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Discussion Starter #1
Last year I installed Fiamm Freeway Blaster horns, one high tone and one low tone, on my 2013 Burgman 650. I would have preferred the Stebel Nautilus air horn as I had installed on my 2005 Burgman 650 and also my ST1100 but I couldn't find any location where they fit under the plastic without splitting the Stebel compressor off the air horn part. I wasn't so sure I wanted to do that at that time so went with the Freeway Blasters.

I had one Freeway Blaster horn that I had bought for my CTX1300 due to having the same issue of not finding where to fit a Stebel. But that Fiamm horn failed out of the box so replaced it on warranty... and very soon after the second one failed as well so replaced it with off-brand electric horns from AutoZone called the Highway Blazers and those worked well for several years.

I should have stuck with what I learned about Fiamm horns the first time. The horns I installed last year on this Burgman have started to fail now. Both of them. Sounding really sick. At first it was just a sad sound coming out until I tapped the horn button a few times and they came back to life but now that doesn't work so I'm going back to the horn I've had the most success with... The Stebel Nautilus.

I found ONE video on how to split this horn on YouTube. Only one that was recorded and posted in 2013. And several older forum threads about it from a few years earlier than that. I guess Stebel decided to try harder to split their horn and added more and better glue than what was shown in that video. The video made it look easy but it was anything but easy.

Anyone familiar with this horn is aware there is an intake tube down the side of the compressor and, as with most compact air horn compressors, there is an outlet stub that fits into the top of the air horn assembly. To split this horn the first thing to do is to slightly pry the tab at the outlet fitting so it will clear and physically release the sleeve from the compressor body. The inlet tube also has a small flashing that inserts into the inlet hole that SHOULD be easy to clear. But mine had glue all the way around at least 80% of the circumference of the sleeve rather than just one spot under the air horn assembly. I ended up using a hack saw blade to cut the sleeve just next to the inlet tube that runs down the side, between that and the air horn resonator that is just next to it. Then I was able to pry the sleeve to separate the glue on the opposite side of the compressor and also just where the air horn assembly is against the compressor. After sticking my hack saw blade (not mounted in the hack saw) under the sleeve and working my way around the sleeve and compressor I finally felt it give and the air horn assembly slid off. The inlet tube was well glued to the body of the compressor... which is fine since I wanted that to stay on. I cut off the part of the sleeve on the other side of the inlet tube just for making it even, though I really didn't need to do that. It would have been fine as it was. Then I did some more cutting of the remaining sleeve around the air horn assembly to make that even leaving enough to use for mounting that part of the air horn by itself. Whew! that was a chore.
IMG_20200726_211622.jpg

Now to find what I'll use to connect an air hose into the air horn assembly where the compressor fitting used to go.
I have the clear tube that is just the right size and fits tightly onto the compressor fitting. But needed something to insert into the air horn assembly hole and after some searching found just the perfect thing. Turns out a Bic Click pen body is the perfect fit for the hose and fits slightly loose in the air horn hole. The inner diameter of the pen body is slightly larger than the outlet of the compressor so that won't be an issue with air flow. I added ONE layer of electrical tape to one end of the pen body and cut the tape so the ends meet exactly together without gaping or overlapping. This made for a tight fit into the air horn hole.
IMG_20200727_120146.jpg
Then I cut the pen body to length.
IMG_20200727_120517.jpg
Here is a test fitting of all the parts (other than the electrical connections).
IMG_20200727_120624.jpg
Now I'm ready to fit it all onto the Burgman.
I will not be using the same fused connection in my Aux fuse block since that only handles 15 amps per circuit and this horn needs a 20 amp fuse. So I'll add a separate fused line for this but keep the same wire pair and relay since I sized those wires for 25 amps and the relay is a 20 amp. If the relay cannot handle the current over a bit of time I'll replace with a beefier relay but for now I'll just keep what is there. Since there is only one compressor to plug into wires rather than 2 electrical horns I'll remove one pair of wires but I'll still keep the factory horn connected since that seems to still be working fine (I can still hear it over the sick sound the Fiamm horns make!).

More to come as I proceed with the install.
 

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I wonder if you had put it in the oven at a bit less than 150 F if that glue would have been softer.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I wonder if you had put it in the oven at a bit less than 150 F if that glue would have been softer.
Maybe, but I didn't want to find out that it also melted some other glue that needed to stay intact. Or maybe if I had put it in the freezer at -2F that the glue would have crystallized and popped away easier. I'm good with how it turned out now anyway.
 
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@rjs987:

1) Nice work!

2) And thanks for the detailed description, and pics. This may come in handy for a future bike.

3) Back in 2000, about two months after buying a brand new Valkyrie Interstate, I added a Fiamm system of dual air horns and a separate compressor. They were sold that way, but the trumpets are probably too large to fit on Burgers. Some 20 years(!) later, this seems to be their current version: Amazon.com: FIAMM Fultone II Twin Air Horns with Compressor Kit - Horn FULTONE White - White Powder Coated 12 Volt Compressor (62350-12): Sports & Outdoors .

Here's what it looked like, underneath my Valk:

2001-09-23-16-56-19.jpg


BTW, I later replaced those with a four-horn electric system and bracket, in the same place, that a Valk owner was fabricating (but I don't seem to have a pic of that). That was even louder.

4) Speaking of lots of room and louder, my favorite bike horn setup remains this one, by another Valkyrie vendor/rider:



Be a real problem fitting on a Burger, as you also need a separate air tank. You can read about that at Train-Horn (which I think shows a lot creativity, in any case).
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Back to this program... er, project in progress here.

I made a change to my electrical diagram to move the fuse for the Stebel horns to an individual 30 amp inline fuse holder, that will have a 20 amp fuse in it as required for the Stebel. My Eastern Beaver 3CS fuse block can only have 15 amps per circuit so this change is needed. I prefer to minimize how many wires are connected at the battery terminals so I am making a pigtail that will split between the Stebel Air Horn and the Eastern Beaver fuse block. For ground I am implementing what I have on my last 3 bikes and using a common household grounding block, like you find in a circuit breaker box in your home. This will be a 4 terminal ground block and is made of aluminum so corrosion is not an issue. I usually tin the wire ends with solder and coat them with dielectric grease in the ground block and then put a sheath of shrink insulation over it all to protect it a bit more from the elements under the seat. This has worked really well in the past to allow only one large gauge wire from the battery to provide grounding for many smaller gauge wires. And I can locate this block anywhere on the bike to get a reliable ground connection... WAY more reliable than frame ground.

Pictures will follow in a future post. I found I had run out of female quick disconnects in the size I need, 12ga, so will have to buy more and finish the pigtail later.

edit: here is a photo of what I did today so far.
91273

The red pigtail, in the middle, with the splice in the center will have that splice soldered and covered with heat shrink insulation. Always make sure there is a strong physical connection before soldering wires. Never rely on the solder to provide any strength in the connection. The bare ends of that pigtail will have 12ga female quick disconnects added. All the female quick disconnects will have heat shrink insulation covering any bare metal of the connector. Heat shrink is cheaper than buying the quick disconnects with the insulated ends anyway. Each hole in the grounding block with a screw on it can have 2 wire ends of up to 10ga. (the center hole is used for a screw to mount the block to a panel but I usually use a zip tie if anything).
 

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@rjs987:

1) Nice work, good points, etc.

2) Probably not for you -- you know what you're doing, have expert skills, and so forth -- but for others, in perhaps a similar situation, I can recommend Powerlet's Termin-8:


I used one of these (the shortest version, when it was all they offered) on my Victory bagger, which I owned from 2012 - 2017. The main point of this gizmo is to mitigate glomming up battery terminals with a handful of extra wires, which can only lead to trouble.

On the Vic, I needed to add very few devices, so it was the only bike I've owned that I didn't add a full-fledged fuse panel. For the Vic, I added a fused Powerlet socket (for smart-charging and heated gear), a Stebel (with its own relay), a set of Motolights, and maybe one or two other things which escape my memory at the moment.

In any event, the Termin-8 suited my needs quite nicely, and was, like all Powerlet products I've used over the years, designed and fabricated quite well. As I say, recommended for simple electrical farkling needs.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Just a very important note about spicing together 2 wires in the way I am doing with that red pigtail for those who may want to do this...
When adding a second wire in the middle of the first wire I DO NOT SIMPLY WRAP THE SECOND WIRE AROUND THE BARED PART OF THE FIRST WIRE! That does not provide a strong physical connection. Instead I lay the bare end of the second wire next to the bare part of the first wire and TIGHTLY TWIST THEM BOTH TOGETHER so they hold each other well. The solder will be enough to reinforce the twist even if it cracks a bit under the stresses and vibration of the bike, but it is the twisting TOGETHER that provides the strength.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Finally had a weekend to do some work on the bike. Yesterday I removed the front wheel and had the shop put a new tire on and then reinstalled the front wheel. Details on that here:
Remove and Install front wheel- 2013 Burgman 650

Today I finally got back to replacing those sick sounding Fiamm electric horns. They were loud when I first installed them but lately they became really sick sounding so they are out and the Stebel Nautilus is in.

The spliced pigtail I was making for the positive terminal off the battery turned out to be a bit short so I remade it longer. I had already run the gauge wire I felt was plenty for the Nautilus air horn. At 18 amps and maybe almost 7 ft round trip circuit 16 ga wires were good to go. The relay I already had installed for the electric horns was also good for the Nautilus so that stayed as well. I learned how to remove the Front Leg Shield cover and the Front Leg Shield looking for a place to put the now split Nautilus air horn (see the first post in this thread). Man, Suzuki really trimmed down the bodywork to limit free space under the plastic. I finally settled on placing the air horn part at the bottom to the right of the radiator just at where the foot boards curve up and zip tied the module to the foot board metal brace.
91491


I found I still had to cut an opening in the lower radiator shroud since part of the horn trumpets pressed against it. But that's OK. It's out of sight and now there's an opening to allow more of the sound to escape out toward the front.

I used some JB Plastic Weld around the Bic Click part I made to fit into the inlet hole in the trumpets and also around the vinyl hose that is on it. That's not going anywhere. Then I made a friction shield to put around the air hose at the inlet since that part looked like it just might rub a little on the foot board brace.

I found there was plenty of space for the compressor right next to the ignition switch under the top cover. And if I had it turned just right the built in bolt tab wedged against the ignition switch mounting to hold it firmly in place. I know that there can be a lot of road grunge that kicks up through the fork tunnel into that space. The handlebar cover blocks the vast majority of that from getting through to the rider. But to protect the compressor from "inhaling" anything I added the inlet adapter that Stebel provided and routed an inlet air hose to the primary fuse box area since that is well protected. I also zip tied the compressor in place and added a zip tie to hold the output air hose in place... but not too tight so as not to restrict the air flow.
91492

That coil of green wire is what WAS used for ground to the electric Fiamm horns. I used one of the pair on the compressor and just coiled the other and left it since it is only ground. Power out from the relay already had the correct quick disconnect end that I just plugged into the compressor.

Here is the resulting mess under the seat in the tool storage area.
91493

The new inline fuse for the Nautilus compressor is the upper one. The lower one is the main fuse for the Eastern Beaver fuse block which you can see here laying next to the new inline fuse holder.
The new power pigtail is the red wire from the battery that is spliced into 2 wires, one leg for my aux fuse block and one for the new Nautilus air horn compressor. The new ground block is laying on top the battery just over the negative terminal.

Here is my new and updated electrical diagram for the stuff I've added so far.
91506

The new Nautilus horns are every bit as loud as I remember. Even though the calculated db output is about the same as what the Fiamm electric horns were rated the Nautilus air horns sound so much louder. Now I'll be heard again.

Oh, one more note...
In the electrical diagram you'll notice that the air horn relay (Relay B) has power to it all the time. Since that relay is not activated unless the stock horn wire pair have power, and the OEM horn can sound, the air horns do NOT sound with the ignition turned off. I figured if that relay failed and the connection between input power and output power stayed "on" that I would simply pull the fuse under the seat until I could pull the top cover off and replace that relay. And also take some time to recover from the loud horn sounding until I can get the fuse pulled!!! o_O
 
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