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Discussion Starter #1
So, was getting gas last night and as I always do, I left the key in the on position while I filled up. Went to start it and it wouldn't crank fast enough. Left it sit a few min and came back and it started ok. Went to my mechanic and he tested it off and on and said it's only charging 10 volts. He said the stator is out and the rectifier is usually what comes next. So, I can't find what a stator is and what part it is on the order page on line. Found the rectifier though. So, does this sound right?
 

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If you are looking at one of the online parts fiche you have to look under magneto to find the stator. It is item number 2 on this fiche http://www.partshark.com/fiche_sect...gory=Scooters&make=SUZUKI&year=2003&fveh=7244

As for if it sounds right, mostly it does. If the voltage measured at the battery is less than 14 volts with the engine running at around 5,000 rpm then you most likely have a problem with the regulator/rectifier and/or the stator. It could be either or both. You need to test them to find out.

If you have access to a service manual the test procedures are in section 8 starting on page 10. They are pretty simple to do. You will need a multimeter and you will need to take off the front box to gain access to the plugs for the regulator/rectifier and the stator.

Stators are pretty expensive but you can find places that will rewind your old stator for about 1/2 the cost. That is what I did when the one on my 650 went out.
 

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Ok, thank you so much for helping me find that part. 300+ is way too much for it though. How did you re wrap the copper? What did you use to insulate it? Why does the copper go bad? Where can I get the right copper? Etc. thanks for all the help.
 

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As for why it goes bad, I'm not sure. I think mine failed because the regulator went bad and that burnt out the stator. There are three segments on the stator and mine was only bad in one segment. The insulation on that segment was burnt black. When I tested it I was getting AC voltage from the other two segments but nothing from that segment.

The test is to unplug the stator then use a multimeter on the AC voltage setting. There are 3 yellow wires going to the plug from the stator. You measure the AC voltage between any two of them with the engine running at 5,000 rom. You should get 55+ volts AC between any two of the three wires. Test all three combinations to see what voltage you get for each. If even one of the combinations is less than 55 volts AC then the stator is bad.
 

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As for why it goes bad, I'm not sure. I think mine failed because the regulator went bad and that burnt out the stator.
That was my experience.

There are three segments on the stator and mine was only bad in one segment. The insulation on that segment was burnt black. When I tested it I was getting AC voltage from the other two segments but nothing from that segment.
Again, that was the state of my stator. Unintentional pun.

What happened to me: we were touring in Oregon. My bike stalled --- flat battery. Took it to the shop, it was shot, bought a new one. Next day, coming down a very long hill between Elgin and Wallowa, Oregon, my bike started to sputter and die. I should have left it for dead and coasted 'deadstick', but I kept trying to keep it running, nursing it however I could until we got to a place to pull over. We towed it back to Baker City where the stator was pronounced DOA.

The problem all along was the regulator. It wasn't charging the battery and once it went flat, the long downhill run overloaded the stator. Once you let the smoke out, it's never the same.

My bike is a 2009 AN650 Executive, Canadian model. My wife's bike is the same, but from a different production batch, per the VIN. I've had problems with the regulator/stator and with the sticky starter switch where my wife's bike has had no such problems.

Either way, replacing the stator requires tearing the bike down to where you can get the transmission apart, since it lives in there. It's an expensive part, but rebuilt ones are available, as noted. There's nothing wrong with them if they're rewound properly and they are half the price. Your dead one has salvage value. Replacing the regulator takes thirty seconds, but it's impossible to reach without disassembling the entire rear half of the bike. All in all, it's not a cheap repair if you're paying shop rates.

Good luck
Scott Fraser
 

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Either way, replacing the stator requires tearing the bike down to where you can get the transmission apart, since it lives in there.
The stator on the 650 is not inside the transmission. It is inside the crankcase on the end of the crankshaft behind a cover on the left side of the engine. The cover is just in front of the clutch housing.

On the 400 it is behind a cover on the right side of the engine above the dipstick and the water pump.
 

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The stator on the 650 is not inside the transmission. It is inside the crankcase on the end of the crankshaft behind a cover on the left side of the engine. The cover is just in front of the clutch housing.

On the 400 it is behind a cover on the right side of the engine above the dipstick and the water pump.
Okay. I didn't fix it. All I saw was that it was deep inside, difficult to get at and not something I would choose to do.

All over a $2 part.

Regards
Scott Fraser
 

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I guess it depends on what you call difficult. I though it was pretty simple. Remove the magneto cover. Unplug the wire to the stator and unbolt the CKP sensor. Pull the stator off the end of the crankshaft. Took me about 45 minutes total including removing the bodywork to gain access to the cover. Putting it back on after having it rebuilt took about the same.

The 400 would take a little longer because the water pump bolts to the outside of the cover so you would have to remove that and the oil filter first.
 

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I guess it depends on what you call difficult. I though it was pretty simple. Remove the magneto cover. Unplug the wire to the stator and unbolt the CKP sensor. Pull the stator off the end of the crankshaft. Took me about 45 minutes total including removing the bodywork to gain access to the cover. Putting it back on after having it rebuilt took about the same.

The 400 would take a little longer because the water pump bolts to the outside of the cover so you would have to remove that and the oil filter first.
LOL! I didn't mention that this happened in 2011, when all this was new to me. Since then, I bought tools and a service manual and learned how to do the work myself. It's been a learning experience, to be sure. LeDude's tutorials are awesome, and the advice from knowledgeable posters such as yourself, salute, have been most helpful. I was afraid of it back then.

That said, replacing both the stator and the regulator requires removing petty much all of the tupperware on the left side just to gain access. That's tedious, to sy the least, and can be difficult the first time through it. It isn't something you want to pay someone to do.

Regards
Scott Fraser
 

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While we are at it, has anyone verified that the actual stator core - never mind the plugs - is compatible with older Suzuki's, as one UK supplier suggests?
 

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Erick if you are talking about stators from the 400 made before 2003 I have no idea since we don't have those bikes over here. Maybe some of the other members from your side of the Atlantic will know the answer.
 

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If you are talking about the 650 the part number for the stator is the same for all models from 2003 to 2012, 32101-10G00. I did a cross reference on the number and it is only listed as valid for the 650 and no other Suzuki bikes. Of course that might be because the wiring harness is included with the stator and the crankshaft position sensor is part of that harness.
 

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Rectifiers are really not "all that" bike specific. You want to find one that matches your stators charging amp rating. The wiring for rectifiers is usually a 5 wire bundle. There are 3 yellow wires from the stator. As long as these three wires are connected to the rectifier yellow (in no specific order) it will be correct. There is also a positive connection and a negative from the rectifier that needs to go to the battery. Almost any rectifier will work as long as you know the rating and buy accordingly. Don't score a killer deal on a Chinese Product because you will probably be back looking again.

There was a recall on the rectifiers from (hope this is correct) the 2007 Burgman 400. There are a lot of the newer models on ebay for sale for short money. I bought two because the rectifier was not on the salvage scooter I bought. Both are alive and doing well. I actually removed a rectifier from a older (antique) GL1000 Goldwing. I installed different terminal ends on it and ran the scooter around the block for a week or two until the OEM units arrived. It kept the battery charged and didn't bleed it down when I shut it off. A bad stator is usually the "kiss of death" for your charging system. It usually mandates replacing not only the stator but the rectifier as well.

The stator, naturally needs to be an OEM/rebuilt original that fits inside the scooter engine. Depending on your skill level you will find it a challenge (or not) to change out..... however regardless of your skill level it remains a pain in the A**.

Hope this helps
 

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