Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I installed a Speedhealer on my 2013 Burgman today. I had anticipated that it would be a long drawn out process with lots of body work that needed to be removed in order to get to the speed sensor connector. Luckily this was not the case. The only thing I needed to remove was the fuse block under the seat. The connector is located just behind the metal tab on the frame that the fuse block snaps onto. I routed the cable to the area underneath the seat where the tool kit is mounted. A quick program of the Speedhealer using a 10% correction and now my speedometer is spot on.

The first picture shows the fuse block attached to the frame. In the center of the fuse block at the top you can see the plastic tang that locks the fuse block to the frame. Push the tang toward the fuse block and it will lift out and can then be moved to the side out of the way until everything is connected.

Picture two shows the metal plate welded to the frame that the fuse block mounts to. The speed sensor connector is located, at least on my bike, just behind this metal plate. I pulled it out from behind the plate so I would have easy access to the connector and be able to separate it.

Picture three shows the connector separated and the Speedhealer connectors attached to the bikes connector.

Picture four shows where I decided to mount the unit. It's out of the way, out of the rain and it's easy to access if I want to change the settings.

There is another cable that comes with the Speedhealer which has a small button on one end. This cable is to access the top recorded speed feature. You push the button on the cable and the speedometer on the bike points to the top speed the bike has gone. A cool feature if you're riding a Suzuki Hayabusa and want to impress you buds. But I didn't hook up the cable because I'm really not interested in knowing what my top speed was.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Have you noticed any changes in the CVT behavior?
Well yes I have.

Today was the first day that I rode the Burgman to work with the Speedohealer installed and doing different speeds. While the speedometer is spot on the SECVT shifts a bit different when coming to a stop. Very jerky is the best way that I can describe it. It is also a bit jerky when I'm accelerating from an almost stop, say 15 mph.

Also, the ECO light that normally comes on while at cruise speed on the 2013-14 models has a much smaller range on the throttle. Normally if say I'm cruising along at 55 mph the ECO light comes, I have to turn the throttle a bit/ accelerate to make the light got out. Now with the Speedohealer installed if the light even comes on and I barely twist the throttle the ECO light will quickly go out.

I've done a bit of research and found the cure which is to run a jumper wire and cut the bikes wire harness, something I'm not willing to do on a new bike. I don't mind paying money for something that works as intended and that's plug and play, but when I need to make my own connections into the bikes harness that is another story. So I contacted the US distributor, Blue Monkey Motorsports and they are more than happy to accept the return with their 30 day for any reason return policy. The Speedohealer is a nice product and according to the distributor it is only a very small percentage of 650 Burgmans that are effected with the odd transmission behavior. I'll be sending it back tomorrow and live with the 10% optimistic speedometer.

I'd be interested to know if any other 2013-14 B650 owner have installed one of these and their bike acted just as it did before the install.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,973 Posts
I've done a bit of research and found the cure which is to run a jumper wire and cut the bikes wire harness, something I'm not willing to do on a new bike. I don't mind paying money for something that works as intended and that's plug and play, but when I need to make my own connections into the bikes harness that is another story.

The Speedohealer is a nice product and according to the distributor it is only a very small percentage of 650 Burgmans that are effected with the odd transmission behavior. I'll be sending it back tomorrow and live with the 10% optimistic speedometer.

I'd be interested to know if any other 2013-14 B650 owner have installed one of these and their bike acted just as it did before the install.
This I simply what you have to do to make it work without affecting the shifting. ErikDK used two to change the speedo and shifting as desired.

What they told you isn't truthful. If you change the speed signal by connecting it in between the sensor and bike harness you are going to affect everything that reads that signal. Since the 650 CVT is electronically controlled it uses that signal to control shifting so it will affect all 650's whether or not the owner notices.

Reducing the speed signal would cause the CVT to keep the RPM's higher a bit like a earlier 650 or your bike being in Power mode hence it coming out of Eco easily.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
I just put my SpeedHealer on my 400 today also.
Wow, what a simple process to do. And programming it, couldn't be easier.
If you don't know where to put it on a K7/K8 here is how.
Step 1, open trunk,
Step 2, remove engine cover.
Step 3, connector is about a hands width away from the strut that holds the seat up towards the back, laterally from the frame. Unplug and plug in the harness.
Step 4, plug in Speed healer.
Step 5, mount the healer. (I drilled a 1/2 hole and then fed the harness into the trunk. Next, using the sticky tape included, stuck it to the front edge of the inside of the trunk)
Step 6, program it.
Programing took about a minute, probably less.
If you like engineering things, to me this SpeedHealer is beautiful. It's simple, very effective, very durable, and very easy to use.
My K7-400 was measured on the highway with gps going 70 and the "meter" showed 77. That is a full 9.1% off. Just program 9.1 into the healer and viola, the speedometer reads exactly what the gps shows. It is not at all cheep, but it fixes what I can only consider an extremely lazy design from the factory. I can understand at most 3% off, but 9%!?! Sheesh.
It's not a safety feature to have the speedo read faster than what you are actually going. It's just dumb. It's there simply to provide me with my indicated speed and nothing else. I don't want it trying to trick me into going slower by indicating I am going faster. I don't want it to do anything other than what it is designed for.
So in actuality, my 38500 mile scooter, really has 35000 miles on it. The 50 mpg you think you are getting really are only getting 45!
Now at 40mph my rpms are 4000, at 50mph 4800~4900. I do have Dr Pulley Sliders installed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,936 Posts
It is really quite simple to draw a single wire from the speed sensor, before the healer, to the CVT-controller part of the ECU.

If you don't want to cut wires in the scooter's harness, you will need to take out the corresponding terminal from the connector and put in a new one connected to the new "uncorrected speed" cable.

Not having the tools and the know-how, I chose to cut the pink wire an inch from the connector and solder the cable to the connector end and isolate the harness end.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Speedohealer NOT worth it!

azccj,
I too had the same issue as you on my 2005 AN650. I bought it, tried it and then sold the Speedohealer, as I did not like like want is did to the RPMs of my 650. Not worth it, and I will deal with the 10% error. I did this many years ago, and when I posted here about my problem, no one believed me. You can probably find my old post here on the forum.:(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
The Speedohealer is now removed, boxed up and ready to be returned. Went for a ride today without it installed and the bike shifts normally and the ECO light comes on just like it originally did. I wonder if with a Speedohealer installed if it effects the way the ABS works?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,973 Posts
azccj,
I too had the same issue as you on my 2005 AN650. I bought it, tried it and then sold the Speedohealer, as I did not like like want is did to the RPMs of my 650. Not worth it, and I will deal with the 10% error.
I'm not sure most realize that there are two errors, one with the speedometer, and one with the odometer. What makes even less sense is there is a difference between them.:confused: The speedometer generally reads 10-12% high and the odometer reads about 2% high so making the speedometer read correctly makes the odometer read say 8% low.

I wonder if with a Speedohealer installed if it effects the way the ABS works?
Not likely since the ABS system used two independent wheel speed sensors one at each wheel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Thanks for the photos

Thanks, this was a big help. I thought I was going to have to take the bike apart... I will be attempting to install my speedohealer on my B#3, 2014 B650 soon :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
742 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
I bought a 2008 Exec last fall -- Sept. 2016 -- and put a SpeedoHealer in it then, using the reach-in-the-side method (after taking out a screw or pop-rivit or two).

(BTW, I set it such that the speedometer display was lowered by 9.2%. This is the exact same figure I used on my 2007 Exec -- bought new -- in Sept. 2007. I arrived at -9.2% by using a GPS back in 2007 and a GPS/speed phone app in 2016. I rode that 2007 Exec for almost five more years, and didn't notice any problems.)

Where was I ... Oh, yeah, last fall, on the new-to-me 2008 Exec. I got in about 1,500 miles of riding on that bike, and didn't notice any problems. I hardly ever use Power mode, BTW; maybe just before starting a pass on a two-lane road, and during a track day, but that's pretty much it.

In any case, with the 2008 in the garage for the winter, I had most of the tupperware off the bike for assorted projects. I did the bypass, i.e., running a wire up front from the SH, cutting that wire at the ECM, and connecting the bypass wire. I did this mostly for the heck of it, couldn't hurt, and so forth, even though I had never done this bypass on my 2007. I'm not sure I even knew of it back then.

With the snows just about done here, I went for my first ride of the season yesterday, about 150 miles of backroad fun. I didn't notice any problem. Again, I used the Power mode once or twice for passing moves. About a third of that ride was on the Taconic Parkway in NY State; that's a scenic and very hilly road, so the RPMs are all over the place. Put another way, it's a terrible road for trying to figure out what effect the bypass had on the RPMs.

This has been my experience with two Execs, both with the SH installed: one long-termer (the 2007) without the bypass, and one new-ish to me (the 2008) with the bypass wired. No noticeable problems, to me, either way.

From my readings here, it looks like Suzuki lowered the RPMs across the board on the 650s in the last few years, to save gas (which I think is a terrible idea -- possibly introducing driveability issues on a bike that already had good mileage). It looks as if messing with these newer bikes is a more critical issue, but I've only read about this, i.e., no personal experience.

So, in case my experience is relevant to this discussion, that's my report.

BTW, I don't have the thread link handy, but "Thank you!" to whoever posted all that detailed information about which ECM wire to cut, for my 2008 work over the winter.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,347 Posts
my speedos only have 3 or 4 holes in em, don't need healing yet.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
Im having the same issue as everyone else. Has anybody actually cut the wire at the ECM like SH requested to see if it works?
Yes.

As I mentioned earlier, I installed a SpeedoHealer (which the original owner of the 2008 Exec had sitting around for maybe eight years, but had never installed) this past fall. And rode the scoot for c. 1,500 miles.

Then, this winter, I ran the bypass wire from the SH up front, snipped the original stock wire to the ECM, and connected my added wire (and left the original "input" wire to the ECM unused). This was as described by @ron2215 in several very helpful posts in this thread from 2011: http://burgmanusa.com/forums/32-how/46703-speedo-healer-installation.html

Earlier this week, amidst the melting snow, I took my first ride of the season, i.e., the first ride after changing the input to the ECM, for about 150 miles.

Now, defining "works" is a little difficult, in terms of what RPM the bike uses. That's because the CVT keeps the RPMs moving all over the place, unless you're on exactly level ground, with a throttle lock or very steady wrist, no changes in wind, and so forth. So noting whether the new RPMs are lower, higher, or the same is a problem. I took some notes last year, anticipating this situation, but Monday's ride was generally too hilly and too spirited for meaningful comparisons.

But, for now, here's another definition of "works": I got a speedometer readout, and the RPMs changed, as always, when giving the bike gas or not, when going up hills or not, when tooling along slowly in a town or not, etc. Put another way, my 2008 Exec had no running issues, and seemed just to run fine, and seemed like it always had.

I did one minor confirmation test, for about 15 minutes: I verified the speedometer reading via a phone GPS app. When I had initially set the SH percentage last fall, I took some speed readings with the phone, trying to hold various speeds steady (at 60 mph and 70 mph). And then I set the SH accordingly, and did some monitoring the next ride after that, last fall. And the bike's readout was fine, agreed with the GPS.

This past Monday, I verified that the bike's readout still agreed with the GPS, after making that SH/ECM bypass mod. The speedometer still agreed with the GPS.

So, after doing the bypass surgery, I can state two things:

1) The speedometer was still corrected properly (as it was by the SH, but before the bypass).

2) The RPMs still changed according to the needs of the engine, it seemed to me. I didn't notice any sluggishness, any change at all.

So, I suspect -- because of those two things -- that the work I did in hooking up that bypass wire was successful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I can notice immediately on mine at low speeds when installed. The on, off throttle is very abrupt and the engine braking at lower speeds is extreme.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
I can notice immediately on mine at low speeds when installed. The on, off throttle is very abrupt and the engine braking at lower speeds is extreme.
Well, a few comments, for what they're worth:

1) Almost all fuel-injected bikes have an unappealing abruptness in on/off throttle use (as opposed to more-open changes in throttle position).

To ameliorate this, I installed G2 throttle sleeves on both my 2007 and 2008 Execs; see http://www.g2ergo.com/store/g2-street-tamer-throttle-tube/

These have ovoid take-up spools ("cams"), such that there is a more gentle -- non-linear -- movement of the throttle cable when going from an EFI off state to an on state. If this weren't a widespread problem, companies such as G2 would have a hard time existing.

I installed a G2 device on my 2007 back in 2009; see this sub-gallery I created back then: http://www.g2ergo.com/store/g2-street-tamer-throttle-tube/ . In fact, I was the alpha tester for G2's product on the Burgman.

On the 2008 I bought last fall, I installed a G2 cam/sleeve shortly after I got it.

Bottom line here: this abruptness would be less noticeable to me.

2) I see that you have a 2016 model (which fact you might want to include in your signature block, as that information is often relevant in questions and answers, and is easier than looking it up in someone's profile).

I was away from this forum and Burgers from 2012 until last year, but from what I've since read Suzuki screwed up the Big Burgers the last few years, by making them more fuel-efficient ... at the cost of engine smoothness. Higher revs generally mean smoother running, if using more gas, and it looks to me as if Suzuki needlessly messed up.

So perhaps my experience with a 2008 is not relevant.

3) On both the 2007 and 2008, I set the SH at -9.2%, after experimenting with actual speed (GPS) vs. speedometer readout. I'd be interested in what people are setting the SH on newer models.

Assuming the current settings are somewhere in that vicinity, it's hard for me to understand how a small change like that would have a major impact. Or even how one might notice it. Maybe I don't do enough riding in stop-and-go traffic.

When @ron2215 did that 2011 write-up ( http://burgmanusa.com/forums/32-how/46703-speedo-healer-installation.html ), he wrote this in one of the posts:

Example of before and after...

Without the fix, the engine ran at 4,000 RPM at 50 MPH.
With the fix, the engine now runs at 3,800 RPM at 50 MPH.

That's a pretty small change, in this case 5%. It must have taken a lot of steady-state riding to even come to that conclusion. As I mentioned, you need a calm wrist and level ground, and even such things as tire pressure (and hence rolling resistance) will affect that. I did the bypass, just on general principles -- couldn't hurt -- and because I learned of it after re-joining the community here. But I didn't have a problem -- in the sense of being bothered, or that I noticed -- beforehand, and didn't notice any difference in a day's riding since. Maybe once I get to doing some superslab trips this year, I can dig out my RPM notes from last fall.

4) I seldom use Power mode. You folks? If so, that may be relevant to this discussion.

And, maybe those newer 650s are just too different from the older models for me to have any meaningful comments.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
742 Posts
I think the older model pre body/dash change has ECU for Engine & ECU for CVT where the later has one handing both jobs so that bypass probably won't work. :-(

Greg
.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,936 Posts
I am very pleased with my dual Speedo Healer set-up on my 2007

One heals the speedo, the other, in the bypass line, is set to positive correction, and keeps the revs under light load down.

If you don't notice any difference in revs before and after speedo correction, then it's because you didn't ride any flat and straight roads at constant speed.

Cruising at 3500 rpm at 55 MPH on the cruise control feels good.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top