender on the back side of the fork tube. That's where I tie around the fork since that tab will hole the tie strap. No need to compress the forks since that is on the lower part of the fork. Do that on each side of the front wheel and that will be plenty to hold the bike straight up as long as the front wheel is in a wheel chock of some kind. After that you will need to use straps on each side of the rear wheel to keep the rear end from moving side to side. That's all that is needed to tie this bike down on a mc trailer. I don't like strapping at the handlebar as some riders tend to like doing. That's due to reading too many accounts of broken or bent handlebars from the stresses of bouncing. The bars are just not made for that kind of stress. (I know there are plenty of riders who report no issues doing that but most are with much lighter bikes or just plain luck). Oh, and since this is a scooter engage the parking brake after it is tied down to keep the rear wheel from turning. That also helps even more to keep the rear end from shifting. DO NOT PUT THE SCOOTER ON THE CENTER STAND OR LEAVE THE SIDE STAND DOWN! VERY IMPORTANT. Putting the scooter on the center stand or with the side stand down will only invite damage with the bike frame or trailer bed. Again, there are some who have done that without issue but luck is involved again. No need to invite problems.

The leg shield on this scooter prevents using the triple tree to tie down the front as on a classic motorcycle.

I've tied my Burgman 650 down in a pickup truck this way and also my AK 550 in a U-Haul mc trailer this way and had no problems transporting them.
 

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Sorry, at 75 I'm too brain dead to read the 444 plus member responses for stems and trailering. Two years and 1000 miles ago I bought my 08 executive. The original owner tied it down on my uhaul trailer rental and I made it home 80 miles without any problems. I had new tires installed at a dealership and they did not recommend anything about stems. I hadn't owned a motorcycle in 12 years and I did not remember about angled stems. I went to my shed a couple of hours ago and noticed that I had a rear flat tire. I had just driven it 2 days ago and thank God it didn't happen while I was doing 75mph. I have been lucky and not had a flat in over 40 years on a car and never on a motorcycle. I proceeded to air it up but it would not hold the air. I first thought the valve was blown out of the stem but I think it is the stem. I've done several maintenance jobs on my scoot but I can't remove my rear tire. It's above my pay grade. I am going to call the dealership on Tuesday. First, will they have the stems in stock, that you members recommend (which are), or do I need to order them online. Next, I am going to call AAA, which I have never used for car or bike, to take it to the dealership. This is where I need you smart guys to tell me how to tell the driver to Exactly tie her down....Thanks I really appreciate all of your imput. Ready2ride....keep the rubber down.
Tie Downs:

What @rjs987 said above should help you out. I don't have any experience in this area, but what he says sounds good to me (based on years of reading posts).

Valve Stems:

Also over those many years, I have replaced stock valve stems mostly with low-profile, near-right-angle stems, such as these, from two reputable outfits:



Those angled valve stems make adding air much easier. Point them left or right, in a way that makes adding air easier for you; in my case, I like the one in front on the Big Burgers pointing to the right (given that the bike will lean over toward the left, if on the sidestand), and the one in back pointing to the left, because I find that there's more room to get in over there out back (although some folks disagree).

It's possible that a dealer will have these low-profile aluminum valve stems in stock. I prefer the low-profile versions over, say, this kind (although they will do in a pinch):


I would stay away from anything that has a bunch of rubber, such as these:


By the way, if you go on Amazon and enter, say, 90 degree valve stem in its search box, you will see a boatload of the possibilities.

And keep in mind that something like this ...


... is for temporary use only, i.e., when adding air, not for keeping on a bike while riding.

Another note: the Big Burgers have the common 11.3mm rim-hole size, so that's a plus.

Final note: on my last two bikes, going back half a dozen years now, I've added the T-Valves from FOBO (which fit both the common rim-hole sizes):


This is bulkier than the low-profile valves stems I suggested above, but has two advantages:
  • It provides enough room to add an external TPMS sensor (such as the ones from FOBO, which I now use, or from other manufacturers); the low-profile ones probably do not offer enough room).
  • You can add or subtract air with disturbing or otherwise messing with a TPMS sensor.
I'm 74 now, and about a decade ago I decided I was getting too old to get down on the ground to check or add air (which -- getting down on the ground -- was a requirement with the bagger/dresser I had, with hard saddlebags obscuring the back wheel). So I started adding TPMS sensors to my bikes. I can do a pre-ride check standing up, no tools required, which I really like.

I bought my T-Valves directly from FOBO, and the shipping was quick enough. You can also get these at WingStuff (with whom I've also done business a time or two over the years):


I doubt any dealership stocks these, though.

You can always go with whatever the dealer has, for now, with your repaired or new tire, and go with a more preferred solution the next time you need tires.

Good luck.
 

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This is why you do NOT tie down the fronts only at the handle bars. The Burgman was in the back of a pickup truck and they used "Canyon Dancers". The driver dropped the right wheel of the truck in a shalow ditch and the bike flopped over and bent the handle bars.
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the way I read it op has decided to use stems at dealership , so he wanted advice on how to tie down, and how to show the aaa guys to tie it down. personally I've had a lotta problems with stems and seeds in my younger days but gettin tied up or tyin up warnt no problem and kinda fun:devilish:
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies. Will go out and locate the cast tabs that stick out on each fork. My uhaul trailer had a chock and the original owner used a few rachet ties down on the front and back. He even wrapped them through the pillion rider handles. I wasn't sure about this and guessed this was okay as long as there was some padding to protect them from scratching the paint. I'm not going to tie down the front only at the handle bars. Thanks for the picture. I don't know if the truck will have a chock of some kind but will call ahead to make sure that they send a driver that has one available. I haven't yet decided to use dealership stems, but I don't want to wait for a week or two for online, back orders, and deliveries. I'm hoping that I can find low profile near right angled stems locally. I've found the stems mickey but I can't locate the seeds. LOL. Thanks again. Keep the rubber down.
 

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Yes, do not tie to the pillion rider handles. They also are not designed to handle that kind of stress.
Keep in mind that when a bike on a trailer or pickup bed is bounced normally while going down the road the stresses can be at least double or even triple the weight of the bike. The only parts that can handle that are the frame and suspension. Parts designed for you to hold onto are not able to handle that.

Here is a photo I grabbed from the Internet that clearly shows the "tabs" I referred to on the outer/lower fork tube circled in red. The flare at the top of the fork tube will aid in keeping the strap in place and that tab will prevent the strap from sliding down the tube. This pic shows the "back side" of the fork assembly. The tabs are the same for all model years of the 650.
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, do not tie to the pillion rider handles. They also are not designed to handle that kind of stress.
Keep in mind that when a bike on a trailer or pickup bed is bounced normally while going down the road the stresses can be at least double or even triple the weight of the bike. The only parts that can handle that are the frame and suspension. Parts designed for you to hold onto are not able to handle that.

Here is a photo I grabbed from the Internet that clearly shows the "tabs" I referred to on the outer/lower fork tube circled in red. The flare at the top of the fork tube will aid in keeping the strap in place and that tab will prevent the strap from sliding down the tube. This pic shows the "back side" of the fork assembly. The tabs are the same for all model years of the 650.
View attachment 98060
Yes, do not tie to the pillion rider handles. They also are not designed to handle that kind of stress.
Keep in mind that when a bike on a trailer or pickup bed is bounced normally while going down the road the stresses can be at least double or even triple the weight of the bike. The only parts that can handle that are the frame and suspension. Parts designed for you to hold onto are not able to handle that.

Here is a photo I grabbed from the Internet that clearly shows the "tabs" I referred to on the outer/lower fork tube circled in red. The flare at the top of the fork tube will aid in keeping the strap in place and that tab will prevent the strap from sliding down the tube. This pic shows the "back side" of the fork assembly. The tabs are the same for all model years of the 650.
View attachment 98060
Thanks rjs987. I will not be tying onto the pillion rider handles and thanks for the photo. The side stand and center stands will both be up. I also ordered the aluminum stems on Amazon and they will be here tommorow. I wonder how much the dealership will charge to put in one valve stem? Probably an arm and a leg. I'm sure mikeyMarine knows where I can find one of each. LOL Appreciate all of the imput....Have a great day....
 

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I don't know... mikey might have his tied up.

My local dealer didn't really charge much if any extra to replace the stems. They build that into the tire replacement charges anyway since rubber stems should be replaced every tire change per Suzuki. Though I don't know a lot of riders who actually do that so often.
 

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In the rear I use soft ties straps that go over each shock down low on the swing arm. I also use soft ties on the triple tree forks. 4 each for $8.99 or 8 each for $9.99


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. I wonder how much the dealership will charge to put in one valve stem? Probably an arm and a leg. I'm sure mikeyMarine knows where I can find one of each. LOL Appreciate all of the imput....Have a great day....
I'm really more of a leg man :devilish: , can't help much with arms
 

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since rubber stems should be replaced every tire change per....
Exactly the reason we are having this discussion, all vehicle and/or tire manufacturers recommend you do so, poor workmanship from that dealer IMO, I've always been asked by dealers were I have carried tires in for mounting, on few occasions I had to initial the decline block, IAC most of my bikes have/had aluminum stems.
You have no such choice at Discount Tire, etc. you get new valve stems or TPS service kit with new tires.
Maybe that dealer could give you a discount for their own FU fix. :unsure::whistle:
 

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Sorry, at 75 I'm too brain dead to read the 444 plus member responses for stems and trailering. Two years and 1000 miles ago I bought my 08 executive. The original owner tied it down on my uhaul trailer rental and I made it home 80 miles without any problems. I had new tires installed at a dealership and they did not recommend anything about stems. I hadn't owned a motorcycle in 12 years and I did not remember about angled stems. I went to my shed a couple of hours ago and noticed that I had a rear flat tire. I had just driven it 2 days ago and thank God it didn't happen while I was doing 75mph. I have been lucky and not had a flat in over 40 years on a car and never on a motorcycle. I proceeded to air it up but it would not hold the air. I first thought the valve was blown out of the stem but I think it is the stem. I've done several maintenance jobs on my scoot but I can't remove my rear tire. It's above my pay grade. I am going to call the dealership on Tuesday. First, will they have the stems in stock, that you members recommend (which are), or do I need to order them online. Next, I am going to call AAA, which I have never used for car or bike, to take it to the dealership. This is where I need you smart guys to tell me how to tell the driver to Exactly tie her down....Thanks I really appreciate all of your imput. Ready2ride....keep the rubber down.
Hi, Im just asking because this has bit me, have you checked to see if the valve core is loose or missing? If it’s just that, you’ll be up and running quick. Best of luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi, Im just asking because this has bit me, have you checked to see if the valve core is loose or missing? If it’s just that, you’ll be up and running quick. Best of luck.
Hey Andy.....I did check and the valve core was tight....the rubber stem was torn....I'm replacing it with the angled metal nut and washer stem that rjs recommended. Thanks for the reponse....Have a great day and keep the rubber down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Exactly the reason we are having this discussion, all vehicle and/or tire manufacturers recommend you do so, poor workmanship from that dealer IMO, I've always been asked by dealers were I have carried tires in for mounting, on few occasions I had to initial the decline block, IAC most of my bikes have/had aluminum stems.
You have no such choice at Discount Tire, etc. you get new valve stems or TPS service kit with new tires.
Maybe that dealer could give you a discount for their own FU fix. :unsure::whistle:
The dealership is giving me the stem replacent discount of one hour's labor charge of $85 out of the goodness of their heart. Thanks and have a great day.
 

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Hey Andy.....I did check and the valve core was tight....the rubber stem was torn....I'm replacing it with the angled metal nut and washer stem that rjs recommended. Thanks for the reponse....Have a great day and keep the rubber down.
Hi, well heck, I was hopeful you’d get lucky. I took A look at your profile then did a quick search. I found this.
Maybe it might be a lot easier than trying to get your bike to a shop. Have the shop come to you.
All the best!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hi, well heck, I was hopeful you’d get lucky. I took A look at your profile then did a quick search. I found this.
Maybe it might be a lot easier than trying to get your bike to a shop. Have the shop come to you.
All the best!
Thanks mucho....I saved the site in my favorites for future possible needs....I rented a uhaul motorcycle trailer for the day for $14.95 and returned it after 1 1/2 hours.....thanks again for all of you helpful info.....Have a good day....
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Here I go again...drove my Burg home from shop. $85.97. The next day I drove around San Antonio. Two days later, yesterday, I went to drive my scoot and it seemed harder to roll out of my shed. Got off and checked the tire pressure. It only read 20psi. The stem was difficult to reach with my air hose. I aired it to 41psi. I called my mechanic, that used to work for this Kent Power Sports dealership, to ask him what he thought the problem might be and if the stem should have been torqued. He told me that it should be torqued but they probably had not. I had read on the internet that the nut should be tightened until the rubber grommet bulges slightly on the inside of the wheel. Technically the nut should be torqued between 25 and 55 inch-pounds. I thought that I would check the tire tomorrow to see if it has leaked again.The dealership is closed today, so I decided that I would go there tomorrow and discuss this with the shop manager. Next, I got my receipt out to see if there was any install informantion. There was nothing there that said that it was installed and torqued. It did read, which I didn't :

Description:customer supplied
Resolution:customer supplied valve is not long enough to fit into rim

No one told me anything except "it's ready." I got out the Amazon receipt for my order that states "this stem is compatible for Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha. This is also the same stem that was recommended here from the community. So, tomorrow I'm going to go do battle with the dealership. Any suggestions? Wish me good luck. Thanks for listening.
 

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If you bought the 11.3mm stems and those recommended above, your dealership Tech needs to go back to school. I have put those on 3 Burgman 650's now.

I think what happened is the Tech only popped one side of the tire off, smushed the bead over till he could get the stem in and finger tightened it and POOF reset the bead.
 
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